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I get a this eror when visit the url http://localhost:3000/admin/login: ActionController::RoutingError in Admin/login#index

/app/views/admin/login/index.rhtml where line #18 raised:

No route matches {:action=>"login_in_user", :controller=>"admin/login"}

Extracted source (around line #18):

15:     
16: <h2>Login</h2>
17: <div class="spacer">&nbsp;</div>
18: <%= form_tag(:action => "login_in_user") %>
19: 
20: 
21:  <p>

Here is my Admin login controller class in controllers/admin:

class Admin::LoginController < ApplicationController

My route file:

namespace :admin do
  resources :login
end
match ':controller/service.wsdl', :action => 'wsdl'

# Install the default route as the lowest priority.
match ':controller/:action/:id'

I do have a action named: login_in_user

UPDATE OLD ROUTE FILE:

  map.connect ':controller/service.wsdl', :action => 'wsdl'

  # Install the default route as the lowest priority.
  map.connect ':controller/:action/:id'
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that you don't have any mapping for the url you're trying to create a link to. login_in_user is not one of the standard resource actions, so you need to add it explicitly. The relevant routes.rb entry in your case currently looks like this:

namespace :admin do
  resources :login
  # and other stuff...
end

It could work if you did something like this:

namespace :admin do
  resources :login do
    collection do
      post :login_in_user
    end
  end

However, remember that resources are not a good fit for all controllers. Creating a resources entry generates routes that map to seven specific actions, suitable for managing a resource. A "LoginController" with an action called "login_in_user" doesn't sound like a resource to me. It's possible you're simply trying to create a controller with specific paths to log in through different means. In that case, maybe you could create the routes like so:

namespace :admin do
  post 'login/login_in_user'           => 'login#login_in_user'
  post 'login/login_in_some_other_way' => 'login#login_in_some_other_way'
  # ...
end

Some of your other routes seem a bit off to me as well. If you haven't already, I'd highly recommend reading this rails guide: http://guides.rubyonrails.org/routing.html.

EDIT:

One thing I should explain just in case is that rails won't allow access to your controller's actions automatically. You always need to have an entry in the routes file for every url the user would need to access. In your case, you have a simple catch-all rule at the bottom that looks like this:

# Install the default route as the lowest priority.
match ':controller/:action/:id'

This is not recommended anymore, since it gives needless access to too many actions and no restrictions on the access method (GET, POST, etc.). Even so, if you want to install a catch-all route to your admin interface, you could do the same in your :admin namespace:

namespace :admin do
  match ':controller/:action/:id'
end

This should solve your problem in this case, but again, it's generally not a good idea. I'm under the impression that you're dealing with legacy code, so it may be a reasonable temporary fix, but I'd still create all the necessary routes by hand first and then think about how to rewrite the controllers to work sensibly with resources. As I noted above, for your problem, this should do the trick:

namespace :admin do
  post 'login/login_in_user' => 'login#login_in_user'
end
share|improve this answer
    
I have updated my Question with the old route file from rails 1.2.6. Do you know a smart way to rewrite it? –  Rails beginner Sep 11 '11 at 15:11
    
I've updated my answer, although I'm not sure if I understand what you're asking correctly. –  Andrew Radev Sep 11 '11 at 19:45

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