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I'm not sure if Ruby's File.open method isn't properly documented, or I'm missing something.

The File class inherits from IO, which is where the open method seems to be defined. As far as I can tell from the documentation, File doesn't seem to override IO's implementation of the open method.

The documentation for File documents the IO.open class method as taking a numeric file descriptor argument, presumably an object returned by IO.sysopen. However, the apparently undocumented File.open method will just take a filename.

For example, this fails and quite rightly so according to the documentation:

IO.open('data/actors.list') do |io| 
    #...
end

On the other hand, this works:

File.open('data/actors.list') do |io| 
    #...
end

The trouble is, File.open appears to override IO.open and has a different interface, but it's not documented --- or at least doesn't appear so.

Am I missing something? What's going on here?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The ruby documentation is wrong, File.open overrides IO.open in order to accept a filename:

http://www.ruby-doc.org/docs/ProgrammingRuby/html/ref_c_file.html#File.new

and

http://www.ruby-forum.com/topic/1731075#999707

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I'm glad I found this out as a newbie independently writing my first line of Ruby code! Is there anywhere where I can find more accurate documentation? –  Matty Sep 11 '11 at 13:41
1  
Note that it's correct on apidock. –  Dave Newton Sep 11 '11 at 15:07

I haven't dug in too deep into why Ruby-Doc.Org shows it that way (I don't use Ruby-Doc.Org anyway), but this is what RubyDoc.Info has to say:

Method: File.open

Defined in: io.c

  • (File) open(filename, mode = "r"[, opt])
  • (File) open(filename[, mode [, perm]][, opt])
  • (Object) open(filename, mode = "r"[, opt]) {|file| … }
  • (Object) open(filename[, mode [, perm]][, opt]) {|file| … }

With no associated block, open is a synonym for File.new. If the optional code block is given, it will be passed file as an argument, and the File object will automatically be closed when the block terminates. In this instance, File.open returns the value of the block.

Overloads:

  • (File) open(filename, mode = "r"[, opt])
    • Returns: (File)
  • (File) open(filename[, mode [, perm]][, opt])
    • Returns: (File)
  • (Object) open(filename, mode = "r"[, opt]) {|file| … }
    • Yields: (file)
    • Returns: (Object)
  • (Object) open(filename[, mode [, perm]][, opt]) {|file| … }
    • Yields: (file)
    • Returns: (Object)

This matches the RDoc comment in the file io.c in the YARV sources:

/*
 *  Document-method: File::open
 *
 *  call-seq:
 *     File.open(filename, mode="r" [, opt])                 -> file
 *     File.open(filename [, mode [, perm]] [, opt])         -> file
 *     File.open(filename, mode="r" [, opt]) {|file| block } -> obj
 *     File.open(filename [, mode [, perm]] [, opt]) {|file| block } -> obj
 *
 *  With no associated block, <code>open</code> is a synonym for
 *  <code>File.new</code>. If the optional code block is given, it will
 *  be passed <i>file</i> as an argument, and the File object will
 *  automatically be closed when the block terminates. In this instance,
 *  <code>File.open</code> returns the value of the block.
 */
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Is RubyDoc.info an accurate source of documentation, or should I just read the C source? –  Matty Sep 11 '11 at 13:43
1  
RubyDoc.Info is generated from the same C source, that Ruby-Doc.Org is. The main difference is that Ruby-Doc.Org is basically unmaintained for 6 or 7 years now, and has been known to be broken, inaccurate and outdated for at least that long. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 11 '11 at 13:47
    
I had no idea! I only found it through ruby-lang.org/en/documentation There should probably be a warning to that effect on that page! –  Matty Sep 11 '11 at 13:51
1  
@Matty: I've filed a bug report about this at github.com/ruby/ruby-lang.org/issues/15 –  Andrew Grimm Sep 11 '11 at 23:30
1  
@Andrew Thank you! –  Matty Sep 11 '11 at 23:38

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