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shortLinesOnly :: IO ()
shortLinesOnly = interact result
    where
        shortLength     = 11
        onlyShorts      = (<= shortLength) . length
        shortLines      = filter onlyShorts . lines
        result          = unlines . shortLines
        interact result = getContents >>= putStr . result

In the above code how can I write the interact function in point free style.

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Isn't it already point-free? –  Rhymoid Sep 11 '11 at 12:50
2  
Isn't interact already in prelude? –  delnan Sep 11 '11 at 12:51
    
@Tinctorius in the shortLinesOnly function interact is not point free. A point free function never mentions the actual arguments. The interact function mentions result. –  Vanson Samuel Sep 11 '11 at 13:00
    
@delnan you are correct. The interact is already in prelude. I am coming up with my own implementation to understand Haskell better. –  Vanson Samuel Sep 11 '11 at 13:02
2  
I believe Lambdabot can make things point free. –  Dan Burton Sep 11 '11 at 15:58
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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Step by step:

interact r = getContents >>= putStr . r
interact r = (getContents >>=) (putStr . r)
interact r = (getContents >>=) $ (putStr .) $ r
interact = (getContents >>=) . (putStr .)
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I prefer this version to mine :) –  Rhymoid Sep 11 '11 at 13:26
    
JB this is exactly what I was looking for! Thanks! –  Vanson Samuel Sep 11 '11 at 13:29
    
The step by step really helps. –  Vanson Samuel Sep 11 '11 at 13:31
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The best answer is: Don't. For this particular example the only change that would make is that your code would be less readable. Your original pointy variant is perfectly fine.

In certain cases it is better to avoid pointfree style. This is one of them, because your argument does not undergo linear data flow. It is rather used to build the data flow for something else. Example:

-- Bad: Pointy linear data flow description.
chunksOf :: Int -> [a] -> [[a]]
chunksOf n xs =
    takeWhile (not . null) (map (take n) (iterate (drop n) xs))

-- Good: Pointfree linear data flow description.
chunksOf :: Int -> [a] -> [[a]]
chunksOf n =
    takeWhile (not . null) . map (take n) . iterate (drop n)

-- Bad: Now exaggerating with pointfree style.
chunksOf :: Int -> [a] -> [[a]]
chunksOf =
    liftA2 ((.) (.) . (.) $ takeWhile (not . null))
           (map . take)
           (iterate . drop)
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1  
you are right point free style is harder to read in this case. I just wanted to know how to do it. –  Vanson Samuel Sep 11 '11 at 13:58
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This should do the trick, I guess:

interact :: (String -> String) -> IO ()
interact = (>>= putStr) . flip liftM getContents

Where liftM is from Control.Monad.

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Would interact = (getContents >>= putStr .) do the same thing? –  nulvinge Sep 11 '11 at 13:12
1  
That doesn't even parse, nulvinge. And even if you would add parenthesis to make a valid parse, it won't type check. What you want is that the argument to interact happens "between" getContents and putStr, and the only way to do that is to break the expression in half. –  Rhymoid Sep 11 '11 at 13:18
    
@nulvinge I wanted to do something like that however if you try it out you will see that it does not compile. –  Vanson Samuel Sep 11 '11 at 13:20
    
Thanks for clarifying. –  nulvinge Sep 11 '11 at 13:44
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