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Can I close a file stream without calling Flush (in C#)? I understood that Close and Dispose calls the Flush method first.

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1  
Why would you want to do that? If you don't flush, you don't know what's in the file and what isn't - so you'd be closing it in an undefined state. –  tdammers Sep 11 '11 at 7:48
    
Do you mean you don't want the stream to flush even when you close it? –  Oded Sep 11 '11 at 7:48
    
What do you mean? You wan't to leave out a manual flush(That's possible since Close/Dispose call Flush) or do you want to avoid the automatic flush(Not possible, and a bad idea too)? –  CodesInChaos Sep 11 '11 at 7:57
    
Close does flush the buffer of the FileStream but not the buffers associated with any StreamReader/Writer which have a separate buffer. As long as you are reading there is no problem but if you use a StreamWriter or any other wrapper which has its own buffer you will get into trouble. –  Alois Kraus Sep 11 '11 at 15:19
1  
Environment.FailFast() works. Digging the private _handle field out of the FileStream with Reflection and pinvoking CloseHandle() works too, you'll have to catch the exception from Close() –  Hans Passant Sep 12 '11 at 13:21

7 Answers 7

MSDN is not 100% clear, but Jon Skeet is saying "Flush", so do it before close/dispose. It won't hurt, right?

From FileStream.Close Method:

Any data previously written to the buffer is copied to the file before the file stream is closed, so it is not necessary to call Flush before invoking Close. Following a call to Close, any operations on the file stream might raise exceptions. After Close has been called once, it does nothing if called again.

Dispose is not as clear:

This method disposes the stream, by writing any changes to the backing store and closing the stream to release resources.

Remark: the commentators might be right, it's not 100% clear from the Flush:

Override Flush on streams that implement a buffer. Use this method to move any information from an underlying buffer to its destination, clear the buffer, or both. Depending upon the state of the object, you might have to modify the current position within the stream (for example, if the underlying stream supports seeking). For additional information see CanSeek.

When using the StreamWriter or BinaryWriter class, do not flush the base Stream object. Instead, use the class's Flush or Close method, which makes sure that the data is flushed to the underlying stream first and then written to the file.

TESTS:

var textBytes = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("Test123");
using (var fileTest = System.IO.File.Open(@"c:\temp\fileNoCloseNoFlush.txt", FileMode.CreateNew))
{
    fileTest.Write(textBytes,0,textBytes.Length);
}
using (var fileTest = System.IO.File.Open(@"c:\temp\fileCloseNoFlush.txt", FileMode.CreateNew))
{
    fileTest.Write(textBytes, 0, textBytes.Length);
    fileTest.Close();
}
using (var fileTest = System.IO.File.Open(@"c:\temp\fileFlushNoClose.txt", FileMode.CreateNew))
{
    fileTest.Write(textBytes, 0, textBytes.Length);
    fileTest.Flush();
}
using (var fileTest = System.IO.File.Open(@"c:\temp\fileCloseAndFlush.txt", FileMode.CreateNew))
{
    fileTest.Write(textBytes, 0, textBytes.Length);
    fileTest.Flush();
    fileTest.Close();
}

What can I say ... all files got the text - maybe this is just too little data?

Test2

var rnd = new Random();
var size = 1024*1024*10;
var randomBytes = new byte[size];
rnd.NextBytes(randomBytes);
using (var fileTest = System.IO.File.Open(@"c:\temp\fileNoCloseNoFlush.bin", FileMode.CreateNew))
{
    fileTest.Write(randomBytes, 0, randomBytes.Length);
}
using (var fileTest = System.IO.File.Open(@"c:\temp\fileCloseNoFlush.bin", FileMode.CreateNew))
{
    fileTest.Write(randomBytes, 0, randomBytes.Length);
    fileTest.Close();
}
using (var fileTest = System.IO.File.Open(@"c:\temp\fileFlushNoClose.bin", FileMode.CreateNew))
{
    fileTest.Write(randomBytes, 0, randomBytes.Length);
    fileTest.Flush();
}
using (var fileTest = System.IO.File.Open(@"c:\temp\fileCloseAndFlush.bin", FileMode.CreateNew))
{
    fileTest.Write(randomBytes, 0, randomBytes.Length);
    fileTest.Flush();
    fileTest.Close();
}

And again - every file got its bytes ... to me it looks like it's doing what I read from MSDN: it doesn't matter if you call Flush or Close before dispose ... any thoughts on that?

