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First, I'm not sure I really understand what a selector is. From my understanding, it's the name of a method, and you can assign it to a class of type 'SEL' and then run methods such as respondToSelector to see if the receiver implements that method. Can someone offer up a better explanation?

Secondly, to this point, I have the following code:

NSString *thing = @"Hello, this is Craig";

SEL sel = @selector(lowercaseString:);
NSString *lower = (([thing respondsToSelector:sel]) ? @"YES" : @"NO");
NSLog (@"Responds to lowercaseString: %@", lower);
if ([thing respondsToSelector:sel]) //(lower == @"YES")
    NSLog(@"lowercaseString is: %@", [thing lowercaseString]);

However, even though thing is clearly a kind of NSString, and should respond to lowercaseString, I cannot get the 'respondsToSelector' conditional to return "YES"...

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7  
Stanford course CS193P assignment 1B? I have exactly the same question here! :) –  Corstian Boerman May 5 '13 at 16:14

8 Answers 8

up vote 144 down vote accepted

You have to be very careful about the method names. In this case, the method name is just "lowercaseString", not "lowercaseString:" (note the absence of the colon). That's why you're getting NO returned, because NSString objects respond to the lowercaseString message but not the lowercaseString: message.

How do you know when to add a colon? You add a colon to the message name if you would add a colon when calling it, which happens if it takes one argument. If it takes zero arguments (as is the case with lowercaseString), then there is no colon. If it takes more than one argument, you have to add the extra argument names along with their colons, as in compare:options:range:locale:.

You can also look at the documentation and note the presence or absence of a trailing colon.

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Thanks a lot, man! If you'll fail to do that you might get an exception at runtime saying "unrecognized selector sent to instance" when using notifications with selectors. –  Soonts Jul 29 '11 at 22:59
    
Thanks for this informative answer. Helped me out. –  Nathan Garabedian Sep 15 '12 at 3:38
1  
This is your annual "Thanks! You saved me a huge amount of time today!" comment. –  Russell Borogove Sep 12 '13 at 23:27

You want to read Selector description on Apple developer site: Selectors.

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That's because you want @selector(lowercaseString), not @selector(lowercaseString:). There's a subtle difference: the second one implies a parameter (note the colon at the end), but - [NSString lowercaseString] does not take a parameter.

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In this case, the name of the selector is wrong. The colon here is part of the method signature; it means that the method takes one argument. I believe that you want

SEL sel = @selector(lowercaseString);
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Selectors are an efficient way to reference methods directly in compiled code - the compiler is what actually assigns the value to a SEL.

Other have already covered the second part of your q, the ':' at the end matches a different signature than what you're looking for (in this case that signature doesn't exist).

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NSString's method is lowercaseString (0 arguments), not lowercaseString: (1 argument).

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Don't think of the colon as part of the function name, think of it as a separator, if you don't have anything to separate (no value to go with the function) then you don't need it.

I'm not sure why but all this OO stuff seems to be foreign to Apple developers. I would strongly suggest grabbing Visual Studio Express and playing around with that too. Not because one is better than the other, just it's a good way to look at the design issues and ways of thinking.

Like

introspection = reflection
+ before functions/properties = static
- = instance level

It's always good to look at a problem in different ways and programming is the ultimate puzzle.

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From my understanding of the Apple documentation, a selector represents the name of the method that you want to call. The nice thing about selectors is you can use them in cases where the exact method to be called varies. As a simple example, you can do something like:

SEL selec;
if (a == b) {
selec = @selector(method1)
}
else
{
selec = @selector(method2)
};
[self performSelector:selec];
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