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In .NET (C#) I follow some custom conventions and patterns that require Constructors, Initialization functions and IDisposable implementations. A typical class is illustrated below. No initialization is done directly in the constructor but rather through a dedicated function that is supposed to make the object reusable. However, I am not sure what happens when Dispose gets called. If the GC calls it, the reference to the object is lost anyways so no worries there. If it is explicitly called, are there any drawbacks simply calling Initialize and treating the class as a fresh object since GC.SupressFinalize has been called? Lol, I'm sure I could have asked this in an easier way.

public abstract class Thread: System.IDisposable
{

    protected bool Disposed { get; set; }
    protected bool Terminate { get; private set; }
    public bool IsRunning { get; private set; }
    private System.Threading.Thread ThreadObject { get; set; }

    public Thread ()
    {
        this.Initialize();
    }

    ~Thread ()
    {
        this.Dispose(false);
    }

    public virtual void Initialize ()
    {
        this.Stop();

        this.Disposed = false;
        this.Terminate = true;
        this.IsRunning = false;
        this.ThreadObject = null;
    }

    //====================================================================================================
    // Functions: Thread
    //====================================================================================================

    public void Start ()
    {
        if (!this.IsRunning)
        {
            this.IsRunning = true;
            this.Terminate = false;

            this.ThreadObject = new System.Threading.Thread(new System.Threading.ThreadStart(this.Process));
            this.ThreadObject.Start();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Override this method to do thread processing.
    /// [this.Terminate] will be set to indicate that Stop has been called.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="template"></param>
    protected abstract void Process ();

    public void Stop (System.TimeSpan timeout)
    {
        if (this.IsRunning)
        {
            this.Terminate = true;

            try
            {
                if (timeout.TotalMilliseconds > 1D)
                {
                    this.ThreadObject.Join(timeout);
                }
                else
                {
                    this.ThreadObject.Join();
                }
            }
            catch
            {
                try
                {
                    this.ThreadObject.Abort();
                }
                catch
                {
                }
            }

            this.ThreadObject = null;
            this.IsRunning = false;
        }
    }

    //====================================================================================================
    // Interface Implementation: System.IDisposable
    //====================================================================================================

    public void Dispose ()
    {
        this.Dispose(true);

        System.GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose (bool disposing)
    {
        if (!this.Disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                // Dispose managed resources.
                this.Stop(System.TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
            }

            // Dispose unmanaged resources here.

            // Note disposing has been done.
            this.Disposed = true;
        }
    }

}
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4  
It is not a typical class that requires IDiposable. Take a major hint from not being able to come up with anything useful to do in the Dispose() methods. –  Hans Passant Sep 10 '11 at 23:57
    
To put it in a simpler way which I should have, the object is a self-contained custom class and I want to be able to reuse objects by calling Initialize() even if Dispose() has been explicitly called. Of course the Initialize function sets the Disposed flag back to false but will this cause any issues with the CG since SuppressFinalize would also definitely have been called? –  Raheel Khan Sep 11 '11 at 0:03
    
@user: Yes that is an issue, but you can simply call GC.ReRegisterForFinalize() on the object and that is resolved. I second Hans comment though - for most classes it is not appropriate to implement IDisposable –  BrokenGlass Sep 11 '11 at 0:08
    
Calling a virtual method Initialize btw from a constructor is bad practice. Object initializers go outwards-in, and constructors in-out. Hence an overridden virtual method could be called before it's constructor and blow up. –  TheCodeKing Sep 11 '11 at 0:49
    
+1 for the interesting question –  Artur Mustafin Sep 11 '11 at 15:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The GC never calls Dispose, it's up to the consuming code. The GC does however call the finalizer. This is used in the best practice IDisposable implementation to clean up unmanaged code only.

Where Dispose is used outside of the context of a finalizer, then there is no need for the GC to call the finalizer, and therefore SuppressFinalize is used as an optimisation to prevent it happening twice.

