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can somebody help me with the following piece of the code:

try:
    #do some things
    myClass.close()
except Exception, error:
    myClass.close()
    raise error

as You see I can't use here finally because in that case I will not know if an error actually occured, and I need to raise this error (raise error)

my question is how can I avoid using this two times myClass.close()? thanks in advance for any help

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3  
Please never re-raise exception in this way. Always use a plain raise for this purpose. Otherwise you lose the original backtrace which is pretty annoying in most cases. –  ThiefMaster Sep 11 '11 at 16:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is equivalent to your code:

try:
    #do some things
finally:
    myClass.close()

First it calls myClass.close() and if there was a error it is raised again.

You can also have this to handle specific exceptions:

try:
    #do some things
except Exception, error:
    raise # re-raise the original exception
finally:
    myClass.close()
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Use only raise to re-raise the exception instead of using raise error to keep the backtrace of the original exception. –  ThiefMaster Sep 11 '11 at 16:32

You can use finally :)

This should do what you want:

try:
    #do some things
finally:
    myClass.close()
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ok, but in that case, how will I receive an indication that an exception was raised? –  yeap Sep 11 '11 at 16:34
1  
@yeap: The exception will automatically be re-raised after the finally block finishes (if there was one). –  Dietrich Epp Sep 11 '11 at 16:41

You can chain try, except and finally since Python 2.5:

try:
    # Do some things...
    pass
except Exception, error:
    # Log the error...
    raise
finally:
    myClass.close()
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1  
Use only raise instead of raise error to keep the backtrace of the original exception. –  ThiefMaster Sep 11 '11 at 16:32
    
@ThiefMaster, you're absolutely right. Answer updated, thanks for the heads-up :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Sep 11 '11 at 16:34

Next to a finally (that would work) you could also use a context manager that calls your myClass.close() method on exit.

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Nest it.

try:
  try:
    ...
  except ...:
    raise error
finally:
  myClass.close()
share|improve this answer
    
Same thing here - use raise instead of raise whatever to re-raise an exception. –  ThiefMaster Sep 11 '11 at 16:32

Regardless this will not work. If you already raised an exception/error the first time you invoked myClass.close(), calling it again will be of no help. The error handling keywords are for implementing fallbacks, reporting and routing of the error-flow.

See here for error handling: Python Error Handling with try/finally

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