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Is there a reason why DISK_DETECTION_INFO is defined as

typedef struct _DISK_DETECTION_INFO {
  DWORD          SizeOfDetectInfo;
  DETECTION_TYPE DetectionType;
  union {
    struct {
      DISK_INT13_INFO    Int13;
      DISK_EX_INT13_INFO ExInt13;
    };
  };
} DISK_DETECTION_INFO, *PDISK_DETECTION_INFO;

instead of

typedef struct _DISK_DETECTION_INFO {
  DWORD          SizeOfDetectInfo;
  DETECTION_TYPE DetectionType;
  DISK_INT13_INFO    Int13;
  DISK_EX_INT13_INFO ExInt13;
} DISK_DETECTION_INFO, *PDISK_DETECTION_INFO;

or am I just overanalyzing this piece of code?

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The union only contains one member, so I think there is no difference. –  user623879 Sep 11 '11 at 5:56
    
are there any implications on alignment? –  David Heffernan Sep 11 '11 at 6:23
    
I suspect it was a simple mistake by whoever coded up the DISK_DETECTION_INFO structure. I'd guess that the DISK_INT13_INFO and DISK_EX_INT13_INFO structures were meant to be the members of the union, since only one or the other is used. The only harm caused by the mistake is that it wastes a bit of space. –  Michael Burr Sep 11 '11 at 6:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Arguably, it's a mistake. However, it's possible that we're only given the public definition of the structure. Internally (when used by the Windows kernel), it might be defined as:

typedef struct _DISK_DETECTION_INFO {
  DWORD          SizeOfDetectInfo;
  DETECTION_TYPE DetectionType;
  union {
    struct {
      DISK_INT13_INFO    Int13;
      DISK_EX_INT13_INFO ExInt13;
    };
    DISK_INTERNAL_INFO   Private; // Used internally, when DetectionType = -1
  };
} DISK_DETECTION_INFO, *PDISK_DETECTION_INFO;

I wouldn't volunteer this as maintainable, safe, or portable, but it's possible.

DISK_INTERNAL_INFO could even exceed the size of the anonymous struct - provided that a user is never instantiating the object themselves the technique might even be considered useful for hiding extra data away from the user but keeping it with the structure. They'd never "see" past the anonymous struct.

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I think there's reasonable evidence that someone made a simple mistake when they wrote the original DISK_DETECTION_INFO struct definition. This mistake escaped into the wild and so it was too late to fix it.

The definition in the header file is:

typedef struct _DISK_DETECTION_INFO {
        DWORD SizeOfDetectInfo;
        DETECTION_TYPE DetectionType;
        union {
                struct {

                        //
                        // If DetectionType == DETECTION_INT13 then we have just the Int13
                        // information.
                        //

                        DISK_INT13_INFO Int13;

                        //
                        // If DetectionType == DETECTION_EX_INT13, then we have the
                        // extended int 13 information.
                        //

                        DISK_EX_INT13_INFO ExInt13;     // If DetectionType == DetectExInt13
                } DUMMYSTRUCTNAME;
        } DUMMYUNIONNAME;
} DISK_DETECTION_INFO, *PDISK_DETECTION_INFO;

The documentation reads:

If DetectionType is DetectInt13, the union is a DISK_INT13_ INFO structure.

If DetectionType is DetectExInt13, the union is a DISK_EX_ INT13_INFO structure.

So it seems very likely that the original intention was for the DISK_INT13_INFO and DISK_EX_INT13_INFO to be placed in a union since they are mutually exclusive.

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There is a very specific difference between the behaviors: in the first case, neither Int13 nor ExtInt13 are initialized when a DISK_DETECTION_INFO is initialized. In the latter case, all four fields are initialized.

MSVC has a slew of quirky extensions, including variable sized arrays at the end of structs, for which the automatic initialization behavior may be undesirable.

EDIT: about "initialization":

Let's say the struct was

typedef struct _foo {
  int bar;
  union {
    struct {
      int baz;
      int wee;
    };
  };
} foo;

Then, writing foo x = { 1; } does not assign a value to baz or wee (they are technically indeterminate). If the struct was

typedef struct _foo {
  int bar;
  int baz;
  int wee;
} foo;

Then, writing foo x = { 1; } does assign baz=0 and wee=0

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Define "initialized"... If the object is created with a static storage duration I'd expect all fields to be zeroed (in the absence of a constructor) - in all other cases there would be no initialization, regardless of the union. –  ta.speot.is Sep 11 '11 at 6:50
    
variable sized arrays at the ends of structs are not msvc specific and there's no such thing here. Anyway, you never initialize one of these, the system returns one to you. –  David Heffernan Sep 11 '11 at 7:05
    
@David that's from your perspective. There are developers on the DDK side, and they actually initialize these structs. The system doesn't magically make these from thin air (although it would be cool if they could) –  Foo Bah Sep 11 '11 at 7:06
    
Regarding your edit - I'm going to need a link to the standard, since observation says otherwise. I just ran codepad.org/LIbVvpUc and codepad.org/kMeIUPfS under MSVC and got 1 0 0 for both. –  ta.speot.is Sep 11 '11 at 7:09
    
I think your comments would be better suited to the initialization of ADTs via their constructors - since they occupy the same memory space it is not possible to initialize both implicitly. –  ta.speot.is Sep 11 '11 at 7:11

Union is usually use to save spaces when a group of fields have mutual exclusive access. That is, when one active, the other must not. As opposed to allocating space for all fields, the space is allocated only for the largest one. The space is used interchangably with other fields. As stated in the link, depending on DetectionType field it's either Int13 or ExInt13 is active. Both use the same allocated space.

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2  
Actually, both Int13 and ExInt13 are within a struct in the OP code, so both have their own address and space. –  K-ballo Sep 11 '11 at 6:03
    
@K-ballo: why? the Int13 and ExInt13 are in a single struct, therefore they will not overlap. –  phoxis Sep 11 '11 at 6:10
1  
@phoxis ...that's why they "have their own address" –  ta.speot.is Sep 11 '11 at 6:12
1  
@phoxis: That was exactly my point, I guess I failed to express it correctly? Should have been adresses. –  K-ballo Sep 11 '11 at 6:13
    
i misread the comment, sorry for that, we are talking on the same point. –  phoxis Sep 11 '11 at 6:17

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