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I'm using Postgres and I'm trying to write a query like this:

select count(*) from table where datasets = ARRAY[]

i.e. I want to know how many rows have an empty array for a certain column, but postgres doesn't like that:

select count(*) from super_eds where datasets = ARRAY[];
ERROR:  syntax error at or near "]"
LINE 1: select count(*) from super_eds where datasets = ARRAY[];
                                                             ^
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... if datasets=NULL represents ARRAY[], the answers are OK... About about "ARRAY[]", it is a syntax error (!): as depesz answered, an empty array also need datatype, Rory's SQL script need correction, is "ARRAY[]::integer". – Peter Krauss May 12 '12 at 23:23
up vote 35 down vote accepted

The syntax should be:

SELECT
     COUNT(*)
FROM
     table
WHERE
     datasets = '{}'

You use quotes plus curly braces to show array literals.

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You can use the fact that array_upper and array_lower functions, on empty arrays return null , so you can:

select count(*) from table where array_upper(datasets, 1) is null;
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... ok if datasets=NULL represents ARRAY[], but and about "ARRAY[]", it is a syntax error (!). How to create a empty array?? – Peter Krauss May 9 '12 at 13:05
    
it's error only because it can't tell what datatype it's array off. add cast: select ARRAY[]::int4[]; – user80168 May 9 '12 at 19:48
SELECT  COUNT(*)
FROM    table
WHERE   datasets = ARRAY(SELECT 1 WHERE FALSE)
share|improve this answer
    
Although that might work, it just looks a bit messy. – Rory Apr 10 '09 at 14:08

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