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The code works but looks messy so this might be a code review question where I didn't study enough of pythons conventions to know how to structure and organize the beginning of my file more pythonic. I basically just pasted in imports so they could be duplicates, not needed anymore or wrongly ordered. Can you advice anything how to structure my imports or can I leave code like this to focus on my own functions?

File 1:

from __future__ import with_statement
import logging
import os
from google.appengine.api.users import is_current_user_admin, UserNotFoundError
import time
import cgi
import geo.geotypes
import main
import captcha
from google.appengine import api
from google.appengine.runtime import DeadlineExceededError
from google.appengine.ext.webapp.util import run_wsgi_app
from google.appengine.ext.blobstore import BlobInfo
from google.appengine.ext.db import djangoforms
from django import forms
from django.core.exceptions import ValidationError
from django.utils import translation
from datetime import datetime, timedelta
os.environ['DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE'] = 'conf.settings'
from django.conf import settings
from django.template import RequestContext
from util import I18NHandler
import util
from google.appengine.api import urlfetch, taskqueue
from django.template.defaultfilters import register
from django.utils import simplejson as json
from functools import wraps
from google.appengine.api import urlfetch, taskqueue, users, images
from google.appengine.ext import db, webapp, search, blobstore
from google.appengine.ext.webapp import util, template
from google.appengine.runtime import DeadlineExceededError
from random import randrange
import Cookie
import base64
import cgi
import conf
import datetime
import hashlib
import hmac
import logging
import time
import traceback
import urllib
import twitter_oauth_handler
from twitter_oauth_handler import OAuthClient
from geo.geomodel import GeoModel
from django.utils.translation import gettext_lazy as _
webapp.template.register_template_library('common.templatefilters')

File 2 (there's are several instructions here I don't understand):

from __future__ import with_statement
                # -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import facebookconf
import os, wsgiref.handlers
os.environ[u'DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE'] = u'conf'
import util
import time
import logging
import urllib
import wsgiref.handlers
import appengine_admin
import cgi
import captcha
import re
import hashlib
import string
import hmac
import twitter_oauth_handler
from twitter_oauth_handler import OAuthClient
os.environ['DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE'] = 'conf.settings'
from geo.geomodel import GeoModel
from google.appengine.dist import use_library
from google.appengine.ext import blobstore, webapp, db, search
# template import must be run before other Django modules imports
from google.appengine.ext.webapp import blobstore_handlers, util, template
from google.appengine.ext.blobstore import BlobInfo
from google.appengine.ext.webapp.util import run_wsgi_app
from google.appengine.api import files, images, mail, memcache, users
from django.conf import settings
# Force Django reload
settings._target = None
from util import I18NHandler, FacebookBaseHandler
from google.appengine.ext.db import djangoforms
from django.utils import translation
from django.utils import simplejson as json
from django.contrib.formtools.preview import FormPreview
from random import choice
from urllib import quote
from google.appengine.api.users import is_current_user_admin, UserNotFoundError
from google.appengine.api import urlfetch
import random
import datetime
from datetime import timedelta
from django.utils.translation import gettext_lazy as _
from django.template import defaultfilters

How do I know when an import is no longer used since the function was moved or removed? Why can't I specify the same import for multiple files at one place and I must spec the same import in both files? I can imagine moveing handling imports to a separate file i.e. imports.yaml to specify imports for all python files in that directory or likewise.

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2  
How can one use so many imports in a single file?!? –  delnan Sep 10 '11 at 20:01
2  
How do I know when an import is no longer used since the function was moved or removed? use pylint (pypi.python.org/pypi/pylint/0.24.0) –  mouad Sep 10 '11 at 20:17
1  
To follow up on what delnan said. If most of these imports are actually used within the file, then it's a sign that your code could use some significant restructuring. It will be very difficult to maintain any code that is actually using all of those imports. –  Alec Munro Sep 10 '11 at 20:20
    
I could lint the code whic is about 2300 lines with 2000 lines in one file and 300 lines in one file where much is web request handlers. And these imports are already the "restructured" version. –  Niklas in Stockholm Sep 10 '11 at 20:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Once you've used pylint to identify duplicate and unused imports, and organized them according to PEP8 as the other answers suggest, you can further clean it up by changing the way you import packages.

