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I'm currently trying to develop a 3D table tennis game. My problem is that when drawing the table and racket, the table is currently overlapping the racket, which should be the other way round. Could anyone help please?

Heres part of the code:

   Model table;
   Model racket;

   Vector3 modelPosition = new Vector3(0,100,150);
   Vector3 modelPosition_table = new Vector3(0,40,0);

   // Set the position of the camera in world space, for our view matrix.
   Vector3 cameraPosition_racket = new Vector3(0.0f, 1000.0f, 10.0f);
   Vector3 cameraPosition_table = new Vector3(0.0f, 150.0f, 250.0f);

   void Draw_Racket()
    {
        // Copy any parent transforms.
        Matrix[] transforms_racket = new Matrix[racket.Bones.Count];
        racket.CopyAbsoluteBoneTransformsTo(transforms_racket);

        // Draw the model. A model can have multiple meshes, so loop.
        foreach (ModelMesh mesh in racket.Meshes)
        {
            // This is where the mesh orientation is set, as well 
            // as our camera and projection.
            foreach (BasicEffect effect in mesh.Effects)
            {
                effect.EnableDefaultLighting();
                effect.World = transforms_racket[mesh.ParentBone.Index] *     Matrix.CreateRotationY(modelRotation) * Matrix.CreateTranslation(modelPosition);
                effect.View = Matrix.CreateLookAt(cameraPosition_racket, Vector3.Up, Vector3.Up);
                effect.Projection = Matrix.CreatePerspectiveFieldOfView(MathHelper.ToRadians(45.0f), aspectRatio, 1.0f, 10000.0f);
            }
            // Draw the mesh, using the effects set above.
            mesh.Draw();
        }
    }

    void Draw_Table()
    {

        // Copy any parent transforms.
        Matrix[] transforms_table = new Matrix[table.Bones.Count];
        table.CopyAbsoluteBoneTransformsTo(transforms_table);

        // Draw the model. A model can have multiple meshes, so loop.
        foreach (ModelMesh mesh in table.Meshes)
        {
            // This is where the mesh orientation is set, as well 
            // as our camera and projection.
            foreach (BasicEffect effect in mesh.Effects)
            {
                effect.EnableDefaultLighting();
                effect.World = transforms_table[mesh.ParentBone.Index] *                                                              Matrix.CreateTranslation(modelPosition_table);
                effect.View = Matrix.CreateLookAt(cameraPosition_table, Vector3.Down, Vector3.Up);
                effect.Projection = Matrix.CreatePerspectiveFieldOfView(MathHelper.ToRadians(45.0f), aspectRatio, 1.0f, 1000.0f);
            }
            // Draw the mesh, using the effects set above.
            mesh.Draw();
        }

    }

    protected override void Draw(GameTime gameTime)
    {
        graphics.GraphicsDevice.Clear(Color.CornflowerBlue);

        Draw_Table();
        Draw_Racket();

        base.Draw(gameTime);
    }

If you would need any more of the code just let me know. Thanks in advance :)

EDIT...

@Pablo Ariel..ye I understand now and realized that instead of trying to change the camera, I could have rotated the racket at the x-axis, and managed to sort of get what i want, but now one prob is that the racket is a bit to big..heres the new code..

    // Set the 3D model to draw.
    Model table;
    Model racket;

    // The aspect ratio determines how to scale 3d to 2d projection.
    float aspectRatio;

    // Set the position of the model in world space, and set the rotation.
    Vector3 modelPosition = new Vector3(0,250,-25);
    Vector3 modelPosition_table = new Vector3(0,40,500);

    float modelRotation = (MathHelper.Pi*3)/2;

    Vector3 cameraPosition;
    Vector3 cameraTarget;
    Matrix mWorld;
    Matrix mWorld1;
    Matrix mView;
    Matrix mView1;
    Matrix mProjection;

    protected override void Initialize()
    {
        // TODO: Add your initialization logic here
        graphics.PreferredBackBufferWidth = 1000;
        graphics.PreferredBackBufferHeight = 500;
        graphics.IsFullScreen = false;
        graphics.ApplyChanges();
        Window.Title = "Table Tennis 3D";

        mProjection = Matrix.CreatePerspectiveFieldOfView(MathHelper.ToRadians(45.0f), 1.0f, 1.0f, 10000.0f);
        cameraPosition = modelPosition;
        cameraTarget = modelPosition_table;
        modelPosition_table.Z += 40;
        mView = Matrix.CreateLookAt(cameraPosition, cameraTarget, Vector3.Up);

        cameraPosition.Z -= 300;
        modelPosition.Y -= 100;
        mView1 = Matrix.CreateLookAt(cameraPosition, cameraTarget, Vector3.Up);



        base.Initialize();
    }

    protected override void Draw(GameTime gameTime)
    {
        graphics.GraphicsDevice.Clear(Color.CornflowerBlue);

        mWorld = Matrix.CreateRotationY(modelRotation) * Matrix.CreateRotationX(modelRotation) * Matrix.CreateTranslation(modelPosition);
        mWorld1 = Matrix.CreateTranslation(modelPosition_table);

