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Well I have a serious problem. I have a class that manages connections with NSOperationQueue and delegate methods for that class that are actually NSURLConnection delegate methods. Sometimes, I have to pop the viewController that has the answer of my delegate class but it gets trapped in the scope of the delegate function, populating a UITableView and the app crashes just there. I solved it using @synchronized on the viewController dealloc and on the NSURLConnection delegates, but I don't think is the cleanest way since UI freezes sometimes when I'm adding a lot of info to the tableView. So, is there a way to do this clean?

- (void)viewDidLoad:(BOOL)animated {
[myManager startRequest];
}

//myManager class callback
- (void)managerDelegate {
//Doing things and just poped the viewController while in the function scope
//Program crashes, most of logs are "UIViewController message sent to deallocated instance"
}

//viewController dealloc
- (void)dealloc
{
    @synchronized([Manager class])
    {
    alert.delegate = nil;
    searchResultsTableView.delegate = nil;
    searchResultsTableView.dataSource = nil;
    [searchResultsTableView release]; searchResultsTableView = nil;
    [serviceSearch release]; serviceSearch = nil;
    [searchResults release]; searchResults = nil;
    [XMLTag release]; XMLTag = nil;
    [XMLParserServicesKeys release]; XMLParserServicesKeys = nil;
    [XMLParserKeys release]; XMLParserKeys = nil;
    [searchString release]; searchString = nil;
    [__managedObjectContext release]; __managedObjectContext = nil;
    manager.delegate = nil; 
    [manager stopAllRequests];
    [manager release]; manager = nil;
    [super dealloc];
    }
}

Edit: some more code, now of myManager class

- (void) stopAllRequests
{
#ifdef _WSMANAGER_DEBUG_
    NSLog(@"stopAllRequests %d", [connectionsArray count]);
#endif
    [[UIApplication sharedApplication] setNetworkActivityIndicatorVisible:NO];

    for(NNSURLConnection* connection in connectionsArray)
    {
        [connection cancel];
        [connection release];
    }


    [connectionsArray removeAllObjects];    
    [queue cancelAllOperations];
}


- (BOOL)startRequest
{   
//Data initialization       
    NSInvocationOperation* operation = [[NSInvocationOperation alloc] initWithTarget:self selector:@selector(beginConnection:) object:[NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:request, kRequestKey, keyInfo, kUserInfoKey, nil]];
    [queue addOperation:operation];
    [operation release];
    return YES;
}

-(void) beginConnection:(id)object
{   
    NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

    NNSURLConnection* connection = [[NNSURLConnection alloc] initWithRequest:[object objectForKey:kRequestKey] delegate:self];

    if(connection)
    {
        NSMutableData *requestData = [[NSMutableData alloc] init];

        connection.url = [((NSURLRequest*)[object objectForKey:kRequestKey]) URL];

        connection.userInfo = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:[object objectForKey:kUserInfoKey], kUserInfoKey, requestData, kRequestDataKey, nil];
        [connectionsArray addObject:connection];

        [[UIApplication sharedApplication] setNetworkActivityIndicatorVisible:YES];
    }

    [[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] runUntilDate:[NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSinceNow:TIMEOUT]];

    if([connectionsArray indexOfObject:connection] != NSNotFound)
    {
        [connection cancel];

        if([delegate conformsToProtocol:@protocol(ManagerDelegate)] && [delegate respondsToSelector:@selector(managerFailed:withKey:errorCode:)]) {
            [delegate managerFailed:self withKey:[connection.userInfo objectForKey:kUserInfoKey] errorCode:ManagerErrorCodeTimeout];
            if([connectionsArray count] < 1)
                [[UIApplication sharedApplication] setNetworkActivityIndicatorVisible:NO];
        }

        [connectionsArray removeObject:connection];
    }
    [pool drain];
}

- (void)connectionDidFinishLoading:(NNSURLConnection *)connection {
    @synchronized([Manager class])
    {   
    NSMutableData *requestData = [connection.userInfo objectForKey:kRequestDataKey];
    NSString* responseString = [[NSString alloc] initWithData:requestData encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];       
    if([delegate conformsToProtocol:@protocol(PLMWSManagerDelegate)] && [delegate respondsToSelector:@selector(managerSuccess:responseString:withKey:)])
        [delegate managerSuccess:self responseString:responseString withKey:[connection.userInfo objectForKey:kUserInfoKey]];
    [responseString release];
    [requestData release];
    [connectionsArray removeObject:connection];
    [connection cancel];
    [connection release]; connection = nil;

    if([connectionsArray count] < 1)
        [[UIApplication sharedApplication] setNetworkActivityIndicatorVisible:NO];
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
This seems like a strange way around of doing things. Instead of creating and responding to connections on the main thread you seem to be running them synchronously (but not by their synchronous interface, instead by giving each a dedicated run loop) and via an operation queue so that they don't interrupt the main thread. Is there a reason you don't run them by their built-in asynchronous on the main run loop? –  Tommy Sep 11 '11 at 21:13
    