If the object is reused this causes an issue. Technically you can re-register the finalizer on initialization, but this would need to be made thread safe. Common practice is that an object is not reused after it has been Disposed, and typically the Dispose method should only execute exactly once. IMO the initializer method and object reuse introduces complexities to the pattern that move it away from it's intended purpose.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm aware of that. My question is whether there is a drawback to reusing a custom object as shown above. Since the class is self-contained, am I breaking any rules here? –  Raheel Khan Sep 10 '11 at 23:59
    
"This is used in the best practice IDisposable implementation " - I'd say that it's better to avoid the need for a finalizer in most IDisposable implementations by using a wrapper class (e.g. SafeHandle) to wrap unmanaged resources. Only the wrapper class needs a finalizer. –  Joe Sep 11 '11 at 12:35
1  
The best practice IDisposable implementation I refer to is here. It also recommends a the SafeHandle approach instead of IDisposable. However using Dispose really needs the finalizer. –  TheCodeKing Sep 11 '11 at 12:47
    
@CodeKing, that article's not very clear - you still need to dispose a SafeHandle, so a class that owns one will still need to implement IDisposable. But an implementation that only disposes managed resources doesn't need a finalizer. –  Joe Sep 11 '11 at 14:45
1  
@TheCodeKing: Event subscriptions and thread-static fields are prime examples of unmanaged resources within the managed-code universe. If a class instance sets a thread-static field to point to some object, for example, it should be wrapped in a "using" block to ensure that instance has a chance to un-set that field before leaving scope. Otherwise, if that class instance was created in a thread-pool thread, that thread-static field and the object referred to thereby might be kept alive indefinitely even if the thread gets recycled for some purpose that neither knows nor cares about it. –  supercat Oct 4 '11 at 23:40

There's no technical reason why you can't reactivate a disposed object in this way, though I woudln't do it as it's against the principle of least surprise (most disposable objects are used once).

If you really do want to go this way, I'd avoid having a finalizer, which means your IDisposable class must not directly own any unmanaged resources. You can do this by wrapping any unmanaged resources your class uses in a manged wrapper (e.g. look at the SafeHandle class for an example).

share|improve this answer
    
I have not looked at SafeHandle as yet but I understand what you're saying and yes, none of the classes implemented this way contain unmanaged resources. They do, however, contain large blobs of managed memory including images and statistical data.So the class above for example, is a base for documents that need to implement a threaded Process function. –  Raheel Khan Sep 12 '11 at 20:04
    
These objects are contained in a custom collection (List<Document>) that also implements IDisposable and uses TPL on 8 cores consuming about 16GB of memory. Furthermore, the individual documents also fire off events that are propagated to the GUI consumer via the collection. In short, I'm not sure how this can be achieved without a finalizer that forces the GC to free up needed memory in time. –  Raheel Khan Sep 12 '11 at 20:05
    
So far as I can tell from an initial glimpse at SafeHandle, it is an approach more appropriate for classes containing unmanaged resources. –  Raheel Khan Sep 12 '11 at 20:10

I don't like all the precise details of your thread handling, but if you are going to have a class where each instance owns a thread, you should provide a Dispose method which will ensure that the instance's thread dies off in an orderly fashion.

If you want to allow for the thread to get cleaned up even when an object is abandoned, you'll probably have to create a wrapper object to which the outside application holds a reference but your thread does not. The Finalize() method for that wrapper object should nudge the thread in such a way that it will die off. The thread could simply poll a flag every few seconds to see if it should exit, or there could be a more sophisticated termination strategy.

I'm confused, though, why Initialize calls Stop()? I would have expected it to call Start().

share|improve this answer
    
Calling Stop() from Initialize is just me being lazy. Calling Start() is not what is intended. The purpose of this class is to allow derived classes to implement a Process() function that is automatically threaded without worrying about thread implementation. So a consumer class would simply call Start() and not have to worry about calling Stop(). –  Raheel Khan Sep 12 '11 at 20:25

Wrong language pattern appication sample is used in the code. I clearly see C++ backgroung for the C# code author. Unfortunately C++ coding techniques in not applicable in C# language.

Better not to allow object to get into garbage collector (GC), simply referencing it somewhere else, as in the Singleton pattern, rather that trying to resurrect disposed object, or use Dispose pattern in a language not allowing full control for the garbage collector and memory management, as is to be true, for example, in C++.

Simply, you should not use C++ idioms in C#, but the tips and tricks are:

Interfaces instead of pure virtual functions in C++, Interface inheritancee instead of multiple class inheritance in C++, No memory management (use weak references) instead of full controlled object lifetime in C++

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. No choice of patterns in my case though. –  Raheel Khan Sep 12 '11 at 20:29

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