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This section of my script checks whether the distro is either Ubuntu or Arch. The problem is that I cannot figure out what to replace the OR with to make it work. I tried -o and other suggestions from various websites without succes.

if [ ! $(lsb_release -is) == "Ubuntu" OR "Arch" ]; then
 echo "Neither Ubuntu nor Arch!"
 read -p "Continue anyway(y/N)? "
 sleep 0
 [ "$REPLY" == "y" ] || exit
fi
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use something like:

rel="$(lsb_release -is)"
if [[ "${rel}" != "Ubuntu" && "${rel}" != "Arch" ]]; then
   # Neither Ubuntu nor Arch
fi
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Use a case/esac construct

case $(lsb_release -is) in
  Ubuntu|Arch ) echo "Ubuntu or Arch found";;
  * ) 
 echo "Neither Ubuntu nor Arch!"
 read -p "Continue anyway(y/N)? "
 sleep 0
 [ "$REPLY" == "y" ] || exit
 ;;
esac
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Closest to your original code would be:

if [[ ! $(lsb_release -is) =~ Ubuntu|Arch ]]; then 
    echo "Neither Ubuntu nor Arch!"
    read -p "Continue anyway(y/N)? "
    sleep 0
    [ "$REPLY" == "y" ] || exit; 
fi

This uses the match operator introduced in bash 3. Also note that the above is valid in bash 3.2, prior to that you need to use quotes for the pattern.

if you don't have bash 3 you can use grep

if ! lsb_release -is| egrep -q 'Ubuntu|Arch'; then 
    echo "Neither Ubuntu nor Arch!"
    read -p "Continue anyway(y/N)? "
    sleep 0
    [ "$REPLY" == "y" ] || exit; 
fi

Note that -q is a non-standard option of grep

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To answer my own question, here is a slightly longer but more flexible way of achieving the same result.

rel="$(lsb_release -is)"
if [[ "${rel}" = "Arch" ]]; then
    echo "It's Arch"
  elif [[ "${rel}" = "Ubuntu" ]]; then
    echo "It's Ubuntu"
  else
    echo "It's Neither"
    read -p "Continue anyway(y/N)? "
    sleep 0
    [ "$REPLY" == "y" ] || exit
fi
share|improve this answer
    
Here, too, you want to use case. –  tripleee Sep 11 '11 at 15:27

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