I think it is asynchronous since every call to startRequest creates its operation and it is ran by the current operation thread shown on the [NSRunLoop currentLoop] isn't it? Or how do you say it could be done on the main thread runLoop? –  Herz Rod Sep 11 '11 at 22:35
    
Sorry, my fault, I was being far too loose with the semantics. I considered your use to be synchronous because the thread that makes the request will block until the request is complete. Obviously it's asynchronous from the perspective of the main thread, since that posts the operation then goes about its business and waits to hear back. I'll edit my answer to add information about NSURLConnections on the main run loop. –  Tommy Sep 12 '11 at 0:56

3 Answers 3

When an application fetches data from INTERNET to populate GUI, keeping GUI and INTERNET thread totally separate will be help full. Following options did worked for me in same situation.

  1. Use – cancelAllOperations method of NSOperationQueue. this will cancel the quesue after operation that is running at present. If you do not cancel the operation then it will run on background.

  2. Keep a bridge data structure between table and INTERNET thread. Keep this in some other class then viewController so that it do not get released when you pop the viewcontroller.

  3. Populate table from that data structure and fill newly available data in that. Notify table using a NSNotification OR some other method when new data is available. So here in this case if you keep you operation queue running in background it will not go to update the tableView.

EDIT:

Moreover, As you are using NSURLconnection you can use - (void)cancel method to cancel the connection. Delegate will no longer get calls once you cancel the connection. It can be helpful in two ways.

  1. Cancel your last operation.

  2. Implement something like this in you class that calls child of custom delegate.

Hope above method is helpful.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, forgot to say that I set the manager delegate to nil, cancel all operations and set to nil the manager reference on the viewController's dealloc ... Using a NSNotification doesn't sound clean to me since I use my custom delegate methods to comunicate myManager class to the viewController, also I always have "new data" to populate tableView with; it's weird that cancelAllOperations does not cancel the current operation thread running, if it is supposed to do so –  Herz Rod Sep 11 '11 at 5:35
    
As you are using NAURLconnection you can use - (void)cancel method to cancel connection. Delegate will no longer get calls once you cancel the connection. It can be helpful in two ways. 1. Cancel your last operation. 2. Implement something like this in you class that calls child of custom delegate. –  Mohammad Sep 11 '11 at 5:50
    
It's weird because since the NSURLConnection delegate already answered and triggered myManager delegate method on the viewController, sometimes it is in the middle of the scope function and I pop the viewController and program crashes right there, no matter if I cancel the connection –  Herz Rod Sep 11 '11 at 5:54

Standard opening comment, given prominence with an eye to the future: Apple's contributions to the LLVM project suggest that iOS 5 will come with self-zeroing weak references. So objects can hold references to other objects without owning them, and when those objects are deallocated all the pointers to them are magically set to nil. We'll have to wait for the public release of the developer tools to find out whether iOS implements that functionality (it needs some runtime support for obvious reasons) and, if so, whether Apple are using it for delegates. However, that's likely to be quite soon and as a developer you should be able to get the NDA version of the tools that is currently available, so it may be worth considering that route to a solution depending on the other practicalities of your project.

More helpful for the here and now:

The delegate for NSURLConnections is immutable. Assuming the NSURLConnections are created by tasks on the NSOperationQueue that you mention, you may also be creating them on some runloop other than that attached to the main thread, bringing a whole sweep of thread safety issues into the mix.

