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I am making my first attempt at using threads in an application, but on the line where I try to instantiate my thread I get the error 'method name expected'. Here is my code :

private static List<Field.Info> FromDatabase(this Int32 _campId)
    {
        List<Field.Info> lstFields = new List<Field.Info>();

        Field.List.Response response = new Field.List.Ticket
        {
            campId = _campId
        }.Commit();

        if (response.status == Field.List.Status.success)
        {
            lstFields = response.fields;
            lock (campIdLock)
            {
                loadedCampIds.Add(_campId);
            }
        }

        if (response.status == Field.List.Status.retry)
        {
            Thread th1 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(FromDatabase(_campId)));

            th1.Start();

        }

        return lstFields;
    }
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Don't use Threads, use Tasks (TPL) –  Henk Holterman Sep 12 '11 at 7:53
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4 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

ThreadStart constructor only accepts method name. You're executing the method there. Change it to Thread th1 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(FromDatabase));

However that would be incorrect since FromDatabase method appears to be taking parameter while ThreadStart expects method with no parameters so you should be using instead ParameterizedThreadStart

Read the following article for more detail: http://www.dotnetperls.com/parameterizedthreadstart

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You're not creating a delegate, you're actually calling the FromDatabase method.

The right solution is by using a parameterized thread start Try this, you'll need to change the signature of FromDatabase though:

private static List<Field.Info> FromDatabase(this Int32 _campId)
{
    List<Field.Info> lstFields = new List<Field.Info>();

    Field.List.Response response = new Field.List.Ticket
    {
        campId = _campId
    }.Commit();

    if (response.status == Field.List.Status.success)
    {
        lstFields = response.fields;
        lock (campIdLock)
        {
            loadedCampIds.Add(_campId);
        }
    }

    if (response.status == Field.List.Status.retry)
    {
        Thread th1 = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(FromDatabase));

        th1.Start(_campId);

    }

    return lstFields;
}
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Change the method signature to take an object that you cast to an int. then change your call to have the method name only. So something like the below

private static List<Field.Info> FromDatabase(this object _campId)
{
    int _campIdInt = (int)_campId;
    List<Field.Info> lstFields = new List<Field.Info>();

    Field.List.Response response = new Field.List.Ticket
    {
        campId = _campIdInt
    }.Commit();

    if (response.status == Field.List.Status.success)
    {
        lstFields = response.fields;
        lock (campIdLock)
        {
            loadedCampIds.Add(_campIdInt);
        }
    }

    if (response.status == Field.List.Status.retry)
    {
        Thread th1 = new Thread(FromDatabase);

        th1.Start(_campIdInt);

    }

    return lstFields;
}
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I tend to prefer using lambda expressions and closures like the following to start a thread with parameters as opposed to using ParameterizedThreadStart.

new Thread(() => FromDatabase(_campId)).Start();

There are a couple of advantages:

  • The target method can have more than one parameter.
  • Those parameters can be strongly-typed.

ParameterizedThreadStart only allows a single object parameter.

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Personally I think this is kinda a hack to avoid to follow the design pattern. –  Aidiakapi Sep 13 '11 at 7:12
    
@Aidiakapi: Which design pattern? –  Brian Gideon Sep 13 '11 at 16:08
    
Hard to explain, but the developers of the .Net libs chose to make it the way it is, for a reason. Imho this is just a hacky solution. This is basically against the way they designed these classes before making them. –  Aidiakapi Sep 14 '11 at 12:19
    
@Aidiakapi: There are a lot of things in the BCL that Microsoft wishes they could take back. In light of what lambda expressions enable you to do and the advantages of using them in this particular scenario it is a reasonable argument that ParameterizedThreadStart is something they wish they could take back or do differently. That is pure speculation on my part. What is not speculation is that ParameterizedThreadStart is a suboptimal parameter passing strategy. –  Brian Gideon Sep 14 '11 at 13:45
    
I agree on that ParameterizedThreadStart is nowhere near ideal (nor lots of other classes in the BCL). But I think lambda's in multithreading can fuzz the code concerned to thread-safety, that's why I dislike this approach, but you're right, passing a manual state object into the method is not better than using a lambda. This just seems to be making the debugging more difficult when the example gets more advanced. I also wonder why nobody pointed out that making a new thread to query the database once is not very efficient, then the ThreadPool/async operations are more suitable. –  Aidiakapi Sep 15 '11 at 9:34
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