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I have a method accepting a lambda which will be called or a string which will be evaluated. Why does the following method fail:

def test(expr)
  expr = expr.respond_to?(:call) ? expr : ->{ eval(expr) }
  expr.call
end

test 'puts 1'
# => TypeError: can't convert Proc into String

But this one work:

def test(expr)
  foo = expr
  expr = expr.respond_to?(:call) ? expr : ->{ eval(foo) }
  expr.call
end

test 'puts 1'
# => 1
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Typo? Really spelled epr? –  Ray Toal Sep 12 '11 at 7:46
    
Yeah typo, fixed. –  ream88 Sep 12 '11 at 8:04
1  
Just making sure. Glad to see you got two good answers. –  Ray Toal Sep 12 '11 at 8:13
    
@Ray: It wouldn't have been nearly as much fun if it was just a typo. –  mu is too short Sep 12 '11 at 8:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In here:

expr = expr.respond_to?(:call) ? expr : ->{ eval(expr) }

You end up with a Proc in expr that is a closure over expr so when the Proc is evaluated, it tries to eval itself because the expr inside the lambda is the lambda itself.

In here:

foo  = expr
expr = expr.respond_to?(:call) ? expr : ->{ eval(foo) }

the closure is over foo which refers to the original String value of expr so there is no funky self-referential confusion and you'll end up using eval on a String.

share|improve this answer
    
Got it! Thank you. –  ream88 Sep 12 '11 at 8:06
    
@ream88: Victor was in first so you should give him the checkmark (I won't take it personally, honest), I was just trying clarify what was going on. –  mu is too short Sep 12 '11 at 8:10
    
+1 for calling out "self-referential". (Also upvoted Victor for being correct and first.) –  Ray Toal Sep 12 '11 at 8:15
    
Yeah, but your answer is much easier to understand ;) (Upvoted victors answer) –  ream88 Sep 12 '11 at 8:34

You are assigning lambda to variable expr. That lambda tries to eval content of variable expr (i.e. tries to eval itself). eval expects only string, that is why exception is raised.

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