I'd suggest that the smart thing to do is:

  1. ensure you're attaching all NSURLConnections to the main runloop. To do that you should create connections so that they don't start immediately, use scheduleInRunLoop:forMode: to nominate [NSRunLoop mainRunLoop] (and probably NSDefaultRunLoopMode), then start them.
  2. simultaneously, keep a list of all connections that you have started. You'll probably want to use an @synchronized block to add then to a suitable NSMutableArray
  3. when the object that is nominated to receive delegate methods is to be deallocated, perform waitUntilAllOperationsAreFinished on the operation queue and then send cancel to all ongoing connections (e.g. [self.arrayOfConnections makeObjectsPerformSelector:@selector(cancel)])

Connections are guaranteed not to communicate with their delegates after they have received the cancel message. You want to wait until all operations in the queue are finished to avoid a potential race condition whereby the view controller is deallocated having successfully killed all connections at some relevant time but a not-yet-completed operation then tries to add a new one.


Additional, based on our comment discussion on the question:

NSURLConnection has a built-in system to run asynchronously on a run loop. Run loops are Apple's version of an event loop, being in rough terms a list of messages to post. So they let you use a single thread to do lots of things but only if no single thing blocks the thread.

Apple actually recommend that the most efficient way (in terms of processing and battery life) to do an asynchronous URL access is by allowing NSURLConnection to run asynchronously on the main thread. You might adjust your current -(void) startConnection to:

- (BOOL)startRequest
{   
    // we're going to do all this right here on the main thread, so there's
    // no need to package 'request' and 'keyInfo' into a dictionary and create
    // an operation

    // create the connection
    NNSURLConnection* connection = [[NNSURLConnection alloc] initWithRequest:request delegate:self];

    if(connection)
    {
        NSMutableData *requestData = [[NSMutableData alloc] init];

        connection.url = [keyInfo URL];

        connection.userInfo = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:keyInfo, kUserInfoKey, requestData, kRequestDataKey, nil];
        [connectionsArray addObject:connection];

        [[UIApplication sharedApplication] setNetworkActivityIndicatorVisible:YES];
    }

    // We used initWithRequest:delegate: so the request has already started.
    // The connection will now run asynchronously and we can wait for
    // delegate messages, which will be delivered via the runloop on this thread
}

Then put the other things you were doing after the connection has ended into your connectionDidFinishLoading::

- (void)connectionDidFinishLoading:(NNSURLConnection *)connection {

    if([connectionsArray indexOfObject:connection] != NSNotFound)
    {
        [connection cancel];

        if([delegate conformsToProtocol:@protocol(ManagerDelegate)] && [delegate respondsToSelector:@selector(managerFailed:withKey:errorCode:)]) {
            [delegate managerFailed:self withKey:[connection.userInfo objectForKey:kUserInfoKey] errorCode:ManagerErrorCodeTimeout];
            if([connectionsArray count] < 1)
                [[UIApplication sharedApplication] setNetworkActivityIndicatorVisible:NO];
        }

        [connectionsArray removeObject:connection];
    }

    /* ...and all the other stuff here... */
}

I've assumed throughout that NNSURLConnection is a subclass of NSURLConnection that just adds a few extra properties, not otherwise affecting behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
Edited post and added some more code, hope you can check it and help if you want –  Herz Rod Sep 11 '11 at 5:55
    
So I don't to create a NSOperation and add it to the queue and run it on the current thread runLoop? If so, I didn't know NSURLConnections just run asynchronously ... Correct me please –  Herz Rod Sep 12 '11 at 2:05
    
Yep, just create the connection and let it run. It'll run asynchronously and report in the run loop on which it was created. Nothing will block and you'll get the delegate messages at opportune moments. –  Tommy Sep 12 '11 at 4:03
    
I'll try it and discuss with my partners and I'll let you know what happened, thanks in advice –  Herz Rod Sep 12 '11 at 13:40

There is perhaps a very good reason why you are doing things this way, but why are you not using the third party library ASIHttpConnection?

It manages URL connection details and even comes with a built in operation queue.

One other thing of note, as Tommy Obliquely notes ARC is upcoming (ARC has been publicly announced, therefore it's OK to mention it exists). Since ARC supports 4.0 devices, it would be a REALLY good idea to move to that if at all possible. You may run into some issues but it will probably cure more problems than it will cause.

share|improve this answer
    
My work partners doesn't seem to be cool using these kind of third party libraries; also, most of our apps need support for iOS 3.2 –  Herz Rod Sep 11 '11 at 5:40
1  
Just as a side note earlier versions of ASI would work fine on 3.2. As for not using third party libraries, you guys are REALLY hampering your iOS development with that philosophy and should really think hard about if that makes sense. But I appreciate the position you are in, I just had to suggest it in case you did not know as it could save a lot of trouble... –  Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Sep 11 '11 at 6:04

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