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I have a sorted array of some indeterminate number of variables and counts thereof. I need to build a string like so:

Attribute[0]: p=2, e=8

My issue is the array is actually a pointer, and I don't want to use a loop of fixed length, so the only solution I see is to use an array pointer.

void printArray(Node_ptr node){
    int count=0; //character count
    char *temp= node->attributes; //duplicate attribute array

    char cur; //current char
    char *outputCat= emalloc(150); //concatenate counts to a single string

    strcpy(outputCat, "Attribute %d counts are: ");
    qsort(temp, lineCount, sizeof(char), compare); //sort the array

    while ((temp) != NULL){
        cur= *temp;
        ++temp;
        if (strcmp(&cur, temp)==0) //if characters are same
            count++; 
        else { //build reporting string
            strcat(outputCat, &cur);
            strcat(outputCat, "= ");
            sprintf(outputCat, "%d  ", count);
            count=0;
        }
    }
    free(outputCat);
}

The issue here is strcmp(&cur, ++temp)==0 is returning false every time, even when I see their values in the debugger. Because of this, the else conditional is constantly being built up and throws a segfault after a number of iterations.

Two questions:

1- What can make strcmp return non-zero even when identical values are entered? 2- What can I do to fix the code?

share|improve this question
9  
You shouldn't use strcmp or strcat on a char. Both arguments must be NULL terminated character arrays. That in itself could cause a segfault. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if fixing that fixes your code completely. –  Seth Carnegie Sep 12 '11 at 0:30
    
brain fart. I forgot characters can be compared directly without a function. Changing that didn't do anything, however, since the comparison always gets skipped over, even when cur is 'e', as is *temp –  Jason Sep 12 '11 at 0:37
    
well seth, that's the answer isn't it? You should re-submit as an answer so Jason can accept it. –  gnometorule Sep 12 '11 at 0:37
    
Update your code so we can see what still isn't working. –  Seth Carnegie Sep 12 '11 at 0:39
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your line:

strcmp(&cur, temp)

cur is a char declared locally, and therefore, &cur is just some location on the stack, and rather meaningless in this context.

I believe you mean to check if the current-character cur is the same as the next character *temp.
This would look like:

if (cur == *temp) //if characters are same
    count++; 

Next, I would look at massively simplify your output section:

sprintf(outputCat, "%c = %d", *cur, count);  // e.g.   "e = 8"
count=0;

And finally, I doubt your loop will ever terminate, as it continues to do temp++, while temp != NULL.
I believe you intend to check the VALUE stored at the pointer temp.
*temp should be properly checked against '\0', instead of NULL.
(\0 and NULL happen to have the same value, but they should not be treated the same semantically)

while (*temp != '\0'){

P.S. Your simple, but excellent comment "// if characters are same" was extremely helpful for me to understand your code. This is an excellent case of short, meaningful comments being INVALUABLE. Thank you.


(Hopefully final edit)
In total, the changes I recommend look like:

void printArray(Node_ptr node){
    int count=0; //character count
    char *temp= node->attributes; //duplicate attribute array

    char cur; //current char
    char *outputCat= emalloc(150); //concatenate counts to a single string

    strcpy(outputCat, "Attribute %d counts are: ");
    qsort(temp, lineCount, sizeof(char), compare); //sort the array

    while (*temp != '\0'){
        cur= *temp;
        ++temp;
        if (cur == *temp) //if characters are same
            count++; 
        else { //build reporting string
            sprintf(outputCat, "%c = %d", *cur, count);  // e.g.   "e = 8"
            count=0;
        }
    }
    free(outputCat);
}

How's that work out for you?

share|improve this answer
    
The `cur==*temp) line was the key. Right now, I have a couple changes to make, because the number of unique data points varies depending on the array. With both my original code and this one, it works for the first set of values, but if cur changes from e to p, the code doesn't adjust for it. –  Jason Sep 12 '11 at 1:38
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