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I need a byte generator that would generate values from Byte.MIN_VALUE to Byte.MAX_VALUE. When it reaches MAX_VALUE, it should start over again from MIN_VALUE.

I have written the code using AtomicInteger (see below); however, the code does not seem to behave properly if accessed concurrently and if made artificially slow with Thread.sleep() (if no sleeping, it runs fine; however, I suspect it is just too fast for concurrency problems to show up).

The code (with some added debug code):

public class ByteGenerator {

    private static final int INITIAL_VALUE = Byte.MIN_VALUE-1;

    private AtomicInteger counter = new AtomicInteger(INITIAL_VALUE);
    private AtomicInteger resetCounter = new AtomicInteger(0);

    private boolean isSlow = false;
    private long startTime;

    public byte nextValue() {
        int next = counter.incrementAndGet();
        //if (isSlow) slowDown(5);
        if (next > Byte.MAX_VALUE) {
            synchronized(counter) {
                int i = counter.get();
                //if value is still larger than max byte value, we reset it
                if (i > Byte.MAX_VALUE) {
                    counter.set(INITIAL_VALUE);
                    resetCounter.incrementAndGet();
                    if (isSlow) slowDownAndLog(10, "resetting");
                } else {
                    if (isSlow) slowDownAndLog(1, "missed");
                }
                next = counter.incrementAndGet();
            }
        }
        return (byte) next;
    }

    private void slowDown(long millis) {
        try {
            Thread.sleep(millis);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        }
    }
    private void slowDownAndLog(long millis, String msg) {
        slowDown(millis);
        System.out.println(resetCounter + " " 
                           + (System.currentTimeMillis()-startTime) + " "
                           + Thread.currentThread().getName() + ": " + msg);
    }

    public void setSlow(boolean isSlow) {
        this.isSlow = isSlow;
    }
    public void setStartTime(long startTime) {
        this.startTime = startTime;
    }

}

And, the test:

public class ByteGeneratorTest {

    @Test
    public void testGenerate() throws Exception {
        ByteGenerator g = new ByteGenerator();
        for (int n = 0; n < 10; n++) {
            for (int i = Byte.MIN_VALUE; i <= Byte.MAX_VALUE; i++) {
                assertEquals(i, g.nextValue());
            }
        }
    }

    @Test
    public void testGenerateMultiThreaded() throws Exception {
        final ByteGenerator g = new ByteGenerator();
        g.setSlow(true);
        final AtomicInteger[] counters = new AtomicInteger[Byte.MAX_VALUE-Byte.MIN_VALUE+1];
        for (int i = 0; i < counters.length; i++) {
            counters[i] = new AtomicInteger(0);
        }
        Thread[] threads = new Thread[100];
        final CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(threads.length);
        for (int i = 0; i < threads.length; i++) {
            threads[i] = new Thread(new Runnable() {
                public void run() {
                    try {
                        for (int i = Byte.MIN_VALUE; i <= Byte.MAX_VALUE; i++) {
                            byte value = g.nextValue();
                            counters[value-Byte.MIN_VALUE].incrementAndGet();
                        }
                    } finally {
                        latch.countDown();
                    }
                }
            }, "generator-client-" + i);
            threads[i].setDaemon(true);
        }
        g.setStartTime(System.currentTimeMillis());
        for (int i = 0; i < threads.length; i++) {
            threads[i].start();
        }
        latch.await();
        for (int i = 0; i < counters.length; i++) {
            System.out.println("value #" + (i+Byte.MIN_VALUE) + ": " + counters[i].get());
        }
        //print out the number of hits for each value
        for (int i = 0; i < counters.length; i++) {
            assertEquals("value #" + (i+Byte.MIN_VALUE), threads.length, counters[i].get());
        }
    }

}

The result on my 2-core machine is that value #-128 gets 146 hits (all of them should get 100 hits equally as we have 100 threads).

If anyone has any ideas, what's wrong with this code, I'm all ears/eyes.

UPDATE: for those who are in a hurry and do not want to scroll down, the correct (and shortest and most elegant) way to solve this in Java would be like this:

public byte nextValue() {
   return (byte) counter.incrementAndGet();
}

Thanks, Heinz!

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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You make the decision to incrementAndGet() based on a old value of counter.get(). The value of the counter can reach MAX_VALUE again before you do the incrementAndGet() operation on the counter.

if (next > Byte.MAX_VALUE) {
    synchronized(counter) {
        int i = counter.get(); //here You make sure the the counter is not over the MAX_VALUE
        if (i > Byte.MAX_VALUE) {
            counter.set(INITIAL_VALUE);
            resetCounter.incrementAndGet();
            if (isSlow) slowDownAndLog(10, "resetting");
        } else {
            if (isSlow) slowDownAndLog(1, "missed"); //the counter can reach MAX_VALUE again if you wait here long enough
        }
        next = counter.incrementAndGet(); //here you increment on return the counter that can reach >MAX_VALUE in the meantime
    }
}

To make it work one has to make sure the no decisions are made on stale info. Either reset the counter or return the old value.

public byte nextValue() {
    int next = counter.incrementAndGet();

    if (next > Byte.MAX_VALUE) {
        synchronized(counter) {
            next = counter.incrementAndGet();
            //if value is still larger than max byte value, we reset it
            if (next > Byte.MAX_VALUE) {
                counter.set(INITIAL_VALUE + 1);
                next = INITIAL_VALUE + 1;
                resetCounter.incrementAndGet();
                if (isSlow) slowDownAndLog(10, "resetting");
            } else {
                if (isSlow) slowDownAndLog(1, "missed");
            }
        }
    }

    return (byte) next;
}
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Initially, Java stored all fields as 4 or 8 byte values, even short and byte. Operations on the fields would simply do bit masking to shrink the bytes. Thus we could very easily do this:

public byte nextValue() {
   return (byte) counter.incrementAndGet();
}

Fun little puzzle, thanks Neeme :-)

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Your synchronized block contains only the if body. It should wrap whole method including if statement itself. Or just make your method nextValue synchronized. BTW in this case you do not need Atomic variables at all.

