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here is the function which is working fine, but giving the output in an output which I don't want.

frequencies <- {}

for (k in (1:4))
{   
    interval <- (t(max_period_set[k]))

    intervals <- round(quantile(interval,c(0,0.05,0.15,0.25,0.35,0.45,0.55,0.65,0.75,0.85,0.95,1.0)))
    frequency <- {}
    for (i in (2:length(intervals)))
    {       
        count = 0;      
        for (r in (1:length(interval)))
        {
            if (r == length(interval))
            {
                if (interval[r] >= intervals[i-1] && interval[r] <= intervals[i])
                {
                    count = count + 1
                }
            }
            else
            { 
                if (interval[r] >= intervals[i-1] && interval[r] < intervals[i])
                {
                    count = count + 1
                }
            }
        }   
        frequency <- c(frequency,count)
    }
    frequencies[[length(frequencies)+1]] <- frequency
}

The output is as follows:

> frequencies
[[1]]
 [1] 2 6 5 4 5 4 6 5 5 5 3

[[2]]
 [1] 1 7 5 4 5 4 5 6 5 5 3

[[3]]
 [1] 3 5 5 4 5 4 6 5 5 5 3

[[4]]
 [1] 3 5 5 4 4 6 5 5 5 5 3

I would like to have it in a format as follows:

[[],[],[],[]] which is a list of list whose first element I can access like frequencies[1] to get the first list, etc...

If it is not possible, how can I access the first list values in my current format? frequencies[1] does not give me the first list values back.

Thanks for your help!

Guys an another question:

now I can access the data but r is representing the last line in different format:

[[1]]
 [1] 1.00 0.96 0.84 0.74 0.66 0.56 0.48 0.36 0.26 0.16 0.06 0.00

[[2]]
 [1] 1.00 0.98 0.84 0.74 0.66 0.56 0.48 0.38 0.26 0.16 0.06 0.00

[[3]]
 [1] 1.00 0.94 0.84 0.74 0.66 0.56 0.48 0.36 0.26 0.16 0.06 0.00

[[4]]
 [1] 1.000000e+00 9.400000e-01 8.400000e-01 7.400000e-01 6.600000e-01 5.800000e-01 4.600000e-01 3.600000e-01 2.600000e-01 1.600000e-01 6.000000e-02 1.110223e-16

Why is it happening with the accuracy? the first three lines are as it should be but the last line is odd, the numbers were not infractional numbers, so it can be represented as a number with its accuracy of 2 after comma digits.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

frequencies is a list, so you need

 frequencies[[1]]

to access the first element. If list were named, you could also index by element name.

Lists are the most general data structure, and the only one that can

  • be nested: lists within lists within ...
  • be ragged: does not require rectangular dimensions

so you should try to overcome initial aversion to the fact that it is different. These are very powerful data structures, and are use a lot behind the scenes.

Edit: Also, a number of base functions as well as add-on packages can post-process lists. It starts with something basic like do.call(), goes to lapply and ends all the over at the plyr packages. Keep reading -- there are many ways to skin the same cat, some better than others.

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Thanks am now able to access it. –  Bob Sep 12 '11 at 14:52
    
Can you please have a look on my updated questions? –  Bob Sep 12 '11 at 16:03
    
In element four, the last number is effectively zero. The others are just shown in scientific notation. You could use round(), or prettynum(), or ... to deal with this. Also see the R FAQ about 'why are these two numbers not equal'. Floating point is tricky on computers, and that is not an R issue. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Sep 12 '11 at 16:06
    
I just want to have the fourth line as the first three ones. Why is there a different accuracy? How can I make it like the first three ones? –  Bob Sep 12 '11 at 16:12
    
I tried prettynum(), but the last zero is shown same: > prettyNum(frequencies[[4]]) [1] "1" "0.94" "0.84" "0.74" "0.66" "0.58" "0.46" "0.36" "0.26" "0.16" "0.06" [12] "1.110223e-16" –  Bob Sep 12 '11 at 16:14
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While I completely agree with Dirk on the usefulness of lists, you can, if all of your lists are the same length, convert them to a dataframe using as.data.frame() and then you can index them by column i frequencies[,i] or by row j frequencies[j,]

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Can you please have a look on my updated quesiton? –  Bob Sep 12 '11 at 16:03
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