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public class LeapYear { 
    public static void main(String[] args) { 
        int year = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
        boolean isLeapYear;

        // divisible by 4
        isLeapYear = (year % 4 == 0);

        // divisible by 4 and not 100
        isLeapYear = isLeapYear && (year % 100 != 0);

        // divisible by 4 and not 100 unless divisible by 400
        isLeapYear = isLeapYear || (year % 400 == 0);

        System.out.println(isLeapYear);
    }
}

I am passing 1900 as my input. The first condition evaluates to true as its divisible by 4, but again 1900 should be divisible by 100 too...

How come i am getting 1900 as not a leap year.... what is the value being passed in the second && condition... (year % 100 !=0)

Update

public class TestSample {
    public static void main(String[] args){

        int leapYear = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
        boolean isLeapYear;

        isLeapYear = (leapYear % 4 == 0) && (leapYear % 100 != 0);

        System.out.println("Its Leap Year" +isLeapYear);

    }

}

Compiling this program prints 1900 not a leapYear How???? Here i am not even checking for the whether its divisible by 400 or not.

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1900 is divisible by 4, by 100 but not by 400, so it meets your requirements of NOT being a leap year –  maasg Sep 12 '11 at 12:47
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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

To explain your code:

isLeapYear = (year % 4 == 0);
// isLeapYear = true

isLeapYear = isLeapYear && (year % 100 != 0);
// year % 100 IS 0. so the second part evaluates to false giving
// true && false which yields isLeapYear as false

isLeapYear = isLeapYear || (year % 400 == 0);
// this is just false || false
// which evaluates to false

Another suggestion I have for you is to just use the GregorianCalendar to find what you want:

GregorianCalendar cal = new GregorianCalendar();
System.out.println( cal.isLeapYear(1900) );    
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+1 for recommending the more suitable approach, although I assume the OP may expected to implement this themselves given the 'homework' tag :) –  obfuscation Sep 12 '11 at 12:52
1  
If that's the case, he should just rip out the relevant part from GregorianCalendar. ie. return (year%100 != 0) || (year%400 == 0) :) –  Mike Kwan Sep 12 '11 at 13:01
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1900 is not a leap year. 1600 is a leap year, 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, then 2000 is again a leap year, etc. So your code is correct. That's good news, right?

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You're aware that 1900 was not a leap year, right? So the answer is correct.

    // divisible by 4 and not 100
    isLeapYear = isLeapYear && (year % 100 != 0);

This does exactly what is written in the comment. 1900 is divisible by 4 and 100, so it doesn't match the above condition. By contrast 1904 is divisible by 4 and not by 100, so it matches.

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The first question is already explained, right!

So the update:

isLeapYear = (leapYear % 4 == 0) && (leapYear % 100 != 0);

means

isLeapYear = (1900 / 4 leaves 0 as remainder, and 0 ==0 is true)
               AND
             ( 1900 / 100 leaves 0 as remainder, so 0 != 0 is FALSE);
isLeapYear = true AND false   ==> false

and the answer is ... false. That's what you've got.

And 1900 wasn't a leap year, anyway.

Check at any site, like http://www.onlineconversion.com/leapyear.htm or http://www.dataip.co.uk/Reference/LeapYear.php

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