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I was asked this as interview question. Couldn't answer.

Write a C program to find size of structure without using the sizeof operator.

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8  
yes - lots of we does –  Martin Beckett Sep 12 '11 at 3:37
3  
I think your interviewer is a bit goofy and you should be skeptical about working there. What does this accomplish? –  asveikau Sep 12 '11 at 3:41
1  
isn't it technically possible for the size of a struct to be smaller than the size it takes up in an array? –  Bwmat Sep 12 '11 at 4:36
    
@Martin ...I don't get it. :) –  muntoo Sep 12 '11 at 5:12
    
@muntoo - orig question just asked "does anyone knows how" –  Martin Beckett Sep 12 '11 at 5:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted
struct  XYZ{
    int x;
    float y;
    char z;
};

int main(){
    struct XYZ arr[2];
    int sz = (char*)&arr[1] - (char*)&arr[0];
    printf("%d",sz);
    return 0;
}
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3  
An array of one element (or a single object) is sufficient, since it is legal to compute the address one-past-the-end of an array. –  James McNellis Sep 12 '11 at 3:51
    
Would you mind explaining this? It's really interesting. –  Jorge Israel Peña Sep 12 '11 at 4:01
3  
@JorgeIsraelPeña: it just takes the difference between the memory address(the pointer) of the first element in the array and the address of the second element. –  Pablo Ariel Sep 12 '11 at 4:06
    
@Pablo: Thanks that's what I figured :) –  Jorge Israel Peña Sep 12 '11 at 4:09

Here's another approach. It also isn't completely defined but will still work on most systems.

typedef struct{
    //  stuff
} mystruct;

int main(){
    mystruct x;
    mystruct *p = &x;

    int size = (char*)(p + 1) - (char*)p;
    printf("Size = %d\n",size);

    return 0;
}
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What part of this program do you think "isn't completely defined"? –  James McNellis Sep 12 '11 at 3:50
    
I take that back. I was under the impression that doing arithmetic after typecasts was undefined. –  Mysticial Sep 12 '11 at 3:52
1  
You should use size_t but otherwise this is pretty completely defined. –  Chris Lutz Sep 12 '11 at 3:52
1  
@Chris: except that long long (and "%llu") weren't required by C89 :-) –  pmg Sep 12 '11 at 8:13
1  
@Chris: %llu does not even exist in C89. %lu with a cast to unsigned long is probably ok; it's the best you can do for C89. –  R.. Sep 12 '11 at 13:14

Here's two macro versions for the two forms of sizeof (takes a type vs. takes a variable) that you can use for all the code you'll never write where you aren't allowed to use sizeof:

#define type_sizeof(t) (size_t)((char *)((t *)1024 + 1) - (char *)((t *)1024))
#define var_sizeof(v)  (size_t)((char *)(&(v) + 1) - (char *)&(v))

Perhaps with some deep magic you can combine the two into a single macro that will almost serve as a drop-in replacement in all this sizeof-less code. (Too bad you can't fix the multiple-evaluation bugs.)

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For people that like C macro style coding, here is my take on this:

#define SIZE_OF_STRUCT(mystruct)     \
   ({ struct nested_##mystruct {     \
         struct mystruct s;          \
         char end[0];                \
      } __attribute__((packed)) var; \
      var.end - (char *)&var; })

void main()
{
   struct mystruct {
      int c;
   };

   printf("size %d\n", SIZE_OF_STRUCT(mystruct));
}
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Here is another approach.... no need to create any instance of structure.

struct  XYZ{
    int x;
    float y;
    char z;
};

int main(){
    int sz = (int) (((struct XYZ *)0) + 1);
    printf("%d",sz);
    return 0;
}

How does it work?

((struct XYZ *)0) + 1 = zero + size of structure
                      = size of structure
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