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function getNews()
{
    $bloggerDataStr = file_get_contents("http://www.blogger.com/feeds/3018390933290471377/posts/default/-/comp?alt=json");
    $bloggerDataArr = json_decode($bloggerDataStr);

    $html .= '<ul>';

    foreach($bloggerDataArr->feed->entry as $entry)
    {
        $html .= '<li>';
        $html .= '<h1>'.$entry->title->$t.'</h1>';
        $html .= '<time>'.$entry->published->$t.'</time>';

        $html .= '<section>'.$entry->content->$t.'</section>';

        $html .= '</li>';
    }

    $html .= '</ul>';

    return $html;
}

I get "Fatal error: Cannot access empty property" in:

$entry->title->$t.

I believe my code is correct, I don't understand what is wrong. Help? Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

$t is a variable name in PHP. Try $entry->title->{'$t'}.

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This produces the same error –  Herbert Sep 11 '11 at 7:05
1  
My bad! I missed the single quotes around $t. :p +1 cos I'm an idiot. :) –  Herbert Sep 11 '11 at 7:14
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Try with a var_dump to check for the properties you are looking for

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This is actually not all that helpful, since the property is "$t". –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Sep 11 '11 at 6:57
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Probably this isn't the most elegant solution possible, but it works for me: Since the problem is the dollar sign in the name of the parameter, Try to substitute "$entry->title->$t" with $entry->title->{chr(36) . 't'}

Here's your edited code:

$bloggerDataStr = file_get_contents("http://www.blogger.com/feeds/3018390933290471377/posts/default/-/comp?alt=json");
$bloggerDataArr = json_decode($bloggerDataStr);

$html .= '<ul>';

foreach($bloggerDataArr->feed->entry as $entry)
{
    $html .= '<li>';
    $html .= '<h1>'.$entry->title->{chr(36) . 't'}.'</h1>';
    $html .= '<time>'.$entry->published->{chr(36) . 't'}.'</time>';

    $html .= '<section>'.$entry->content->{chr(36) . 't'}.'</section>';

    $html .= '</li>';
}

$html .= '</ul>';

return $html;
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Using chr() is completely unnecessary so long as you use single quotes to inhibit variable substitution. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Sep 11 '11 at 7:41
    
Yeah, that's true I added them because I'm used to put double quotes everywhere on my code, and I believed that using single or double quote would be the same (except having to push two keys on the keyboard instead of one). Infact before posting the code I have changed all the double quotes into single quotes :-) –  Cesco Sep 11 '11 at 10:07
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