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Given two binary search trees, print the nodes in ascending order with time complexity O(n) and space complexity: O(1)

The trees cannot be modified. Only traversal is allowed.

The problem I am facing is with the O(1)space solution. Had there not been this constraint, it could have been easily solved.

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what is n? the number of nodes? is the tree balanced/sorted? – Andreas Grapentin Sep 11 '11 at 19:19
    
yes is the answer – vastutsav Sep 11 '11 at 19:22
    
mhh.. is the parent of each node known? – Andreas Grapentin Sep 11 '11 at 19:56
    
root node of each tree is known. children of each node is known :) – vastutsav Sep 11 '11 at 20:00
    
phew, this one kept me busy for quite some time! very nice programming challenge :) thank you! – Andreas Grapentin Sep 11 '11 at 20:42
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The only way this can be done in space O(1) is if the nodes know their parent. Otherwise you cannot even traverse the tree unless there is some additional aid. However with this constraint it's again easy and back to tree-traversal, but without recursion. The tricky part is probably knowing which tree-path you came from when you go from a node to its parent (p) and cannot store this information as this would require O(log N) space. However, you know the last value you outputted. If it is smaller than the one of p, go the right, otherwise go to p’s parent.

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how to remember the parent of parent of p? – vastutsav Sep 11 '11 at 20:16
    
is stack being used to maintain the visited nodes? – vastutsav Sep 12 '11 at 4:04
    
The nodes know their parent. This must be in advance, so it won't count to your O(1) space requirements and then no, the stack is not used and you can implement this completely without recursion. See also en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_tree#Arrays for a way to store a binary tree without additional space requirements, where you can infact calculate the parent from the current node. – rumpel Sep 12 '11 at 6:43

if we're talking about BST's as defined by wikipedia:

The left subtree of a node contains only nodes with keys less than the node's key.
The right subtree of a node contains only nodes with keys greater than the node's key.
Both the left and right subtrees must also be binary search trees.

with the additional perk that every node knows his parent, then the following C code does the trick (I hope you like C, I have put quite some effort in these 300 lines of demo application :D)

http://pastebin.com/MiTGqakq

(note that I didn't use recursion, because recursion is technically never O(1)space. The reason for this that every function call uses copies of the passed parameters, thus allocating additional space, making O_space dependent on the number of calls -> not in O(1)space.)

EDIT: ok, fixed version is linked. have fun.

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I have solution of this problem. I have coded my solution in C#, because it is my strongest language, but I hope that you will catch a main idea. Let's suppose, that each tree node has 3 references: to left, right and parent nodes.

So we have BinaryTree. How could we print it? Obviously:

this._tree.Print();

That wasn't very difficult. But how could we build Print method, if we should avoid recursion (because the last one involves O(log(n)) memory)? Have you ever read about lazy lists (or streams)? Lazy list doesn't hold the whole list in memory, but knows how to calculate next item based on current item. In every moment lazy list allocates O(1) memory. So, suppose we have managed to describe lazy list for tree. Then Print method is very simple:

public static void Print<T>(this BinaryTree<T> tree)
    where T : IComparable<T>
{
    var node = new TreeNodeWalker<T>(tree.Root, WalkerState.FromParent);
    while (node != null)
    {
        node = node.WalkNext();
    }
}

During this code snippet you could find out one unfamiliar entity: TreeNodeWalker. This object holds tree node that should be walked, state that signals in what moment of traversing this walker was created and method which gives next walker. In short walker performs next actions:

  • If we drop in any subtree from parent node, we should walk left subtree.
  • If we emerges from left subtree, we should print node value and walk right subtree.
  • If we emerges from right subtree we should walk parent.

It could be represented in code in the next way:

public class TreeNodeWalker<T>
    where T:IComparable<T>
{
    // Tree node, for which walker is created. 
    private readonly BinaryTreeNode<T> _node;

    // State of walker.
    private readonly WalkerState _state;

    public TreeNodeWalker(BinaryTreeNode<T> node, WalkerState state)
    {
        this._node = node;
        this._state = state;
    }

    public TreeNodeWalker<T> WalkNext()
    {
        if (this._state == WalkerState.FromParent)
        {
            // If we come to this node from parent 
            // we should walk left subtree first.
            if (this._node.Left != null)
            {
                return new TreeNodeWalker<T>(this._node.Left, WalkerState.FromParent);
            }
            else
            {
                // If left subtree doesn't exist - return this node but with changed state (as if we have already walked left subtree).
                return new TreeNodeWalker<T>(this._node, WalkerState.FromLeftSubTree);
            }
        }
        else if (this._state == WalkerState.FromLeftSubTree)
        {
            // If we have returned from left subtree - current node is smallest in the tree
            // so we should print it.
            Console.WriteLine(this._node.Data.ToString());

            // And walk right subtree...
            if (this._node.Right != null)
            {
                //... if it exists
                return new TreeNodeWalker<T>(this._node.Right, WalkerState.FromParent);
            }
            else
            {
                // ... or return current node as if we have returned from right subtree.
                return new TreeNodeWalker<T>(this._node, WalkerState.FromRightSubTree);
            }
        }
        else if (this._state == WalkerState.FromRightSubTree)
        {
            // If we have returned from right subtree, then we should move up.
            if (this._node.Parent != null)
            {
                // If parent exists - we compare current node with left parent's node 
                // in order to say parent's walker which state is correct. 
                return new TreeNodeWalker<T>(this._node.Parent, this._node.Parent.Left == this._node ? WalkerState.FromLeftSubTree : WalkerState.FromRightSubTree);
            }
            else
            {
                // If there is no parent... Hooray, we have achieved root, which means end of walk. 
                return null;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
}

You could see a lot of memory allocation in code and make decision that O(1) memory requirement is not fulfilled. But after getting next walker item, we don't need previous one any more. If you are coding in C++ don't forget to free memory. Alternatively, you could avoid new walker instance allocation at all with changing internal state and node variables instead (you should always return this reference in corresponding places).

As for time complexity - it's O(n). Actually O(3*n), because we visit each node three times maximum.

Good luck.

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