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"Copied to the file" - isn't that exactly what flushing does? I read this as Flush() isn't called, but the buffer gets flushed anyway. –  tdammers Sep 11 '11 at 7:46
1  
the way I read that, you CAN'T close it without flushing. They flush for you even if you don't explicitly call it. –  Joshua Evensen Sep 11 '11 at 7:47
5  
Yes - you can call Close() without calling Flush(), but you can't close without flushing :) –  Jon Skeet Sep 11 '11 at 7:50
    
Ok - I think the great Jon will know it ... I will change my post –  Carsten König Sep 11 '11 at 7:52
    
Advice of the dyslexic dentist: Flush before you Close. –  lejon Jun 26 '12 at 7:20

I've been tracking a newly introduced bug that seems to indicate .NET 4 does not reliably flush changes to disk when the stream is disposed (unlike .NET 2.0 and 3.5, which always did so reliably).

The .NET 4 FileStream class has been heavily modified in .NET 4, and while the Flush*() methods have been rewritten, similar attention seems to have been forgotten for .Dispose().

This is resulting in incomplete files.

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Since you've stated that you understood that close & dispose called the flush method if it was not called explicitly by user code, I believe that (by close without flush) you actually want to have a possibility to discard changes made to a FileStream, if necessary.

If that is correct, using a FileStream alone won't help. You will need to load this file into a MemoryStream (or an array, depending on how you modify its contents), and then decide whether you want to save changes or not after you're done.

A problem with this is file size, obviously. FileStream uses limited size write buffers to speed up operations, but once they are depleted, changes need to be flushed. Due to .NET memory limits, you can only expect to load smaller files in memory, if you need to hold them entirely.

An easier alternative would be to make a disk copy of your file, and work on it using a plain FileStream. When finished, if you need to discard changes, simply delete the temporary file, otherwise replace the original with a modified copy.

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Wrap the FileStream in a BufferedStream and close the filestream before the buffered stream.

var fs = new FileStream(...);
var bs = new BufferedStream(fs, buffersize);

bs.Write(datatosend, 0, length);

fs.Close();
try {
    bs.Close();
}
catch (IOException) {
}
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I think it is safe to use simple using statement, which closes the stream after the call to GetBytes();

public static byte[] GetBytes(string fileName)
{
    byte[] buffer = new byte[4096];
    using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(fileName)) 
    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        fs.BlockCopy(ms, buffer, 4096); // extension method for the Stream class
        fs.Close();
        return ms.ToByteArray();
    }
}
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6  
Why are you calling Close in the middle? –  Jon Skeet Sep 12 '11 at 12:00

Using Flush() is worthy inside big Loops. when you have to read and write a big File inside one Loop. In other case the buffer or the computer is big enough, and doesn´t matter to close() without making one Flush() before.

Example: YOU HAVE TO READ A BIG FILE (in one format) AND WRITE IT IN .txt

 StreamWriter sw =  ....    // using StreamWriter
// you read the File  ...
// and now you want to write each line for this big File using WriteLine ();


for ( .....)    // this is a big Loop because the File is big and has many Lines

{

 sw.WriteLine ( *whatever i read* );  //we write here somrewhere ex. one .txt anywhere

 sw.Flush();  // each time the sw.flush() is called, the sw.WriteLine is executed

}

sw.Close();

Here it is very important to use Flush(); beacause otherwise each writeLine is save in the buffer and does not write it until the buffer is frull or until the program reaches sw.close();

I hope this helps a little to understand the function of Flush

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Welcoem to StackOverflow and thank you for the answer, but it doesn't really answer the question of "do I need to manually flush before closing" –  Deanna Mar 19 '14 at 10:05

You don't have to call Flush() on Close()/Dispose(), FileStream will do it for you as you can see from its source code:

http://referencesource.microsoft.com/#mscorlib/system/io/filestream.cs,e23a38af5d11ddd3

    [System.Security.SecuritySafeCritical]  // auto-generated
    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        // Nothing will be done differently based on whether we are 
        // disposing vs. finalizing.  This is taking advantage of the
        // weak ordering between normal finalizable objects & critical
        // finalizable objects, which I included in the SafeHandle 
        // design for FileStream, which would often "just work" when 
        // finalized.
        try {
            if (_handle != null && !_handle.IsClosed) {
                // Flush data to disk iff we were writing.  After 
                // thinking about this, we also don't need to flush
                // our read position, regardless of whether the handle
                // was exposed to the user.  They probably would NOT 
                // want us to do this.
                if (_writePos > 0) {
                    FlushWrite(!disposing); // <- Note this
                }
            }
        }
        finally {
            if (_handle != null && !_handle.IsClosed)
                _handle.Dispose();

            _canRead = false;
            _canWrite = false;
            _canSeek = false;
            // Don't set the buffer to null, to avoid a NullReferenceException
            // when users have a race condition in their code (ie, they call
            // Close when calling another method on Stream like Read).
            //_buffer = null;
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        }
    }
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