Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

In Python, None evaluates to less than zero?

ActivePython 2.7.2.5 (ActiveState Software Inc.) based on
Python 2.7.2 (default, Jun 24 2011, 12:21:10) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)] on win
32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> None < 0
True
>>> None == 0
False
>>> None > 0
False
>>>

Is this expected?

I would have guessed that None would either be equal to zero (through type coercion), or that all of these statements would return False.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by moooeeeep, FallenAngel, plaes, nvoigt, Jan Turoň May 25 '13 at 7:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

13  
For what it's worth, you can't do that any more in Python 3. It will give you this error: TypeError: unorderable types: NoneType() < int() –  NullUserException Sep 12 '11 at 6:12
    
@NullUserException: that's good to know. Because this is not the kind of intuitive behaviour that I expect from Python. –  Joachim Sauer Sep 12 '11 at 6:14
3  
Don't forget, even though it is dynamically typed, Python is still strongly typed: that is, no implicit coercions are performed. –  Daniel Roseman Sep 12 '11 at 8:16
1  
@Daniel They are if you compare a bool to an int (or at least so it seems) –  NullUserException Sep 12 '11 at 13:16
2  
To expand on @NullUserException, the bools are actually explicitly stated to be very thin wrappers around the integer constants 0 and 1 with special __str__ and __repr__. Math, logic and everything else works exactly the same on both, bool is even a subclass of int. That's as much of an implicit conversion as 1 + 1.0 resulting in a float. –  delnan Sep 12 '11 at 14:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

See the manual:

Objects of different types, except different numeric types and different string types, never compare equal; such objects are ordered consistently but arbitrarily (so that sorting a heterogeneous array yields a consistent result).

and

CPython implementation detail: Objects of different types except numbers are ordered by their type names; objects of the same types that don’t support proper comparison are ordered by their address.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the part where it says, "ordered consistently but arbitrarily." How useful... –  Mike M. Lin Sep 12 '11 at 6:26
3  
Yes it is. you usually want sorting operations to yield the same results every time you use them. –  ThiefMaster Sep 12 '11 at 7:13

It is intentional to make operations like sorting and dictionary comparison well defined.

[citing from the Language Reference]

The operators <, >, ==, >=, <=, and != compare the values of two objects. The objects need not have the same type. If both are numbers, they are converted to a common type. Otherwise, objects of different types always compare unequal, and are ordered consistently but arbitrary.

share|improve this answer

From the docs:

CPython implementation detail: Objects of different types except numbers are ordered by their type names; objects of the same types that don’t support proper comparison are ordered by their address.

NoneType compares as smaller than int since the comparison appears to be case-sensitive.

>>> type(0)
<type 'int'>
>>> type(None)
<type 'NoneType'>
>>> 'NoneType' < 'int'
True
share|improve this answer
3  
This can't be right, since print(5 > {}) gives you false, and int > dict –  NullUserException Sep 12 '11 at 6:16
    
@NullUserException: Interesting. That would seem to contradict the documentation, unless I'm missing something. –  hammar Sep 12 '11 at 6:22
    
@NullUserException: type(5) > type({}) gives false, so that part is consistent, though I'm not sure why they compare that way when, as you said, int > dict. However, type(None) > type(0). Hmm.... –  hammar Sep 12 '11 at 6:31
    
@NullUserException @hammar - I get int < dict here, on Python 2.6.6. But also the inconsistent type(None) > type(0) but None < 0... –  detly Sep 12 '11 at 6:52
    
@NullUserException: The doc says "Objects of different types except numbers" (emphasis mine). –  Marco Leogrande Jul 28 at 23:58

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.