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I'm using sqldf to subset an enormous file. The following command gives me a data.frame of 100 rows and 42 columns.

first <- read.csv.sql("first.txt", sep = " ", header = TRUE, row.names = FALSE,
        sql = "SELECT * FROM file WHERE n = '\"n63\"' AND ratio = 1 AND r_name = '\"r1\"' AND method = '\"nearest\"' AND variables = 10")

The structure of the object is

'data.frame':   100 obs. of  42 variables:
 $ test_before       : chr  "TRUE" "TRUE" "TRUE" "TRUE" ...
 $ test_after        : chr  "TRUE" "TRUE" "TRUE" "TRUE" ...
 $ meanPSmatchRATIO  : chr  "1.54845330373635" "1.16857102212364" "1.25330045961256" "1.8011651466717" ...
snipped intervening normally printed columns
 $ PSdiff_DIFF       : chr  "-0.0103938442562762" "-0.00935228868105753" "-0.00947571480267878" 
snipped intervening normally printed columns
 $ nUNMATCHt         : chr  "0" "0" "0" "0" ...
 $ caliper           : chr  "\"no\"" "\"no\"" "\"no\"" "\"no\"" ...
 $ method            : chr  "\"nearest\"" "\"nearest\"" "\"nearest\"" "\"nearest\"" ...
 $ r_name            : chr  "\"r1\"" "\"r1\"" "\"r1\"" "\"r1\"" ...
 $ ratio             : int  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
 $ n                 : chr  "\"n63\"" "\"n63\"" "\"n63\"" "\"n63\"" ...
 $ variables         : int  10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 ...

Now, based on this you would expect that when I print the data.frame, all columns (except those int will be character (enclosed in "")). But you would be wrong!

  test_before test_after meanPSmatchRATIO del-  nUNMATCHt caliper    method r_name ratio     n variables
1        TRUE       TRUE 1.54845330373635 eted          0    "no" "nearest"   "r1"     1 "n63"        10
2        TRUE       TRUE 1.16857102212364 ...           0    "no" "nearest"   "r1"     1 "n63"        10
3        TRUE       TRUE 1.25330045961256 ...           0    "no" "nearest"   "r1"     1 "n63"        10
4        TRUE       TRUE  1.8011651466717 ...t          0    "no" "nearest"   "r1"     1 "n63"        10

Notice that only the last few columns are "character". I'm a bit lost at what's going on. Can someone explain?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure what you mean. Not quoting characters seems normal to me when displaying data frames at the console. It will quote the elements if I inspect a single column, but not the whole data frame. –  joran Sep 11 '11 at 15:09
    
The str claims that most of the columns are character. Including caliper, method, r_name and n. Yet only the aforementioned columns get printed with a ", all others behave as factor or numeric (or as is the case for first two columns, logical). –  Roman Luštrik Sep 11 '11 at 15:15
    
Those columns have embedded ". The first element of caliper is "\"no\""! –  Gavin Simpson Sep 11 '11 at 15:17
    
I edited the output of str(...) so at least the next reader can immediately see the important bits. (A similar operation on the object would have made this a more "minimal" example when it was printed.) –  BondedDust Sep 11 '11 at 15:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Looks fine to me. print.data.frame doesn't usually print quotes for character columns, but those last few columns have embedded quotes, so that's why they appear "quoted" by default.

Data <- data.frame(x=1:5,y=as.character(1:5),
  z=letters[1:5], q=paste("\"",letters[1:5],"\"",sep=""))
print(Data)  # default print
#   x y z   q
# 1 1 1 a "a"
# 2 2 2 b "b"
# 3 3 3 c "c"
# 4 4 4 d "d"
# 5 5 5 e "e"
print(Data, quote=TRUE)  # show embedded quotes
#     x   y   z       q
# 1 "1" "1" "a" "\"a\""
# 2 "2" "2" "b" "\"b\""
# 3 "3" "3" "c" "\"c\""
# 4 "4" "4" "d" "\"d\""
# 5 "5" "5" "e" "\"e\""
share|improve this answer

You are seeing the default behaviour of the print method for data frame objects. See ?print.data.frame, which has:

   quote: logical, indicating whether or not entries should be printed
          with surrounding quotes.

so if you want the printed object to be quoted, use quote = TRUE. E.g.:

> dat <- data.frame(X = c("A","B"), Y = c("1","2"), stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
> dat
  X Y
1 A 1
2 B 2
> dat[,1] ## not using the data frame print method...
[1] "A" "B"
> print(dat, quote = TRUE)
    X   Y
1 "A" "1"
2 "B" "2"

Edit: regarding @Roman's comment, the columns printing with quotes contain embedded quotes in the data. For example, the first element of caliper is "\"no\"", so it is the embedded quotes that are being printed and thus is fully consistent with the default behaviour of print.data.frame().

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