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Consider the following table:

 id | x  |  y  
----+----+-----
  1 | 10 | 100
  1 | 20 | 120
  1 | 30 | 130
  2 | 10 | 130
  2 | 20 | 130
  2 | 30 | 130
  3 | 20 | 130
(7 rows)

I would like to have a single arbitrary tuple of every id, with the corresponding x and y values. The following results are correct:

 id | x  |  y  
----+----+-----
  1 | 10 | 100
  2 | 20 | 130
  3 | 20 | 130

Or:

 id | x  |  y  
----+----+-----
  1 | 30 | 130
  2 | 30 | 130
  3 | 20 | 130

Neither id, x nor y are unique in any context.

How do I go about this in SQL (under PostgreSQL)? There might be some millions of ids.

Update:

Thanks, @Lukáš Lalinský. Quoting the PostgreSQL documentation you've linked to:

DISTINCT ON ( expression [, ...] ) keeps only the first row of each set of rows where the given expressions evaluate to equal... Note that the "first row" of each set is unpredictable unless ORDER BY is used to ensure that the desired row appears first.

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I don't understand the question. –  vol7ron Sep 11 '11 at 15:38
    
More, I don't understand what you're expecting and how you came to your examples. Your base table already seems to be a unique set. Are you just trying to randomly pick one record per ID? –  vol7ron Sep 11 '11 at 15:39
    
I would like to get a single arbitrary row for each id. That is, one row with id=1, one with id=2 and one with id=3. I don't care which row within the same id set is chosen. –  Adam Matan Sep 11 '11 at 15:42
    
Adam Matan, that makes sense, I'm curious why anyone would ever want that, though. –  vol7ron Sep 11 '11 at 15:53
1  
@vol7ron: I have occasion to need this sort of thing all the time. An application 'assumes' that two things are one-to-one, but the schema indicates otherwise. There's nothing in the spec for the application that indicates which of the many values should be preferred. –  IfLoop Sep 11 '11 at 16:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using the DISTINCT ON clause should do the job:

SELECT DISTINCT ON (id) id, x, y FROM table
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