Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a homework problem for my C++ class and the problem wants us to have the user input a wavelength and then output the correct type of radiation. The point to notice is that there are more Wave Name values than there are Wave Lengths.

My solution is listed below:

const double WAVE_LENGTH[] = { 1e-11, 1e-8, 4e-7, 7e-7, 1e-3, 1e-2 };
const char* WAVE_NAME[] = { "Gamma Rays", "X Rays", "Ultraviolet", "Visible Light", "Infrared", "Microwaves", "Radio Waves" };

double waveLength;

std::cout << "Enter a wavelength in decimal or scientific notation\nWavelength: ";
std::cin >> waveLength;

for (unsigned short i = 0U; i < 6U; ++i)
{
    if (waveLength < WAVE_LENGTH[i])
    {
        std::cout << "The type of radiation is " << WAVE_NAME[i] << std::endl;
        break;
    }
    if (i == 5U) // Last iteration
        std::cout << "The type of radiation is " << WAVE_NAME[i + 1] << std::endl;
}

My question is regarding my approach at solving the problem, specifically within the loop. I can't seem to find a way to handle all the situations without creating two conditions inside the loop which seems like it is a poor design. I realize I could use a series of if/else if statements, but I figured a loop is cleaner. Is my approach the best way or is there a cleaner way of coding this?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Well, you have five bounded intervals and two unbounded ones. This will have to show in your loop one way or another. – Kerrek SB Sep 12 '11 at 16:42
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you can simplify your loop to this:

unsigned short i;

for (i = 0U; i < 6U; ++i)
{
    if (waveLength < WAVE_LENGTH[i])
    {
        break;
    }
}
std::cout << "The type of radiation is " << WAVE_NAME[i] << std::endl;
share|improve this answer
1  
This will always execute the outside std::cout. But his original code, might not. – Nawaz Sep 12 '11 at 16:35
    
Indeed - look at the original loop again - I think you'll find that my version gives identical behaviour. – Paul R Sep 12 '11 at 16:37
    
You're using i outside of the loop it's declared in. Did you intend to move it out of the loop? For the record, there's a couple decent solutions, but I like this one the best. It also means you have one less line to change when the output changes on you... – corsiKa Sep 12 '11 at 16:39
1  
@Paul. +1. Correct. :-) – Nawaz Sep 12 '11 at 16:39
1  
I like this.. I knew there was a cleaner way to do this. Thanks! (= – user898058 Sep 12 '11 at 16:45

In my view a somewhat cleaner design is to add positive infinity as the last element of WAVE_LENGTH. This way your corner case will require no special handling:

#include <iostream>
#include <limits>

...

const double WAVE_LENGTH[] = { 1e-11, 1e-8, 4e-7, 7e-7, 1e-3, 1e-2,
                               std::numeric_limits<double>::infinity() };
const char* WAVE_NAME[] = { "Gamma Rays", "X Rays", "Ultraviolet", "Visible Light",
                            "Infrared", "Microwaves", "Radio Waves" };

double waveLength;

std::cout << "Enter a wavelength in decimal or scientific notation\nWavelength: ";
std::cin >> waveLength;

for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(WAVE_LENGTH) / sizeof(WAVE_LENGTH[0]); ++i)
{
    if (waveLength < WAVE_LENGTH[i])
    {
        std::cout << "The type of radiation is " << WAVE_NAME[i] << std::endl;
        break;
    }
}

Also note how I've avoided having to hard-code the length of the array (6U in your code) in the loop's terminal condition.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a "cleaner" solution. – Paul R Sep 12 '11 at 16:42
    
The infinity idea is interesting.. Kind of makes sense since we are dealing with infinity in this situation as well. – user898058 Sep 12 '11 at 16:45
    
you even don't any condition as the loop always breaks on infinity. – mb14 Sep 12 '11 at 16:48

You can test the last iteration in the same if. Notice there is no test anymore itn for.

for (unsigned short i = 0U; ; ++i)
{
    if (i == 6 || waveLength < WAVE_LENGTH[i])
    {
        std::cout << "The type of radiation is " << WAVE_NAME[i] << std::endl;
        break;
    }

}

Alternatively, you can add a extra wavelength set to MAX_FLOAT (or whatever is called in C++) or set the last one to zero and exit if wave_length[i] == 0.0. That way you don't need to "know" the number of wave lengths.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.