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I'm lost and in need of some divine guidance.

First things first: assume you have some nicely-neat interfaces:

class IProduct
{
public:
    virtual void DoThings();
}


enum ProductType
{
   ...
}


class IProducer
{
public:
    virtual IProduct* Produce( ProductType type );
}


class IConsumer
{
public:
    virtual void Consume( IProduct* product );
}

Its plain simple yet: abstract factory, abstract consumer who will invoke interface, gladly provided by those freshly-spawned IProducts. But here comes the tricky part. Assume that there are two ( or more ) parallel concrete groups:

class ConcreteProducerA : public IProducer { ... }
class ConcreteConsumerA : public IConsumer { ... }
class ConcreteProductA : public IProduct { ... }

class ConcreteProducerB : public IProducer { ... }
class ConcreteConsumerB : public IConsumer { ... }
class ConcreteProductB : public IProduct { ... }

And those concretes are reeealy different things. Like a space-shuttle parts ( with a parts factory and a shuttle assembly line ) and bags of vegetables ( with a farm and .. idk, who whould consume those vegetables? ). Yet they have that thing in general: DoThings(). Pretend that it is, like, PackAndSend(), or Serialize(), or Dispose(), whatever you like. Nothing concrete, yet legit to base a hierarchy on. But those still have more differences, than generalities. So those ConcreteConsumers tend to use them differently. So differently, that, in fact, they absolutely MUST be sure, that it is supposed concrete type.

So here is the problem: I'm forcing the users of that hierarchy to downcast IPoduct to ConcreteProduct in their virtual overrides right now. And thats bugging me hard. I feel I'm missing something: a big flaw in hierarchy, some lack of pattern knowledge, something. I mean, I can make sure, that ConcreteConsumerB always recieves ConcreteProductB, but it's still a downcast. And would you ever use a framework, that always passes around (void*)'s and forces you to cast it to whenewer you think is gonna come at ya?

Solutions I've already considered:

  1. Tunnel all conctrete interfeces into IProduct. But that product gona turn into uncontrollable blob, who can Eat(), BeEaten(), Launch(), Destroy() and whoever knows what else. So this solution seems nothing better than downcasting to me.
  2. That DoThings() can probably be decoupled from IProduct into another handler, which will be able to accept all of the concretes (Visitor-like). That way IProduct can be removed and there will be separate concrete groups. But what if there is a SemiConcrete layer, which imlements some common functionality for those concrete groups? Like labeling, morphing, massaging, whatever. Plus when there will be need to add another concrete group I'll be forced to change that visitor(s), which kinda increases coupling.
  3. (ab)Use templates. That seems wise at the moment. Something along the lines of

    template < typename _IProduct >
    class IConcreteProducer : public IProducer
    {
    public:
        virtual _IProduct* Produce( _IProduct::Type type ) = 0;
        virtual _IProduct::Type DeduceType( ProductType type ) = 0;
        virtual IProduct* Produce( ProductType type )
        {
            return IConcreteProducer<typename _IProduct>::Produce( DeduceType( type ) );
        }
    }
    
    template < typename _IProduct >
    class IConcreteConsumer : public IConsumer
    {
    public:
        virtual void Consume( _IProduct* product ) = 0;
        virtual void Consume( IProduct* product )
        {
            IConcreteConsumer<typename _IProduct>::Consume( (_IProduct*)product );
        }
    }
    

    This way I'm in control of that downcast, but it is stil present.

Anyways, does this problem sound familiar to someone? Somebody seen it solved, or maybe heroicaly solved it himself? C++ solution would be awesome, but I think any staticaly-typed language will suffice.

share|improve this question
    
if they're "reeealy different things" is an inheritance hierarchy and factories galore really the right tool for the job? –  Flexo Sep 12 '11 at 17:24
    
This is clearly wrong : IConcreteConsumer<typename _IProduct> –  Nawaz Sep 12 '11 at 17:25
    
@awoodland well they different enough to require downcast, but have enough in common to be derived from some common base at least for sake of code reuse (apart from semantics). Is there another way to gracefuly reuse it apart from deriviation (yet preserving OOP-style)? –  Dark Sep 12 '11 at 17:32
    
Your IClass naming convention makes me really uncomfortable. You don't see it much in C++, but it is very common in java. It more than implies that it is an interface (pure virtual) in java. –  Tom Kerr Sep 12 '11 at 20:15
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yet they have that thing in general: DoThings(). Pretend that it is, like, PackAndSend(), or Serialize(), or Dispose(), whatever you like. Nothing concrete, yet legit to base a hierarchy on.

Just because they can be in some hierarchy, doesn't mean they should. They are unrelated. I can't even fathom what value you are adding to whatever code base by generalizing shuttles and vegetables. If it doesn't add benefit to the users, then you are likely just making things more convoluted on yourself.

I would expect to see interfaces like the below. Notice they don't inherit from anything. If you have shared code, write simpler dumb concrete classes that people can reuse by composition.

template<typename T>
  class Producer {
  public:
    virtual ~Producer() {}
    virtual std::auto_ptr<T> produce() = 0;
  };

template<typename T>
  class Consumer {
  public:
    virtual ~Consumer() {}
    virtual void consume(std::auto_ptr<T> val) = 0;
  };

Then I'd expect to see concrete functions to create these from various sources.

typedef Producer<Shuttle> ShuttleProducer;
typedef Consumer<Shuttle> ShuttleConsumer;

std::auto_ptr<ShuttleProducer> GetShuttleProducerFromFile(...);
std::auto_ptr<ShuttleProducer> GetShuttleProducerFromTheWeb(...);
std::auto_ptr<ShuttleProducer> GetDefaultShuttleProducer();

There probably isn't a pattern for what you want to do, it is likely two patterns that you are smooshing (technical term) together. You didn't betray why these things should be sharing a code base, so we can only guess.

In the more complicated scenarios, you'll want to strictly separate use from creation though. It is perfectly valid to have different interfaces that look sort of similar, but are used differently.

class Foo {
public:
  virtual ~Foo() {}
  virtual void doStuff() = 0;
  virtual void metamorphose() = 0;
};

class Fu {
public:
  virtual ~Fu() {}
  virtual void doStuff() = 0;
  virtual void transmorgrify() = 0;
};
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One possibility is to introduce a second layer to hot hierarchy. Derive IShuttle from IProduct, and derive that group from it. Then add an IShuttleProducer that yields an IShuttle* instead of IProduct*. This is okay, because C++ allows covariant return types for virtual functions... so long as the the new return type derives from the original, it is still considered an override.

But your design probably needs some rethinking either way.

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