Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

According to the Microsoft documentation, when an unhandled exception occurs on a thread (from either the thread pool or created using the System.Threading.Thread class) the AppDomain.UnhandledException event should fire for the default AppDomain of the application. Here is the MSDN link which explains it after the second NOTE section.

But I cannot reproduce this behaviour, as far as I can tell from my test application it never fires the UnhandledException on either the default AppDomain or the AppDomain used to create the thread. Is the documentation wrong or my testing code?

using System;
using System.Runtime.ExceptionServices;
using System.Reflection;

public class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Program.HookAppDomainExceptions();
        Test t = CreateTestInsideAppDomain("Nested1");
        t.SetupNested1();
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    public static Test CreateTestInsideAppDomain(string appDomainName)
    {
        AppDomain nested1 = AppDomain.CreateDomain(appDomainName);
        string executingName = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().FullName;
        return (Test)nested1.CreateInstanceAndUnwrap(executingName, "Test");
    }

    public static void HookAppDomainExceptions()
    {
        AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FirstChanceException +=
            new EventHandler<FirstChanceExceptionEventArgs>(FirstChanceException);

        AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException +=
            new UnhandledExceptionEventHandler(CurrentDomain_UnhandledException);
    }

    public static void FirstChanceException(object sender, FirstChanceExceptionEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Domain:{0} FirstChanceException Handler",
                          AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName);
    }

    public static void CurrentDomain_UnhandledException(object sender, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Domain:{0} UnhandledException Handler",
                          AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName);
    }
}

public class Test : MarshalByRefObject
{
    private delegate void Nothing();

    public void SetupNested1()
    {
        var start = new Nothing(Nested1ThreadStart);
        start.BeginInvoke(null, null);
    }

    static void Nested1ThreadStart()
    {
        Program.HookAppDomainExceptions();
        Test t = Program.CreateTestInsideAppDomain("Nested2");
        t.SetupNested2();
    }

    public void SetupNested2()
    {
        Program.HookAppDomainExceptions();
        Test t = Program.CreateTestInsideAppDomain("Nested3");
        t.ThrowException();
    }

    public void ThrowException()
    {
        Program.HookAppDomainExceptions();
        throw new ApplicationException("Raise Exception");
    }
}
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In your code UnhandledException isn't fired on any AppDomain, because if you call a delegate using BeginInvoke(), any exception that is thrown during its execution is handled and then rethrown when you call EndInvoke(), which you don't.

If you either call EndInvoke():

start.EndInvoke(start.BeginInvoke(null, null));

or execute the delegate synchronously:

start();

You get similar results: UnhandledException of the main domain is raised.

If instead, you do what the documentation says and start a new thread using the Thread class:

new Thread(Nested1ThreadStart).Start();

UnhandledException of Nested1 and the main app domain are raised.

So, to answer your question: The documentation is right. Your code is wrong. When you call delegate asynchronously using BeginInvoke(), you should always call EndInvoke() later.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, I posted the same answer :) –  Hans Passant Sep 11 '11 at 14:54
2  
I would rather go for start.BeginInvoke(iar => start.EndInvoke(iar), null) because your usage makes the method call syncronous. Otherwise, excellent answer! –  Jonathan Dickinson Sep 11 '11 at 16:16
    
@Jonathan, yeah, that works too, but it changes the behavior. It calls EndInvoke() on the thread used to call start, which means is raises UnhandledException on Nested1 (and the main domain). –  svick Sep 11 '11 at 16:22
    
@svick - There is no point to EndInvoke(BeginInvoke) unless creating a sync version of a method that is naturally async. –  Jonathan Dickinson Sep 11 '11 at 16:37
    
@Jonathan, in actual application, there isn't. But this is not actual application, it's just code used to figure out how UnhandledException behaves. –  svick Sep 11 '11 at 16:55
show 1 more comment

I had this problem too. I used Observer Pattern to solve that. you can implement an interface in your caller class that have a method which call from the other thread when an exception occurs.

Here's a link that shows how to implement this pattern Exploring the Observer Design Pattern

share|improve this answer
    
That's not what this question is about. The OP (probably) knows how to handle exceptions if he wanted (or was able) to do it. The question is what happens to unhandled exceptions. –  svick Sep 11 '11 at 15:08
    
I'm sorry about my answer, you are right. –  amirhosseinab Sep 11 '11 at 17:28
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.