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With this HTML

<div>
  <button>
    <img src="https://img.skitch.com/20110912-1m2qj31m7sxmh46uheef63gutu.gif">
  </button>
</div>

and this jQuery

$(document).ready(function() { 
  $("body").live("click", function(event) {
    $("body").append(event.target.tagName);            
  });
});

Why is the event target node in Chrome the image and in Firefox it's the button?

jsfiddle test -> http://jsfiddle.net/MikeGrace/YC5A7/

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1  
It's button in IE8 as well. –  Sahil Muthoo Sep 12 '11 at 6:01
1  
Oh noes! you're using live. That makes jQuery developers sad :( try delegate(). paulirish.com/2010/on-jquery-live –  Oscar Godson Sep 12 '11 at 18:51
1  
It's button in IE9 also. And check it out if you move the positioning a little. jsfiddle.net/gmaZG –  jvenema Sep 13 '11 at 2:15
1  
@OscarGodson As of jQuery 1.7, both .live and .delegate are converted into .on methods internally. However, it's still true that you're better off assigning .on to the closest DOM container (.delegate style) instead of the entire document (.live style) whenever possible. –  Blazemonger May 18 '12 at 13:40
1  
@Blazemonger yep. That was posted back in September. LONG LIVE on()! –  Oscar Godson May 18 '12 at 23:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This isn't limited to images, of course -- I tweaked your code at http://jsfiddle.net/YC5A7/13/ and got the same result with an ordinary hyperlink.

According to the jQuery docs, event.target "can be the element that registered for the event or a descendant of it." So your results are consistent with the intended purpose of that method.

However, event.currentTarget has the desired result in all browsers: http://jsfiddle.net/YC5A7/16/

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1  
Very interesting. Thanks for your help! –  Mike Grace Sep 13 '11 at 15:02

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