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Is there a syntax for RegExps that allows to repeat a group definition that appeared earlier in the same RexExp. Please note: I want to 'copy' the group definition again, I am not interested in backreference to the match of a previous group (i.e. "\n" is not what I am looking for).

For example: I look for a RegExp that will match "spamniceggs", "eggswithspam", "spamlovelyspam", "eggeggspam", but neither "spamwithham" nor "deliciousegg".

A possible PCRE RegExp would be:((?:spam)|(?:egg))\w*((?:egg)|(?:spam)) In this case and similar cases it would be nice to avoid explicit repetition of an identical group description (DRY). So I am looking for a hypothetical operator "~n" with a semantic as follows: Apply reapply the same group description as for the n-th capturing group. Thus the example RegExp could then be expressed as: (?:(?:spam)|(?:egg))\w*~1

Is there any way to achieve something along this lines?

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Do you mean something like qr// in Perl? –  Alexandr Ciornii Sep 11 '11 at 11:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is no facility for anything like this in either of the regex implementations you are asking about Emacs, but the surrounding language makes it easy enough. In Lisp:

(let* (s "spam")
      (e "egg")
      (sore (concat "\\(" s "\\|" e "\\)"))
      (regex (concat sore "[A-Za-z]*" sore)) )
  (... do stuff with regex ...)

In C, you can similarly build the regex in a string with e.g. sprintf.

Edit: Had overlooked ?(DEFINE) in PCRE. I'm leaving this in for the Emacs / general case.

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If you mean something like qr// in Perl, PCRE does not has it, use ?(DEFINE) and (?&). They are features copied from Perl 5.10 into PCRE. Example for IP address:

(?(DEFINE) (?<byte> 2[0-4]\d | 25[0-5] | 1\d\d | [1-9]?\d) )
         \b (?&byte) (\.(?&byte)){3} \b
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