Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am creating a game called Simon Says in C++ and want to be able to hit the space bar and display 5 random images that i have already loaded to my game. And every time i hit the space bar i want the images to be in a different order than the previous time therefore i need to be able to have a command to randomly display the 5 different images once i hit the space bar. Here is the code i have to display the images in a set order:

     if(key_down(VK_SPACE))
    {
        clear_screen();
        a();
        refresh_screen();
        delay(1000);
        clear_screen();
        b();
        refresh_screen();
        delay(1000);
        clear_screen();
        e();
        refresh_screen();
        delay(1000);
        clear_screen();
        d();
        refresh_screen();
        delay(1000);
        clear_screen();
        g();
        refresh_screen();
        delay(1000);
        clear_screen();
        c();
        refresh_screen();
        delay(1000);
        clear_screen();
        refresh_screen();

    }
share|improve this question
6  
And what's the problem, exactly? –  In silico Sep 12 '11 at 12:27
    

4 Answers 4

Here is plumbing (without the (SDL) library specifics):


Edit using random_shuffle is a lot better:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

void a() { std::cout<<"a"<<std::endl; }
void b() { std::cout<<"b"<<std::endl; }
void c() { std::cout<<"c"<<std::endl; }
void d() { std::cout<<"d"<<std::endl; }
void e() { std::cout<<"e"<<std::endl; }

int main()
{
    typedef void(*flashfunc)();
    static flashfunc flashes[] = {a,b,c,d,e};

    std::random_shuffle(flashes, flashes+5);

    for (flashfunc *flash=flashes; flash!=flashes+5; ++flash)
        (*flash)();

    return 0;   
}

I had initially forgotten about random_shuffel and came up with this way of doing a make-shift shuffle:

#include <ctime>

template <typename T>
    bool shuffled(const T&, const T&)
{
int r = rand() / ( RAND_MAX / 2 );
return 0 != r;
}

// ...  
    srand(time(NULL));
    std::stable_sort(flashes, flashes+5, shuffled<flashfunc>);

Note that using this way to sort, you need stable sort because the sort predicate is not deterministic.

share|improve this answer

The standard algorithm std::random_shuffle will put an array (or vector, etc) into random order.

It appears from your code that you have a different function to draw each image, so in that case the things you shuffle should probably be function pointers. Then, loop (either directly or via std::for_each) over your shuffled array (or vector, etc) calling each in turn and doing the clear/refresh/delay.

share|improve this answer
    
good point. is random_shuffle 'new' or something - I haven't seen it before –  sehe Sep 12 '11 at 13:02
    
No. It's been in every C++ version since '98. You need #include <algorithm> –  MSalters Sep 12 '11 at 13:17
    
@sehe: It isn't. Many algorithms are in <algorithm> –  phresnel Sep 12 '11 at 13:24
    
@phresnel: LOL, I kind-a knew 'many algorithms' are in there :) Many are in <numeric> (accumulate, anyone?) by the way. Somehow I just forgot about it/missed it. Hey, I can forget things too, yay! –  sehe Sep 12 '11 at 13:26
    
@sehe: I do not even try to memorize them. I think a rough grasp is enough; know where to look it up. With other languages (and with C++0x) it is near to impossible to remember them all, anyways :) –  phresnel Sep 12 '11 at 13:53

You can a function like the following:

//returns random number between 0 and 4, inclusive
int getRandomInt() {
    return rand() % 5;
}

However, you must first call srand(someNumber) before using it for the first time. The system time is a good candidate for someNumber to ensure that the same number is not used every time you run the program.

share|improve this answer
    
Prefer: return rand() / ( RAND_MAX / 6 ) (see my answer and comment) –  sehe Sep 12 '11 at 13:25

srand (http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/srand/) and rand (http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/rand/) could help you to generate random numbers. I would store all images in an array and draw random indices. But don't draw any index twice. Since generating random numbers is a cheap operation in comparison to displaying images, you could repeat the procedure until you find a valid index. WaelJ*s answer will help you to generate numbers within the arrays boundaries.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.