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How could I improve the performance of my below JQuery code:

var firstRowCellsWidth = new Array();

function initialize();

    $('table.rgMasterTable > tbody > tr:first > td').each(function () {

            firstRowCellsWidth.push({
                normalCellWidth: $(this).width(),
                firstTemplateCellWidth: $(this).find('table > tbody > tr > td:first').width()
            });
        });
}

I'm using :first, $(this), .find(, >, and each(). these apparently degrade the performance?

What should they be replaced with? or what are their equivalent native javascript code?

I'd guess using for loop instead of the each() method. what about the rest?

Purpose of the code: To figure out the width of each column of the table. the master table has also a nested table as can be seen.

Thanks,

share|improve this question
1  
You have nested tables? – Šime Vidas Sep 12 '11 at 13:52
    
What are you trying to do? Rather than asking people to improve code you think is poor ask them to give you a solution to your problem (although you should include what you've already tried) – Patrick Sep 12 '11 at 13:53
    
@Sime Vidas: yes – The Light Sep 12 '11 at 14:01
    
@Patrick. I think his question is pretty clear. He's asking about some very specific jQuery features, and how they could potentially be replaced with more efficient code. – maxedison Sep 12 '11 at 14:04
1  
@William (1) Are nested tables really neccessary? (2) How many .rgMasterTable tables are there? Only one? Multiple? – Šime Vidas Sep 12 '11 at 14:35
var firstRowCellsWidth = [];
function initialize(){
  var tables = document.getElementsByTagName("table");
  for(var i=0; i<tables.length; i++){
    if(/(^|\s)rgMasterTable(\s|$)/.test(tables[i].className)){
      //a className is only valid if the className is contained within a space/nothing(^) and a space/nothing($)

      var tcell = tables[i].rows[0].cells; //Any cell
      for(var j=0; j<tcell.length; j++){
        firstRowCellsWidth.push({
          normalCellWidth:tcell[j].offsetWidth,
          firstTemplateCellWidth:tcell[j].getElementsByTagName("td")[0].offsetWidth
         //the first cell of any row of any table = the first occurence of a TD element
        });
      }
      //break;
      //Uncomment the previous line if you want to enumerate through all tables whose class equals .rgMasterTable
    }
  }
}

As efficient as possible, without use of JQuery (frameworks are used too often by lazy scripters who do not mind a loss in computing efficiency).

Note that an error will be thrown when the document structure does not match your description (tcell[j].getElementsByTagName("td"[0] is undefined).

EDIT: JavaScript vs JQUery in terms of speed

As a response to maxedison (third comment), who questioned my statement that JQuery is less efficient than JavaScript. Copy the code snippets belows and paste them in the location bar (of this page). A prompt will appear, where the number of tests can be specified. After the test has run, an alert pops up, showing the needed amount of milliseconds to perform these tests. Two test cases are provided:

Native JavaScript test case:

javascript:alert((function(m){
for(var i=0, t=new Date; i<m; i++){
  document.getElementsByTagName("table")[0].rows[0].cells[0];
}
return (new Date).getTime()-t.getTime();
})(prompt("Native\x20JS,\x20repeat\x20n\x20times:","10000")));

JQuery test case. Warning: Do not start with a large number of tests:

javascript:alert((function(m){
for(var i=0, t=new Date; i<m; i++){
  $("table > tbody > tr > td:first");
}
return (new Date).getTime()-t.getTime();
})(prompt("JQuery,\20repeat\x20n\x20times","10")));

At my 1 year old laptop, using FireFox 3.6.22, 10000 calls using native JavaScript equals 5 JQuery executions.

share|improve this answer
    
you suggest rewriting everything in plain DOM JavaScript?! – The Light Sep 12 '11 at 14:45
    
I have updated my answer to make it more clear: Replace your initialize function by my proposal. You're missing a curly bracelet ({) after function initialize(), by the way. – Rob W Sep 12 '11 at 14:54
    
