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I want a function that returns the content of a given directory. For this, I am using scandir from dirent.h. The code below compiles successfully (gcc -Wall test.c), but the last printf leads to a segmentation fault. It means that the "eps" structure (a pointer to an array of pointers to dirent structures) is still empty after the function: how can I fix this?

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <dirent.h>
#include <string.h>

static int myselector(const struct dirent * dir_entry)
{
  char * pch = strstr(dir_entry->d_name, ".");
  return pch == NULL ? 1 : 0;
}

int list_dir(char * dirname, struct dirent ** eps)
{
  int nbfiles = scandir(dirname, &eps, myselector, alphasort);
  if(nbfiles > 0)
  {
    printf("inside function: %s\n", eps[0]->d_name);
    return 1;
  }
  else
    return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  int status = 0;
  struct dirent ** eps = NULL;
  status = list_dir("/home", eps);
  if (status)
  {
    puts("ok");
    printf("outside function: %s\n", eps[0]->d_name);
  }
  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because your pointer has changed, and you're looking at the wrong thing in main() :)

You're passing a pointer to a pointer to a pointer to scandir(). it's changing what the pointer to a pointer is pointing at (I know, that hurts to read ... ).

Because you're calling scandir() with &eps in your function, you lose that change outside of the function. The value of eps has changed inside your function.

To better understand this, in your current function wrap the scandir() call with printf() statements showing you what the value contained in eps is:

...
printf("%p\n", eps);
int nbfiles = scandir(dirname, &eps, myselector, alphasort);
printf("%p\n", eps);
...

To fix this change your function to:

int list_dir(char * dirname, struct dirent *** eps)
{
  int nbfiles = scandir(dirname, eps, myselector, alphasort);
  if(nbfiles != -1)
  {
    printf("inside function: %s\n", (*eps)[0]->d_name);
    return 1;
  }
  else
    return 0;
}

And call it as ...

status = list_dir("/home", &eps);

in main(). It will then work perfectly:

broach@roach-VirtualBox:~$ ./test
inside function: broach
ok
outside function: broach

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, clear answer on a typical "pointer-to-pointer-to..." example... I need to engrave it in my head! – tflutre Sep 10 '11 at 20:49
    
Glad I could help :) – Brian Roach Sep 10 '11 at 21:07

You don't seem to be covering the case where scandir returns 0, i.e., empty directory. Return value of -1 is only for errors.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I was a bit quick for this short example, it's fixed now. – tflutre Sep 10 '11 at 20:34
    
Did that fix the segfault? – Tom Zych Sep 10 '11 at 20:35
    
No. The segfault is not due to the fact that the input directory can be empty, but rather to the fact that the "eps" structure is filled inside my "listd_dir" function, and then emptied once the function is finished. And I don't know how to prevent this. – tflutre Sep 10 '11 at 20:38
    
See my answer - the problem is that the pointer to the dirent stricture gets reassigned. – Brian Roach Sep 10 '11 at 20:39

Make list_dir take struct dirent *** instead of struct dirent **, get rid of the & operator in the scandir() call, and add it to the list_dir() call from main. The first lines of list_dir() become:

int list_dir(char * dirname, struct dirent *** eps)
{
  int nbfiles = scandir(dirname, eps, myselector, alphasort);

and the list_dir() call in main becomes:

status = list_dir("/home", &eps);

That way list_dir() can let scandir() modify eps from main() via its address, instead of modifying the argument, on the stack, passed to list_dir().

share|improve this answer
    
perfect, thanks! (and sorry not to choose your answer, Brian Roach was quicker from a few minutes ;) – tflutre Sep 10 '11 at 20:45

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