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I'm curious why GCC shows me two identical warnings when compiling this file:

$ cat test.c 
#include <stdio.h> 

int main (int argc, char const *argv[])
{
    long foo = 0l;
    printf("%i\n", foo);

    return 0;
}
$ gcc-4.2 -Wall test.c 
test.c: In function ‘main’:
test.c:6: warning: format ‘%i’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘long int’
test.c:6: warning: format ‘%i’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘long int’

Interestingly, Clang also gives two warnings:

$ clang test.c 
test.c:6:14: warning: conversion specifies type 'int' but the argument has type 'long' [-Wformat]
    printf("%i\n", foo);
            ~^     ~~~
            %ld
test.c:6:14: warning: conversion specifies type 'int' but the argument has type 'long' [-Wformat]
    printf("%i\n", foo);
            ~^     ~~~
            %ld
2 warnings generated.

Any ideas?


For info:

$ gcc-4.2 -v
Using built-in specs.
Target: i686-apple-darwin11
Configured with: /private/var/tmp/gcc/gcc-5666.3~278/src/configure
--disable-checking --enable-werror --prefix=/usr --mandir=/share/man
--enable-languages=c,objc,c++,obj-c++
--program-transform-name=/^[cg][^.-]*$/s/$/-4.2/ --with-slibdir=/usr/lib
--build=i686-apple-darwin11 --program-prefix=i686-apple-darwin11-
--host=x86_64-apple-darwin11 --target=i686-apple-darwin11
--with-gxx-include-dir=/include/c++/4.2.1
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5666) (dot 3)

$ clang -v
Apple clang version 2.1 (tags/Apple/clang-163.7.1) (based on LLVM 3.0svn)
Target: x86_64-apple-darwin11.1.0
Thread model: posix

EDIT: the 'multi-architecture' hypothesis a few have suggested sounded good, but I'm not sure it's right. If I force a single architecture with -arch, I get two warnings. If I specify -arch x86_64 -arch i386, I get two sets of duplicate warnings!

$ gcc-4.2 -Wall -arch x86_64 test.c 
test.c: In function ‘main’:
test.c:6: warning: format ‘%i’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘long int’
test.c:6: warning: format ‘%i’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘long int’

$ gcc-4.2 -Wall -arch x86_64 -arch i386 test.c 
test.c: In function ‘main’:
test.c:6: warning: format ‘%i’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘long int’
test.c:6: warning: format ‘%i’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘long int’
test.c: In function ‘main’:
test.c:6: warning: format ‘%i’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘long int’
test.c:6: warning: format ‘%i’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘long int’

EDIT: I don't get dupes for all warning types. -Wformat is the only one I've come across so far. For example, if I throw in an unused variable I only get one warning for that:

$ cat test.c 
#include <stdio.h> 

int main (int argc, char const *argv[])
{
    long foo = 0l;
    long bar;
    printf("%i\n", foo);

    return 0;
}

$ gcc-4.2 -Wall test.c 
test.c: In function ‘main’:
test.c:7: warning: format ‘%i’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘long int’
test.c:7: warning: format ‘%i’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘long int’
test.c:6: warning: unused variable ‘bar’
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2  
FWIW, I only get one error message when I use GCC 4.1.2. Are you sure this isn't an artifact of your build system, which is somehow invoking GCC twice? –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 11 '11 at 20:07
    
Thanks Oli. I'm not sure at all, it probably is. :-/ –  Simon Whitaker Sep 11 '11 at 20:12
    
I'm not seeing the duplicate warning. But then, it's a warning you should be fixing anyway, so... –  Jonathan Grynspan Sep 11 '11 at 21:53
    
I get a single warning with gcc 4.5.2 and clang 2.8, both on Ubuntu 11.04. –  Keith Thompson Sep 12 '11 at 23:12
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is because Apple's stdio.h header attaches a GCC format attribute to its declaration of printf()...

(e.g. see the declaration of printf() here and the declaration of the __printflike() macro here)

...but GCC (and Clang, due to it trying to be very GCC-compatible!) already has built-in knowledge that printf() is a function which takes printf-style arguments. You're getting one warning due to the built-in knowledge, and a second warning due to the explicit attribute.

You can demonstrate the same behaviour on other platforms (with at least several versions of GCC) by doing the same thing yourself:

extern int printf(const char *, ...) __attribute__((__format__ (__printf__, 1, 2)));

int main (int argc, char const *argv[])
{
    long foo = 0l;
    printf("%i\n", foo);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant! Problem solved. (You can also demonstrate that this is the correct answer by removing the ` __DARWIN_LDBL_COMPAT(printf) __printflike(1, 2)` from the definition of printf in /usr/include/stdio.h then re-compiling.) –  Simon Whitaker Sep 13 '11 at 6:39
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If you're targetting two CPU architectures (ARMv6/ARMv7 on iOS, for instance, or i386/x86_64 on Mac), you'll see two copies of each warning because the compiler runs twice for each file (once for each architecture.)

On a Mac, you can get it up to 4 warnings per line if you enable PPC/PPC64 support. ;)

Edit: Matthew's got it spot-on in the accepted answer.

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It looks like you're compiling for iOS. The code is being compiled multiple times for multiple architectures. The warning is being generating for each architecture.

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1  
The multi-architecture explanation makes sense, but not sure it's the case here. If I add e.g. -arch x86_64 to my gcc or clang flags, I still get duplicate warnings. If I add -arch x86_64 -arch i386, I get four warnings. :) –  Simon Whitaker Sep 11 '11 at 20:15
1  
-1: evidently he isn't compiling for iOS, nor doing s multi-arch build. The compiler invocation is specified in the question. –  user23743 Sep 11 '11 at 20:32
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