"frameworks are used too often by lazy scripters who do not mind a loss in computing efficiency" -- JS engines in browsers are so fast these days that "efficiency" is rarely an issue. Efficiency only matters if it causes problems in the real world. Until it does, ease of coding & code maintenance are the priorities. In the OP's case, we've obviously arrived at a point when efficiency needs to be dealt with. But I've written tons of jQuery code and never had reason to worry about efficiency. Anyway, I'll be interested to hear what improvements the OP experiences with your code. – maxedison Sep 13 '11 at 17:33
    
@maxedison See my updated answer. My explanation of JS vs JQuery was more suitable at the answer (see EDIT). – Rob W Sep 14 '11 at 12:31
    
I never "questioned your statement that jQuery is less efficient than JavaScript." Of course it is. I was simply saying that more often than not, the "loss in computing efficiency" is negligible, and therefore ease of coding & code maintenance are the priorities. I like the edit though :) – maxedison Sep 14 '11 at 19:33

Are you actually experiencing performance problems? It doesn't look like this is the kind of loop that is getting run so many times that saving a couple ms per iteration would make any noticeable difference.

Anyway, I realize you may be asking out of curiosity, so here is one way that performance could be improved:

  • before pushing the values, store $(this) in a variable. Remember that $ is actually a function, so $(this) means that you are calling the function $ and passing the argument this to it. As a general rule of thumb, if your'e going to need to use $(this) more than once, storing it in a variable will be faster since it avoids making additional $ function calls.

I'd also be curious to know whether a standard for loop would ever be significantly faster than .each(). However, when you ask "what are their equivalent native javascript code?", be aware that the entire reason you're using jQuery is because it's a lot easier to write & read, and that most "native javascript" equivalents are going to look & be far more complicated. So that question itself kind of defeats the purpose of using jQuery in the first place, unless of course you really are experiencing some performance issues.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the tip on $(this). the problem I'm currently having is that I'm looping through 4-6 hierarchical nested tables using JQuery and the above functions are used in many places but IE freezes for a long time when there are over 100 rows in a table so I thought maybe these codes are degrading its performance. – The Light Sep 12 '11 at 14:10
    
Did you try Rob W's solution? Curious to know how much that improves things. – maxedison Sep 13 '11 at 17:49

One improvement would be to store a reference to any jQuery object you intent to use more than once..

So instead of using multiple times $(this) use

var $this = $(this);

and use $this from now on to refer to that object..

function initialize(){
    $('table.rgMasterTable > tbody > tr:first > td').each(function () {
            var $this = $(this);
            firstRowCellsWidth.push({
                normalCellWidth: $this.width(),
                firstTemplateCellWidth: $this.find('table > tbody > tr > td:first').width()
            });
        });
}
share|improve this answer

Replacing the .each with a native loop likely won't do anything, the .each is just doing a for loop anyway.

Are you actually having problems with speed?

Assuming that you're going to have static layouts for your tables you could figure out how to navigate down using .childNodes[]. You would do something like

document.getElementById('myTable').childNodes[0].childNodes[0].childNodes[0]

. As you can imagine, that gets pretty ugly pretty fast.

You could probably speed up your selectors a little bit by getting rid of the > trbody > part, unless you have a table in your trbody and another in a trhead it's not doing anything.

share|improve this answer
    
> is important; it gets the first direct element and that's what is needed. this suggests that for loop has a higher performance than .each() but haven't verified it myself: jquery-howto.blogspot.com/2009/06/… – The Light Sep 12 '11 at 14:15
    
...but since you're filtering to the table in the :first tr inside of the main table anyway, does it still matter? You haven't posted any of your HTML so it's hard for me to say for sure but I'm just guessing it probably doesn't. – evan Sep 12 '11 at 14:20
    
as far as .each being faster than for, the blog you posted concludes by saying it DOESN'T matter. He sees a difference of 3ms when running 10,000 iterations. How many iterations are you going to be doing? – evan Sep 12 '11 at 14:23
    
like I said > is necessary since e.g. there are other tbody elements in the html but only the first closest to the root should be selected. – The Light Sep 12 '11 at 14:42
    
ok but you don't need > just to find a child, if you say $(this).find('tr:first') it will give you the first tr inside of this - not the first tr on the page. – evan Sep 12 '11 at 15:03

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