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I have got an array that contains data in hierarchical form such as:

Level 2
  chapter 1
  chapter 2
Level 4
  chapter 1
  chapter 2
Level 1
  chapter 1
  chapter 2
Level 3
  chapter 1
  chapter 2

If I just call array.sort(), the hierarchy gets disturbed. So, I have to develop my own way of sorting items. The thing I can't understand is, how would I compare two levels such that I would know that level 1 is less than level 2 and it should be at the top index of the array?

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2  
I have no idea what your array looks like... –  Šime Vidas Sep 12 '11 at 14:41
    
How does this array get formed? Is it really an Array or just an Object –  meouw Sep 12 '11 at 14:41
1  
is your array flat? like ['level2', 'chapter1', 'chater2', 'level4'] etc –  Pablo Fernandez Sep 12 '11 at 14:41
    
Does this mean arrays in arrays? –  pimvdb Sep 12 '11 at 14:41
    
No this is an array that contains these strings. array[0]=level 2, array[1]=chapter 1, array[3]=level 4 and so on...so its a flat array!! –  samach321 Sep 12 '11 at 14:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You really shouldn't be using a flat array. You lose all the hierarchical information. Something like this would be better:

//I've deliberately made these unsorted to show you that sorting works
levels = ["Level 4", "Level 3", "Level 1", "Level 2"];

data = {
  "Level 3" : ["chapter 1", "chapter 2"],
  "Level 1" : ["chapter 2", "chapter 1"],
  "Level 2" : ["chapter 2", "chapter 1"],
  "Level 4" : ["chapter 1", "chapter 2"]  
};

levels.sort();
for(var i = 0 i < levels.length; i++) {
    console.log(levels[i]);
    var chapters = data[levels[i]];

    chapters.sort();    
    for(var j = 0; j < chapters.length; j++) {
        console.log(chapters[j]);
    }
}

EDIT

Rob suggested using levels.sort(function(x,y){return x.localeCompare(y)}) instead of the regular .sort(). The former will sort ["abc", "Abcd", "Ab"] to ["Ab", "abc", "Abcd"] instead of ["Ab", "Abcd", "abc"].

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Your extra comma in the data array will make IE barf. –  Jens Roland Sep 12 '11 at 15:00
    
Another note: Use levels.sort(function(x,y){return x.localeCompare(y)}) instead of a plain .sort(). The normal sort function would sort ["abc", "Abcd", "Ab"] to ["Ab", "Abcd", "abc"]. My proposal would result ["Ab", "abc", "Abcd"]. –  Rob W Sep 12 '11 at 15:01
    
@Jens That was a copy-pasta syntax error. Rob Thanks! I will edit my answer. –  Vivin Paliath Sep 12 '11 at 15:19

This should reformat the flat PHP array to the nicer JS object:

var fromPHP = ['Level 2','chapter 1','chapter 2','Level 4','chapter 1','chapter 2','Level 1','chapter 1','chapter 2','Level 3','chapter 1','chapter 2'];

var levels = [],
    betterArray = [fromPHP[0]],
    currentLevel=betterArray[0];

for (var i=1;i<fromPHP.length;i++) {
  if (fromPHP[i].substr(0,5) == 'Level') {
    currentLevel = [];
    levels.push(fromPHP[i]);
    betterArray[fromPHP[i]] = currentLevel;
  } else {
    currentLevel.push(fromPHP[i]);
  }
}

Should give the following levels and betterArray:

// levels:
['Level 4','Level 3','Level 1','Level 2']

// betterArray:
{
    'Level 2': ['chapter 1','chapter 2'],
    'Level 4': ['chapter 1','chapter 2'],
    'Level 1': ['chapter 1','chapter 2'],
    'Level 3': ['chapter 1','chapter 2']
}

Now you can run whatever sorting you want on the subarrays and get what you wanted.

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