        Draw_Table();
        Draw_Racket();

        base.Draw(gameTime);
    }

    void Draw_Table()
    {

        // Copy any parent transforms.
        Matrix[] transforms_table = new Matrix[table.Bones.Count];
        table.CopyAbsoluteBoneTransformsTo(transforms_table);

        // Draw the model. A model can have multiple meshes, so loop.
        foreach (ModelMesh mesh in table.Meshes)
        {
            // This is where the mesh orientation is set, as well 
            // as our camera and projection.
            foreach (BasicEffect effect in mesh.Effects)
            {
                effect.EnableDefaultLighting();
                effect.World = transforms_table[mesh.ParentBone.Index] * mWorld1;
                effect.View = mView;
                effect.Projection = mProjection;
            }
            // Draw the mesh, using the effects set above.
            mesh.Draw();
        }

    }

    void Draw_Racket()
    {
        Matrix[] transforms_racket = new Matrix[racket.Bones.Count];
        racket.CopyAbsoluteBoneTransformsTo(transforms_racket);

        // Draw the model. A model can have multiple meshes, so loop.
        foreach (ModelMesh mesh in racket.Meshes)
        {
            // This is where the mesh orientation is set, as well 
            // as our camera and projection.
            foreach (BasicEffect effect in mesh.Effects)
            {
                effect.EnableDefaultLighting();
                effect.World = transforms_racket[mesh.ParentBone.Index] * mWorld;
                effect.View = mView1;
                effect.Projection = mProjection;
            }
            // Draw the mesh, using the effects set above.
            mesh.Draw();
        }
    }

Should I make a new projection for the racket so that i change its size to half? I've tried changing its z position but no luck :/..thanks once again :) ps..heres a screenshot..http://i1099.photobucket.com/albums/g395/krt_ricci/3.png

EDIT... I've multiplied my world matrix for the racket with Matrix.CreateScale(0.5f, 0.5f, 0.5f) so that the racket is scaled down by half :)

share|improve this question
    
You have to make sure the rackets are closer to the camera than the table, so probably increase the z value. This would place the racket higher in the game word, this also works for 2d games (thats how is determined which picture overlaps which). –  MrFox Sep 11 '11 at 19:22
    
Which values would you suggest that I should increase cause I'm quite new at this and I've tried playing around with the values but it still didn't work? –  Kurt Ricci Sep 12 '11 at 0:37
    
I've rewritten some of your code, try to pay attention to what changes I've made and to understand why I made them. –  Pablo Ariel Sep 12 '11 at 2:45
    
You will probably get better answers about these topics on the game development site of stackoverflow it will be moved there eventually. –  Pablo Ariel Sep 12 '11 at 5:23

1 Answer 1

I believe this is wrong:

Matrix.CreateLookAt(cameraPosition_racket, Vector3.Up, Vector3.Up);

it should be:

Matrix.CreateLookAt(cameraPosition, cameraTarget, Vector3.Up);

A recommendation I would like to make is that you should not use so big numbers such as 1000.0f as positions unless of course this is required for your game architecture, but using a smaller scale is better because of float imprecision.

If you put the camera where the racket is then your camera may then be inside the racket and you won't be able to see it (because of backface culling you can't see faces from inside the racket)

Other than that, I can't figure out from this code what could be wrong, but the wrong view matrix could invert your z values in a way which messes up the depth buffer.

It's complicated because I don't understand what the camera vectors should be, you should use 3 vectors for the camera: cameraPosition, cameraTarget and cameraUp, then it will be clearer where you want the camera point to, and if you change the camera values you don't have to modify the matrix creation but just assign another vector.

EDIT: Look there are some things you have to change

First of all, calculating the view and projection matrix (which are the same for EVERY mesh in the scene) for each bone is very bad because generating the matrix is REAALLLLYYY SLOW SPECIALLY IN C# so you should manage to just do this: effect.View = mView; and the same with the projection matrix.

This is the reason of you error, because of generating the matrix so many different times, you are building 2 different projection matrices:

yo do this in DrawRacket():

effect.Projection = Matrix.CreatePerspectiveFieldOfView(MathHelper.ToRadians(45.0f), aspectRatio, 1.0f, 10000.0f);

and in DrawTable():

effect.Projection = Matrix.CreatePerspectiveFieldOfView(MathHelper.ToRadians(45.0f), aspectRatio, 1.0f, 1000.0f);

You're mapping the table mesh to 1 to 1000 and the racket to 1 to 10k Then all coordinates get messed up because of a single zero, when you need to use the same projection matrix for every object, so you should store it as a globabl variable or howeever it's handled in c# (a member variable or something like that)

EDIT 2:

Of course you MUST use the same camera for both objects!! if you don't then every object will be drawn as if the camera were in a different place for each!