I hope this will work for you. Try to use Atomic variables only if your really need highest performance code, i.e. synchronized statement bothers you. IMHO in most cases it does not.

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Your answer does not explain why the current approach does not work. My understanding is that it should work: it uses atomic variable when it is not synchronized and synchronizes when performing non-atomic operations - so why doesn't it work? –  Neeme Praks Sep 12 '11 at 8:34
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If I understand you correctly, you care that the results of nextValue are in the range of Byte.MIN_VALUE and Byte.MAX_VALUE and you don't care about the value stored in the counter. Then you can map integers on bytes such that you required enumeration behavior is exposed:

private static final int VALUE_RANGE = Byte.MAX_VALUE - Byte.MIN_VALUE + 1;
private final AtomicInteger counter = new AtomicInteger(0);

public byte nextValue() {
   return (byte) (counter.incrementAndGet() % VALUE_RANGE + Byte.MIN_VALUE - 1);
}

Beware, this is untested code. But the idea should work.

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While this is a very neat idea (howcome I didn't think of it :-P) and it actually works - it still does not explain why my original solution doesn't work. –  Neeme Praks Sep 12 '11 at 9:58
    
Well, in your original solution is the following flaw. It is possible that a context switch between the first incrementAndGet() and the synchronized block happens. I.e. two threads get a next value which is beyond Byte.MAX_VALUE. One of those threads will reset the counter, the other will return a value too large. –  jmg Sep 12 '11 at 11:50
    
Nope, if both get a value too large, the first will reset the counter and the next will just get a new value from (already reset) counter. –  Neeme Praks Sep 12 '11 at 12:11
    
Ok, but still. Why trying to correct a way to complex way of doing things instead of using an obviously correct solution. –  jmg Sep 12 '11 at 12:14
    
Well, I want to understand what is going on here. I already updated my code to use your brilliantly simple approach (with AtomicLong instead of AtomicInteger - to avoid overflow); however, for me it is important to understand why this seemingly correct code does not work. If we will not get to the bottom of this, we have learned nothing from all this (other than just blindly following the advice of "synchronize everything!"). –  Neeme Praks Sep 12 '11 at 12:22
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I coded up the following version of nextValue using compareAndSet which is designed to be used in a non-synchronized block. It passed your unit tests:

Oh, and I introduced new constants for MIN_VALUE and MAX_VALUE but you can ignore those if you prefer.

static final int LOWEST_VALUE = Byte.MIN_VALUE;
static final int HIGHEST_VALUE = Byte.MAX_VALUE;

private AtomicInteger counter = new AtomicInteger(LOWEST_VALUE - 1);
private AtomicInteger resetCounter = new AtomicInteger(0);

public byte nextValue() {
    int oldValue; 
    int newValue; 

    do {
        oldValue = counter.get();
        if (oldValue >= HIGHEST_VALUE) {
            newValue = LOWEST_VALUE;
            resetCounter.incrementAndGet();
            if (isSlow) slowDownAndLog(10, "resetting");
        } else {
            newValue = oldValue + 1;    
            if (isSlow) slowDownAndLog(1, "missed");
        }
    } while (!counter.compareAndSet(oldValue, newValue));
    return (byte) newValue;
}

compareAndSet() works in conjunction with get() to manage concurrency.

At the start of your critical section, you perform a get() to retrieve the old value. You then perform some function dependent only on the old value to compute a new value. Then you use compareAndSet() to set the new value. If the AtomicInteger is no longer equal to the old value at the time compareAndSet() is executed (because of concurrent activity), it fails and you must start over.

If you have an extreme amount of concurrency and the computation time is long, it is conceivable that the compareAndSet() may fail many times before succeeding and it may be worth gathering statistics on that if concerns you.

I'm not suggesting that this is a better or worse approach than a simple synchronized block as others have suggested, but I personally would probably use a synchronized block for simplicity.

EDIT: I'll answer your actual question "Why doesn't mine work?"

Your code has:

    int next = counter.incrementAndGet();
    if (next > Byte.MAX_VALUE) {

As these two lines are not protected by a synchronized block, multiple threads can execute them concurrently and all obtain values of next > Byte.MAX_VALUE. All of them will then drop through into the synchronized block and set counter back to INITIAL_VALUE (one after another as they wait for each other).

Over the years, there has been a huge amount written over the pitfalls of trying to get a performance tweak by not synchronizing when it doesn't seem necessary. For example, see Double Checked Locking

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Yes it is wrong, but I also think your explanation is not correct. The second thread won't reset again back the counter because there is a int i = counter.get(); in the synchronized block. –  Petar Minchev Sep 12 '11 at 10:37
    
While this looks like double checked locking, it should not suffer from the same problems, as AtomicInteger should guarantee that all the threads see the same counter value (no caching). Or is there something more going on? –  Neeme Praks Sep 12 '11 at 10:47
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