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Is there a string class member function (or something else) for removing all spaces from a string? Something like Python's str.strip() ?

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Just space characters or all whitespace? Python's strip removes whitespace by default –  Ray Toal Sep 12 '11 at 4:17
    
I want to remove all whitespaces. –  ApprenticeHacker Sep 12 '11 at 4:30

11 Answers 11

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You could simply do:

myString = myString.Replace(" ", "");

If you want to remove all white space characters you could use Linq, even if the syntax is not very appealing for this use case:

myString = new string(myString.Where(c => !char.IsWhiteSpace(c)).ToArray());
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String.Trim method removes trailing and leading white spaces. It is the functional equivalent of Python's strip method.

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Sorry, my question was a bit unclear. I intended to remove all spaces from a string. Still you deserve a +1. –  ApprenticeHacker Sep 12 '11 at 4:34

LINQ feels like overkill here, converting a string to a list, filtering the list, then turning it back onto a string. For removal of all white space, I would go for a regular expression. Regex.Replace(s, @"\s", ""). This is a common idiom and has probably been optimized.

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If you want to remove the spaces that prepend the string or at itt's end, you might want to have a look at TrimStart() and TrimEnd() and Trim().

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Yes, Trim.

String a = "blabla ";
var b = a.Trim(); // or TrimEnd or TrimStart
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Yes, String.Trim().

var result = "   a b    ".Trim();

gives "a b" in result. By default all whitespace is trimmed. If you want to remove only space you need to type

var result = "   a b    ".Trim(' ');

If you want to remove all spaces in a string you can use string.Replace().

var result = "   a b    ".Replace(" ", "");

gives "ab" in result. But that is not equivalent to str.strip() in Python.

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If you're looking to replace all whitespace in a string (not just leading and trailing whitespace) based on .NET's determination of what's whitespace or not, you could use a pretty simple LINQ query to make it work.

string whitespaceStripped = new string((from char c in someString
                                        where !char.IsWhiteSpace(c)
                                        select c).ToArray());
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2  
It should be noted that this one is different from all the other examples in that it removes all whitespace, not just spaces. This will also remove tabs, newlines, vertical tabs, probably other chars as well. –  Tremmors Sep 12 '11 at 4:21

I don't know much about Python...

IF the str.strip() just removes whitespace at the start and the end then you could use str = str.Trim() in .NET... otherwise you could just str = str.Replace ( " ", "") for removing all spaces.

IF it removes all whitespace then use

str = (from c in str where !char.IsWhiteSpace(c) select c).ToString()
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you could use

 StringVariable.Replace(" ","")
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Why ToString a string? –  Tremmors Sep 12 '11 at 4:20
    
sorry, typed that real quick –  AmitApollo Sep 12 '11 at 4:22

There are many diffrent ways, some faster then others:

public static string StripTabsAndNewlines(this string s) {

    //string builder (fast)
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++) {
        if ( !  Char.IsWhiteSpace(s[i])) {
            sb.Append();
        }
    }
    return sb.tostring();

    //linq (faster ?)
    return new string(input.ToCharArray().Where(c => !Char.IsWhiteSpace(c)).ToArray());

    //regex (slow)
    return Regex.Replace(s, @"\s+", "")

}
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Strip spaces? Strip whitespaces? Why should it matter? It only matters if we're searching for an existing implementation, but let's not forget how fun it is to program the solution rather than search MSDN (boring).

You should be able to strip any chars from any string by using 1 of the 2 functions below.

You can remove any chars like this

static string RemoveCharsFromString(string textChars, string removeChars)
{
    string tempResult = "";
    foreach (char c in textChars)
    {
        if (!removeChars.Contains(c))
        {
            tempResult = tempResult + c;
        }
    }
    return tempResult;
}

or you can enforce a character set (so to speak) like this

static string EnforceCharLimitation(string textChars, string allowChars)
{
    string tempResult = "";
    foreach (char c in textChars)
    {
        if (allowChars.Contains(c))
        {
            tempResult = tempResult + c;
        }
    }

    return tempResult;
}
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It does matter because this solution is extremely slow and inefficient compared to the standard existing techniques and implementations... –  19kt4 May 31 '13 at 4:04
    
Are we back in the 1970s with <10MHz CPUs again? How will you remain employable if MSDN ever goes offline? I suppose you've committed MSDN to memory! Wait a few more months and we'll see if the MS-"standard" is still the same! (:-D) BTW, the fastest solution is proper input-validation and data-structure design in the first place, not string manipulation to compensate for the habits of those who are enthralled by high-level functions that promise the world! It's probably a generational thing. I like to build it, you prefer to use it. The OP didn't indicate any emphasis on speed. (;-D) –  Sam Jun 5 '13 at 5:07
    
No, but if one of my devs spent hours writing a poor solution such as yours vs googling for an existing simple, fast & well implemented solution I would question their employment. Above you can see my answer that solves question in 3 different ways, all far more efficient then your proposed solution. In yours on each character in the input string you enumerate the allowedChars str (use a hashset<char> for O(1) instead of O(n) lookup). Not only that for each replacement you create a new string instead of a pre allocated array or StringBuilder. And you don't actually answer the question. –  19kt4 Jun 5 '13 at 8:23
    
I can discover electricity. You can switch on a light bulb (and play around with a variable resistor)! (;-D) –  Sam Jun 5 '13 at 13:48

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