Instead of

from google.appengine.api import urlfetch, taskqueue, users, images

you could just do

from google.appengine import api

then you would need to put "api.urlfetch", "api.taskqueue", etc. wherever you use those.

This isn't the "right" way to do it, it's just another way. You'll have to choose which one you prefer.

Also note that you can use aliases:

from google.appengine import api as gaeapi

now you would put "gaeapi.urlfetch". This is useful if you need to import modules called "api" from multiple packages.

Also, to answer your question "Why can't I specify the same import for multiple files at one place and I must spec the same import in both files?", if you're importing the same packages in multiple files, that could indicate those files are closely related, and should be merged into a single file. Unlike C++ or Java, where every class is its own file, the pythonic way is to make each module (file) as self-contained as possible, which usually means they contain multiple classes and functions.

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This is 3 answers in one so I learnt a lot. I started with one file main.py and now I have 'main.py' with models, `i18n.py' with request handlers and 'util.py' with base classes and common functions. The actual code I'll restructure you may find from this link pastebin.com/EPRfCTpS –  Niklas in Stockholm Sep 10 '11 at 23:47

I wouldn’t worry about it. Thnk of the imports as being there not to be read as such, but to provide a cross-reference: when someone comes across an unqualified identifier further down, and wonders where it came from, they can just search backwards for the first occurrence, and if it’s not defined locally in the file, they should hit a mention in an import statement which will tell them where it came from.

Conversely, you can check which imports are unused by searching forwards from the import to see if there are any mentions of the imported identifier; if not, then it should be safe to remove it.

Note this doesn’t work with wildcard imports. Don’t use wildcard imports.

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Good. I could also use a design pattern to organize which file does what and then it will become more clear and less duplicates. –  Niklas in Stockholm Sep 11 '11 at 20:04

Why can't I specify the same import for multiple files at one place and I must spec the same import in both files?

To answer only this question: you can.

all_imports.py
--------------
import google.appengine as gae
import geo
import catptcha

other.py
--------
from all_imports import *

Using `from ... import *' is bad practice when handled poorly (for example, importing five modules this way) as you end up with lots of names in your module namespace and it becomes difficult to track down where a variable/function/class came from.

When handled properly (such as in this example ;) it can be a great tool (where did gae come from? Oh, it must be in all_imports... I'll check there...).

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Cool! Now I have many options how to improve. Thanks –  Niklas in Stockholm Sep 11 '11 at 20:02

PEP 8 - Style Guide for Python code recomends to order your imports in fallowing order:

1. Standart library imports
2. - blank line -
3. google sdk imports
4. - blank line -
5. django imports
6. - blank line -
7. your own code imports

Import only things you use in code. Remove unused imports. You can use one of these tools to detect unused imports: Pydev on Eclipse / pyflakes / pylint

You have quite a lot imports. How big is your actual code? It might be a good idea to split it into few modules.

Why can't you import single time in single file? Well you actually could do it like this:

WARNING: THIS EXAMPLE ILLUSTRATES BAD CODING PRACTICES

import_all.py:

    import a
    import b
    import c

other.py:

     from import_all import *

But please don't do that. It is against all good practices of python development and against The Zen of Python:

Explicit is better than implicit.

...

Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!

I also recommend you to read the python documentation on modules and something about python namespaces.

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3  
I read PEP8 as suggesting Google SDK and Django imports belonging together, in the "related third party" section. Not to say it wouldn't be cleaner this way. :) –  Alec Munro Sep 10 '11 at 20:22
    
I'm actually refactoring to use 3 files: main.py i18n.py and util.py moving code that both main.py and i18n.py needs to util.py. The files main.py and i18n.py are about 2300 lines together. I'm glad it works but it sure looks unstructured and I don't even understand all my imports. –  Niklas in Stockholm Sep 10 '11 at 20:32

PEP8 has a section on Imports (that I can't link directly).

Basically, for organizing, here's what you want to do:

Imports should be grouped in the following order:

1. standard library imports
2. related third party imports
3. local application/library specific imports

You should put a blank line between each group of imports.

Oh, I believe PyDev for Eclipse has an "organize imports" command.

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Thank you. I'm still learning python coming from a Java background. –  Niklas in Stockholm Sep 10 '11 at 20:30

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