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I am trying to create a linked list which will take user name, age and ssn number as a input and print the output in list format. I am getting some errors so could not get [input?].

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct person
{
    char *name;
    int age;
    char *ssn;
};

struct node
{
    struct person * person;
    struct node * next;
} *head, *element;

void insert (struct person *new_person)
{
    element->person = new_person;
    element->next = head;
    head = element;
}

void display (struct node *ll)
{
    if(ll == NULL)
        printf("empty list");

    while(ll != NULL)
    {
        printf("%s %d  %s ", ll->person->name, ll->person->age, ll->person->ssn);
        ll = ll->next;

        if(ll != NULL)
            printf("->");
    }
}

main()
{
    int total_no_person, i, page;

    printf("enter the total number of person \t");
    scanf("%d", &total_no_person);

    struct node * temp = (struct node *) malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    struct person * new_person;

    char *pname = NULL;
    char *pssn = NULL;

    head = NULL;

    for(i = 0; i < total_no_person; i++)
    {
        pname = (char *) malloc(100);
        pssn = (char *) malloc(100);

        struct person * newly;

        printf("enter the %dth person's name \t", i + 1);
        scanf("%s", &pname);
        newly[i].name = pname;

        printf("enter %dth person's age \t", i + 1);
        scanf("%d", &page);
        newly[i].age = page;

        printf("enter %dth person's ssn \t", i + 1);
        scanf("%s", &pssn);
        newly[i].ssn = pssn;

        new_person = newly;
        insert(new_person);
    }
    temp = head;
    display(temp);

}
share|improve this question
4  
What errors do you get? –  SLaks Sep 11 '11 at 21:05
    
program is terminating after taking one input –  learning_bee Sep 11 '11 at 21:06
    
Don't cast the result of malloc() please. Also, why main()? It's int main(), or int main(void). –  Kerrek SB Sep 11 '11 at 21:10
1  
@Kerrek: I never understood why people complain about it (malloc). it's totally harmless. –  Karoly Horvath Sep 11 '11 at 21:14
1  
@yi_H: it's also totally ugly. You can also sprinkle (void)0 and generously throughout your code, but it's just an eye sore, and it obscures what's going on. Just because it's possible doesn't mean it's idiomatic, so why not rid ourselves of the noise. –  Kerrek SB Sep 11 '11 at 21:27

3 Answers 3

There's .... a lot wrong here.

First thing that jumps out:

struct person *newly;
...
newly[i].name=pname;

newly is a person pointer. You never allocate a person, and then try and access it like it's a local struct (multiple times) as ... an array?

struct person *newly = malloc(sizeof(struct person));

is what you're looking for. You then would pass it to your insert function:

insert(newly);

new_person is redundant and doesn't do anything. Same with your node

You've also never allocated the head of the list itself. Your insert assumes there's a head ... that isn't there. You should set element to NULL, and check for that because if it's NULL ... it's your first insert to the list. (edit: Erm, well, actually head and ... reading it again I'm not sure what you're trying to do with element)

Honestly - I would suggest a bit of googling, or a beginner's C book. We can point out all the problems in your code, but without you having an understanding of what you're actually using you aren't going to benefit.

EDIT: With that being said, I guess it's reasonable to post a working example, salvaging as much of the original code as possible.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

struct person
{
    char *name;
    int age;
    char *ssn;
};

/* Note: because head and tail are global they
   are initialized to NULL automatically */
struct node
{
    struct person *person;
    struct node *next;
} *head, *tail;


void insert(struct person *new_person)
{
    /* allocate a new node */
    struct node *node = malloc(sizeof(struct node));

    /* assign the person to the node */
    node->person = new_person;
    node->next = NULL;

    if (head == NULL)
    {
         /* Since head is NULL, we are inserting for the first time.
            Set the head and tail to point at our new node */

        head = node;
        tail = node;
    }
    else
    {
        /* the tail is the last node in our list. We attach the new
           node to its next, then repoint the tail to our new node */
        tail->next = node;
        tail = node;
    }
}

void display()
{
    if(head == NULL)
    {
        printf("empty list\n");
    }
    else
    {
        struct node *current = head;
        while(current != NULL)
        {
            printf("%s %d  %s ", current->person->name, 
                                 current->person->age, 
                                 current->person->ssn);
            current = current->next;
            if(current != NULL)
                printf("->");
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}


main()
{

    int total_no_person,i;

    printf("enter the total number of person \t");
    scanf("%d",&total_no_person);

    for(i=0;i<total_no_person;i++)
    {
        /* allocate a new person, then allocate its members */
        struct person *newly = malloc(sizeof(struct person));
        newly->name = malloc(100);
        newly->ssn = malloc(100);

        printf("enter the %dth person's name \t",i+1);
        scanf("%s", newly->name);

        printf("enter %dth person's age \t",i+1);
        scanf("%d", &newly->age);

        printf("enter %dth person's ssn \t",i+1);
        scanf("%s", newly->ssn);

        insert(newly);
    }

    display();
}

The one extra bit I've left out is the part where you could overflow the input buffer with scanf - http://www.crasseux.com/books/ctutorial/String-overflows-with-scanf.html

share|improve this answer

Your element node is always the same you never allocate a new one, effectively overwriting the same thing again and again..

Of course it's a global variable so the pointer is initialized to NULL so it will crash on the first write.

share|improve this answer
    
but my code is crashing after taking one input…namely name –  learning_bee Sep 11 '11 at 21:10
    
well, if you fix it it will crash later, again ;) –  Karoly Horvath Sep 11 '11 at 21:11
    
Hm, time for some upvotes. Seems like this is going to be a large-scale effort :-) –  Kerrek SB Sep 11 '11 at 21:37

scanf takes a char pointer, not a char**:

scanf("%s", pname);

You are wrongly taking the address of the char-pointer pname when you write &pname.

share|improve this answer
    
in which case it would be probably a good idea to turn on warnings.. ? –  Karoly Horvath Sep 11 '11 at 21:12
    
"In which case"? It's always good to turn on warnings! :-) In fact, SO should have a policy, enforced under pain of permanent internet denial, that you may only post a question after you guarantee that you enabled all compiler warnings and made a reasonable effort to understand those. :-) –  Kerrek SB Sep 11 '11 at 21:16
    
so how can i write that?@kerrek? –  learning_bee Sep 11 '11 at 21:18
    
@learning: I say how to do it in my answer! Drop the & from the strings in the scanf calls. –  Kerrek SB Sep 11 '11 at 21:19
    
Yeah, they also should have an animal farm so they can kill a kitty each time you do it.. but more seriously, maybe a hint before posting (based on tags) would be nice. is it worth to ask a meta-question for this? –  Karoly Horvath Sep 11 '11 at 21:21

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