Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a -

Table X  
------------------------------------
TaskId (bigint-identity-primary key)  
Data1 (varchar), Data2(varchar)

Now, I am creating a new Table -

Table Y 
------------------------------------
Id (identity, Primary Key)
TaskId(FK to Table X)
Data3(varchar)

Now, since Table X and Table Y will have a one-one relationship based on the TaskId column, so what and how should do I define the Primary Key, Index, etc on Table Y ?

Also, is it worth having an identity column at all as Primary Key if it will never be used in where clause ? I have just added it by convention.

share|improve this question
    
Lets call TableX table Task and TableY table Y. Is every Y a Task? Or is every Task a Y? Or both? –  ypercube Sep 12 '11 at 14:07
    
every Y is a Task –  Angshuman Agarwal Sep 12 '11 at 14:09
1  
If every Y is a Task and every Task is related to one Y only (as the 1:1 implies) and not to many (as the FK definition implies), then use Y.TaskId as both the Primary Key and a Foreign Keyto Tasks. –  ypercube Sep 12 '11 at 14:09
    
I should have said: "and every Task is related to zero or one Y" –  ypercube Sep 12 '11 at 14:16

4 Answers 4

Since this is 1:1 relationship, and every Y is a Task you can use this approach:

Table Y 
----------
TaskId (bigint),
Data3 (varchar),
PRIMARY KEY TaskId, 
FOREIGN KEY TaskId REFERENCES Task(TaskId)

I guess this is useful if only a few Tasks are Y-Tasks and not all of them. And you prefer not to have NULLs in your tables.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the good answer. –  Adrian Iftode Sep 12 '11 at 14:16
    
Actually, all Y data will refer Tasks data. It is strict 1:1. I am not a DB expert. The Table X previously did not have that column. So, as you all believe, I went ahead and added my new column in Table X, but I saw that performance degraded by 10% while doing a select query on Table X after adding this column. And, this new column is just a read-only column. hence, I am trying to make a new table such that Table X remains as is. –  Angshuman Agarwal Sep 12 '11 at 14:28

If it's a one-one relationship, why create a whole new table Y? Just add the new Data3 column to Table X.

share|improve this answer
    
That was the design, but due to performance issues, it is being separated. –  Angshuman Agarwal Sep 12 '11 at 14:07
    
+1 - very good point. Hoping he just wrote it wrong... –  JNK Sep 12 '11 at 14:07
1  
Performance could improve if you apply Vertical Partitioning but if that's the case, the design structure of Y should be kept the same as that of X and the question is moot. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Sep 12 '11 at 14:13
    
@JNK - I am not a DB expert. The Table X previously did not have that column. So, as you all believe, I went ahead and added my new column in Table X, but I saw that performance degraded by 10% while doing a select query on Table X after adding this column. And, this new column is just a read-only column. hence, I am trying to make a new table such that Table X remains as is. –  Angshuman Agarwal Sep 12 '11 at 14:19
    
If it's a strict 1:1 (and not 0..1:1 as I thought), splitting the table like this is Vertical Partinioning as @Lieven mentioned. See his link for pros and cons of the approach. It's possible you could gain performance in some situations. It's also possible you might have your original approach, with one table, without problems. Perhaps the addition of the column caused fragmentation of the table in disk? No idea about that. Someone with expertise on SQL-Server may advice. –  ypercube Sep 12 '11 at 14:40

Assuming you actually have a 1:Many relationship...

Keep your PK and Clustered index key on the ID field.

Create a non-clustered index on TaskID, Data3 or, if you never filter on Data3 and only SELECT it, just INCLUDE (Data3).

share|improve this answer
    
Its not 1:Many .. Its 1-1 –  Angshuman Agarwal Sep 12 '11 at 14:09
    
I have answered to your query already –  Angshuman Agarwal Sep 12 '11 at 14:30

If you must separate it and you are sure that it will always remain 1-1, then use taskID as the PK. If it could be 1-many inteh future, add an identity and put a unique index on taskid. Then if you go 1-many all you have to do is drop the unique index.

share|improve this answer
    
But won't the inserts be slow for 5 million + kind of record size if I make TaskId as the PK ? –  Angshuman Agarwal Sep 12 '11 at 21:17
1  
I can't see why they would be any slower than if you had an identity field. You still need the FK to the first table. SO it has to check that anyway. You still need it to be unique so it is either check it as the PK or check it using the unique index. But you don't have to generate the ids. –  HLGEM Sep 12 '11 at 21:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.