This is your fixed code:

Model table;
Model racket;

Vector3 modelPosition = new Vector3(0,100,150);
Vector3 modelPosition_table = new Vector3(0,40,0);

// Set the position of the camera in world space, for our view matrix.
Vector3 cameraPosition_racket = new Vector3(0.0f, 1000.0f, 10.0f);
Vector3 cameraPosition_table = new Vector3(0.0f, 150.0f, 250.0f);

Vector3 cameraPosition = cameraPosition_racket;
Vector3 cameraTarget  = new Vector3(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);

Matrix mView = Matrix.CreateLookAt(cameraPosition, cameraTarget, Vector3.Up);
Matrix mProjection = Matrix.CreatePerspectiveFieldOfView(MathHelper.ToRadians(45.0f), aspectRatio, 1.0f, 10000.0f);



void Draw_Racket()
{
    // Copy any parent transforms.
    Matrix[] transforms_racket = new Matrix[racket.Bones.Count];
    racket.CopyAbsoluteBoneTransformsTo(transforms_racket);

    // Draw the model. A model can have multiple meshes, so loop.
    foreach (ModelMesh mesh in racket.Meshes)
    {
        // This is where the mesh orientation is set, as well 
        // as our camera and projection.
        foreach (BasicEffect effect in mesh.Effects)
        {
            effect.EnableDefaultLighting();
            effect.World = transforms_racket[mesh.ParentBone.Index] *     Matrix.CreateRotationY(modelRotation) * Matrix.CreateTranslation(modelPosition);
            effect.View = mView;
            effect.Projection = mProjection;
        }
        // Draw the mesh, using the effects set above.
        mesh.Draw();
    }
}

void Draw_Table()
{

    // Copy any parent transforms.
    Matrix[] transforms_table = new Matrix[table.Bones.Count];
    table.CopyAbsoluteBoneTransformsTo(transforms_table);

    // Draw the model. A model can have multiple meshes, so loop.
    foreach (ModelMesh mesh in table.Meshes)
    {
        // This is where the mesh orientation is set, as well 
        // as our camera and projection.
        foreach (BasicEffect effect in mesh.Effects)
        {
            effect.EnableDefaultLighting();
            effect.World = transforms_table[mesh.ParentBone.Index] * Matrix.CreateTranslation(modelPosition_table);
            effect.View = mView;
            effect.Projection = mProjection;
        }
        // Draw the mesh, using the effects set above.
        mesh.Draw();
    }

}

protected override void Draw(GameTime gameTime)
{
    graphics.GraphicsDevice.Clear(Color.CornflowerBlue);

    Draw_Table();
    Draw_Racket();

    base.Draw(gameTime);
}

UPDATE: try this:

 Vector3 modelPosition_racket = new Vector3(0,100,100); // former modelPosition
 Vector3 modelPosition_table  = new Vector3(0,40,500);

 // Set the position of the camera in world space, for our view matrix.
 Vector3 cameraPosition = modelPosition_racket;
 Vector3 cameraPosition.z -= 300;
 Vector3 cameraTarget   = modelPosition_table;

UPDATE: What you have to understand is for you to properly show the image what you are doing with modelPosition is translating every object from its local coordinate space to the global/world coordinate space (each model has its own modelPosition). There all objects share the same coordinate space and the same projection transform. In the global/world coordinate space you also specify the camera position, then build a matrix from the world transform values of the camera. If you want to move an object in the world space, you have to modify modelPosition.. this is not something i just "believe" is that way, that's how 3d works. If you modify other values to change the position of the object, such as the projection or view matrix, then that won't do you any good, because it doesn't work that way, all your math will be messed up and you won't be able to work properly.

share|improve this answer
    
First of thanks for replying. Those big values (1000.0f) are used so that the table positioned correctly. As for the last part, both the table and racket have different camera positions (would that be ideal?), and as for the cameraTarget and cameraup, I got them from a tutorial i found online (I'm new at coding with xna, let alone 3D) –  Kurt Ricci Sep 12 '11 at 0:32
    
It's ok to have many possible cameras but make a single camera vector for building the matrix, then assign ie. cameraPosition = cameraPosition_target; it's better because you then don't have to change the code in LookAt(). Also the table can be positioned correctly if you change the scale for all a elements. Do you have a screenshot of the problem? It could be from help too :) –  Pablo Ariel Sep 12 '11 at 1:13
    
This is the screenshot of my original code. If you look closely you can notice the handle of the racket just beneath the table.. i1099.photobucket.com/albums/g395/krt_ricci/Capture.png I've tried implementing your code but an error keeps popping up since I'm declaring everything outside a method.I'll try to arrange that and let you know if it works. Thanks once again :) –  Kurt Ricci Sep 12 '11 at 11:43
    
I've implemented your code and used the same camera for both objects but I still have a problem..i1099.photobucket.com/albums/g395/krt_ricci/Capture1.png I'd like the table to be the same view as the picture ive posted from the comment before this. I've changed the values around and managed this but then the racket changes too, and that was the original reason as to why I had two different camera positions. Any ideas please? –  Kurt Ricci Sep 12 '11 at 15:44
    
Yes that's very simple, you should do cameraPosition = cameraPosition_table instead of cameraPosition = cameraPosition_racket –  Pablo Ariel Sep 12 '11 at 16:08

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