Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need class that has singleton behaviour.

What's the difference between using the Singleton module...

require 'singleton'

class X
    include Singleton

    def set_x(x)
        @x = x
    end

    def test
        puts @x
    end
end

X::instance.set_x('hello')
X::instance.test

...and using class methods and class instance variables?

class X
    def self.set_x(x)
        @x = x
    end

    def self.test
        puts @x
    end
end

X::set_x('hello')
X::test
share|improve this question
1  
IMHO the main difference is communicating the intent of what you are trying to do, which is more obvious if you include Singleton. –  Michael Kohl Sep 12 '11 at 6:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Nothing, as you wrote your code--but a singleton is a class that only allows a single instance. Nothing in the second code snippet disallows instantiation of multiple instances.

share|improve this answer
    
So in the first code snippet it's still possible to write 't = X.new'? –  AJM Sep 12 '11 at 0:38
1  
Seems like it'd be quicker to try it, no? But no, it isn't possible (at least without an error). The singleton part of it removes the new method from public view--that's why there's an instance method. An alternative would have been to have new return the single instance, but it's arguably less communicative. –  Dave Newton Sep 12 '11 at 0:46
    
Yeah, it would have been quicker to try it. I just wanted to make sure that that was the major difference. –  AJM Sep 12 '11 at 3:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.