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I am passing a pointer to function and I want to initialze the array of structures in called function and want to use that array main function. But I was unable to get it in main function. Here is my code:

typedef struct _testStruct
{
    int a;
    int b;
} testStruct;

void allocate(testStruct** t)
{
    int nCount = 0;
    int i = 0;
    printf("allocate 1\n");
    t = (testStruct**)malloc(10 * sizeof(testStruct));
    for(i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        t[i] = (testStruct *) malloc( 10 * sizeof(testStruct));
    }
    for(nCount = 0 ; nCount < 10; nCount++)
    {
        t[nCount]->a = nCount;
        t[nCount]->b = nCount + 1;

        printf( "A === %d\n", t[nCount]->a);
    }

}
int main()
{
    int nCount = 0;
    testStruct * test = NULL;
    int n = 0;
    allocate(&test);
    for(nCount = 0 ; nCount < 10; nCount++ )
    {
        if (test == NULL)
        {
            printf( "Not Allocated\n");
            exit(0);
        }
        //printf("a = %d\n",test[nCount]->a);
        /*printf("a = %d\n",test->a);
        printf("b = %d\n",test->b); */
    }

    return 0;
}

Please note I have to pass double pointer to function as it is required. Thank you for helping.

share|improve this question
    
Do you have a question? –  Carl Norum Sep 12 '11 at 17:38
    
This looks like a random rehash of several unrelated pieces of code. In the main function the array is obviously 1D. Yet the code inside allocate is obviously copied from some attempt to allocate a 2D array. So, what is it you are trying to allocate? A 1D array? Or a 2D array? You need to decide that first. –  AndreyT Sep 12 '11 at 17:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct _testStruct 
{ 
    int a; 
    int b; 
} testStruct; 

void allocate(testStruct** t) 
{ 
    int nCount = 0; 
    printf("allocate 1\n"); 
    testStruct *newT = (testStruct*)malloc(10 * sizeof(testStruct)); 
    for(nCount = 0 ; nCount < 10; nCount++) 
    { 
        newT[nCount].a = nCount; 
        newT[nCount].b = nCount + 1; 

        printf( "A === %d\n", newT[nCount].a); 
    }

    *t = newT;

} 
int main() 
{ 
    int nCount = 0; 
    testStruct * test = NULL; 
    allocate(&test); 
    for(nCount = 0 ; nCount < 10; nCount++ ) 
    { 
        printf("a = %d\n",test[nCount].a); 
        printf("a = %d\n",test[nCount].b); 

    } 

    return 0; 
}

Should work.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Carl, it is working :) –  user940959 Sep 12 '11 at 17:54
    
Thanks Ed Heal, U save my night :) –  user940959 Sep 12 '11 at 18:16
t = (testStruct**)malloc(10 * sizeof(testStruct));

is assigning to t, not test. Perhaps you want

*t = (testStruct*)malloc(10 * sizeof(testStruct));

instead? I'm not sure, I tend to get lost when so many pointers are around. Anyway, you don't seem to be assigning anything into the pointer you pass to your function.

share|improve this answer

You say you want to create an array of structures, but your allocate function creates a data structure more like two-dimensional array. In addition, you don't return that structure back to the caller in any way that makes sense. I think you have come confusion about pointers, malloc() and all of the indirection you're doing. Check out @Ed Heal's answer for a corrected program.

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