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Basically I'm trying to do this in LINQ to SQL;

SELECT DISTINCT a,b,c FROM table WHERE z=35

I have tried this, (c# code)

(from record in db.table
select new table {
    a = record.a,
    b = record.b,
    c = record.c
}).Where(record => record.z.Equals(35)).Distinct();

But when I remove column z from the table object in that fashion I get the following exception;

Binding error: Member 'table.z' not found in projection.

I can't return field z because it will render my distinct useless. Any help is appreciated, thanks.

Edit:

This is a more comprehensive example that includes the use of PredicateBuilder,

var clause = PredicateBuilder.False<User>();
clause = clause.Or(user => user.z.Equals(35));
foreach (int i in IntegerList) {
    int tmp = i;
    clause = clause.Or(user => user.a.Equals(tmp));
}

var results = (from u in db.Users
               select new User {
                   a = user.a,
                   b = user.b,
                   c = user.c
               }).Where(clause).Distinct();

Edit2:

Many thanks to everyone for the comments and answers, this is the solution I ended up with,

var clause = PredicateBuilder.False<User>();
clause = clause.Or(user => user.z.Equals(35));
foreach (int i in IntegerList) {
    int tmp = i;
    clause = clause.Or(user => user.a.Equals(tmp));
}

var results = (from u in db.Users
               select u)
               .Where(clause)
               .Select(u => new User {
                   a = user.a,
                   b = user.b,
                   c = user.c
               }).Distinct();

The ordering of the Where followed by the Select is vital.

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1  
May I humbly suggest that you rename your data types and properties a bit? The fact that you create a new record by writing new table { … } seems quite confusing and non-intuitive, especially because there appears to be a property db.table that is a collection of table-like objects... –  stakx Sep 12 '11 at 9:49
    
I was just trying to change references to be more generic for the example. Can those that downvoted please provide an explanation so that I don't make the same question-asking mistake in future. –  Red Taz Sep 12 '11 at 9:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

problem is there because you where clause is outside linq query and you are applying the where clause on the new anonymous datatype thats y it causing error

Suggest you to change you query like

(from record in db.table
where record.z == 35
select new table {
    a = record.a,
    b = record.b,
    c = record.c
}).Distinct();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the subtle gag! –  Preet Sangha Sep 12 '11 at 9:47
    
I see. Is it possible to do this using PredicateBuilder? I am building up a chain of clauses that is only known at runtime. –  Red Taz Sep 12 '11 at 10:05
    
@Rob2211 - well you can check the post by me : pranayamr.blogspot.com/2011/04/dynamic-query-with-linq.html might help you –  Pranay Rana Sep 12 '11 at 10:21
    
Thanks, I'm accepting this as the answer since it explains the problem with the originally posted code. –  Red Taz Sep 12 '11 at 11:12

Can't you just put the WHERE clause in the LINQ?

(from record in db.table
where record.z == 35
select new table {
    a = record.a,
    b = record.b,
    c = record.c
}).Distinct();

Alternatively, if you absolutely had to have it the way you wrote it, use .Select

.Select(r => new { a = r.a, b=r.b, c=r.c }).Distinct();

As shown here LINQ Select Distinct with Anonymous Types, this method will work since it compares all public properties of anonymous types.

Hopefully this helps, unfortunately I have not much experience with LINQ so my answer is limited in expertise.

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Thanks Daryl, this answer helped me with my eventual solution. I didn't realise I could do (from foo in bar select a).Where().Select() –  Red Taz Sep 12 '11 at 11:14

SELECT DISTINCT a,b,c FROM table WHERE z=35

An important thing to note about SQL is that while the WHERE … clause appears after the SELECT … clause, it would logically have to be carried out before the SELECT: That is, first you filter out unwanted records (by specifying a condition in the WHERE clause), then you project (SELECT) the remaining records by selecting particular attributes from it.

(In a similar fashion, the DISTINCT cannot actually be carried out until the very end, when all result records are available; yet it stands at the beginning of the query.)


Now let's look at your LINQ query (which I've abbreviated and reformatted a tiny bit):

(from … in … select …).Where(…).Distinct();

From the above explanation, you can now easily see that you translated your SQL query to C# too literally and thus got the ordering of Select and Where wrong. Try to turn it around, and things might work out better:

(from record in db.table
 where record.z == 35
 select new table { a = record.a, b = record.b, c = record.c })
.Distinct();

This (more so than the corresponding SQL query) accurately reflects the order in which the single operators Where, Select and Distinct will actually be carried out.

P.S.: The last bit of my answer assumes that db.table is not a collection of your table type. From what you've asked, it appears that table does not have a z property, while the type underlying the db.table collection does.

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