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In the code below, I'm checking to see if the window is being scrolled past a certain point and if it is, change an element to use fixed position so that it doesn't scroll off the top of the page. The only problem is that is seems to be HIGHLY client-side-memory intensive (and really bogs down the scrolling speed) because at every single scroll pixel I am updating the style attributes over and over on the element.

Would checking if the attr is already there before attempting to update it make a significant difference? Is there a completely different and more efficient practice to get the same result?

$(window).scroll(function () {
    var headerBottom = 165;
    var fcHeight = $("#pnlMainNavContainer").height();

    var ScrollTop = $(window).scrollTop();
    if (ScrollTop > headerBottom) {
        $("#HeaderContentBuffer").attr("style", "margin-top:" + (fcHeight) + "px;");
        $("#AddFieldsContainer").attr("style", "position:fixed;width:320px;top:70px;left:41px;");
    } else {
        $("#HeaderContentBuffer").attr("style", "margin-top: 0px;");
        $("#AddFieldsContainer").removeAttr("style");
    }
});

As I'm typing this, I notice that StackOverflow.com using the same type of functionality with their yellow "Similar Questions" and "Help" menus on the right hand side of this page. I wonder how they do it.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 21 down vote accepted

One technique you can use is to set a timer on the scroll event and only do the main work when the scroll position hasn't changed for a short period of time. I use that technique on resize events which have the same issue. You can experiment with what timeout value seems to work right. A shorter time updates more frequently but runs more often during the scroll, a longer time doesn't run as often. You will have to experiment with what timeout value works best for your purposes and it would be best to test on a relatively slow computer since that's where the issue of scroll lag would be most pronounced.

Here's the general idea for how to do that:

var scrollTimer = null;
$(window).scroll(function () {
    if (scrollTimer) {
        clearTimeout(scrollTimer);   // clear any previous pending timer
    }
    scrollTimer = setTimeout(handleScroll, 500);   // set new timer
}

function handleScroll() {
    scrollTimer = null;
    var headerBottom = 165;
    var fcHeight = $("#pnlMainNavContainer").height();

    var ScrollTop = $(window).scrollTop();
    if (ScrollTop > headerBottom) {
        $("#HeaderContentBuffer").attr("style", "margin-top:" + (fcHeight) + "px;");
        $("#AddFieldsContainer").attr("style", "position:fixed;width:320px;top:70px;left:41px;");
    } else {
        $("#HeaderContentBuffer").attr("style", "margin-top: 0px;");
        $("#AddFieldsContainer").removeAttr("style");
    }
}

You may also be able to speed up your scroll function by caching some of the selectors when the scrolling first starts so they don't have to be recalculated each time. This is one place where the extra overhead of creating a jQuery object each time might not be helping you.


Here's a jQuery add-on method that handles the scrolling timer for you:

(function($) {
    var uniqueCntr = 0;
    $.fn.scrolled = function (waitTime, fn) {
        if (typeof waitTime === "function") {
            fn = waitTime;
            waitTime = 500;
        }
        var tag = "scrollTimer" + uniqueCntr++;
        this.scroll(function () {
            var self = $(this);
            var timer = self.data(tag);
            if (timer) {
                clearTimeout(timer);
            }
            timer = setTimeout(function () {
                self.removeData(tag);
                fn.call(self[0]);
            }, waitTime);
            self.data(tag, timer);
        });
    }
})(jQuery);

Working demo: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/KHeZY/

Your code would then be implemented like this:

$(window).scrolled(function() {
    var headerBottom = 165;
    var fcHeight = $("#pnlMainNavContainer").height();

    var ScrollTop = $(window).scrollTop();
    if (ScrollTop > headerBottom) {
        $("#HeaderContentBuffer").attr("style", "margin-top:" + (fcHeight) + "px;");
        $("#AddFieldsContainer").attr("style", "position:fixed;width:320px;top:70px;left:41px;");
    } else {
        $("#HeaderContentBuffer").attr("style", "margin-top: 0px;");
        $("#AddFieldsContainer").removeAttr("style");
    }
});
share|improve this answer
1  
Friggin' worked like a charm!!! thanks! :) –  EdenMachine Sep 12 '11 at 22:36
    
Brilliant code! I love it! I found that not resetting scrollTimer to null in handleScroll() doesn't seem to affect the functionality. –  Hengjie Jul 16 '12 at 23:43
1  
@Hengjie - not resetting scrollTimer when the timer fires potentially causes you to later call clearTimeout() on a timer object that is no longer active. You aren't supposed to do that, thus it is more correct to set to null so we know the timer is no longer active and won't call clearTimeout() on it in the future. Probably browsers are protecting against bad calls to clearTimeout(), but I like to code correctly. –  jfriend00 Jul 16 '12 at 23:48
    
Brilliant one. Thanks a lot –  Gopinath Sep 10 '12 at 21:40
    
I added a jQuery add-on method that would handle the delayed scrolling for you. –  jfriend00 Oct 18 '12 at 13:09

I have found this method to be much more efficeint for $(window).scroll()

var userScrolled = false;

$(window).scroll(function() {
  userScrolled = true;
});

setInterval(function() {
  if (userScrolled) {

    //Do stuff


    userScrolled = false;
  }
}, 50);

Check out John Resig's post on this topic.

An even more performant solution would be to set a a longer interval that detects if you are close to the bottom or top of the page. That way, you wouldn't even have to use $(window).scroll()

share|improve this answer
    
why keep running a function even when the scroll did not happen just to check if scroll happened? I prefer the selected answer approach. –  Lucky Soni Dec 6 '13 at 16:17
    
yeah, I agree with Lucky –  Jair Reina Jan 4 at 4:46
    
The selected answer didn't work for my case, as the selected answer doesn't fire any event if scrolling is still in progress. I needed my event to fire as soon as possible, not when scrolling has ended. Thanks Sam! –  aurevilly Jun 25 at 19:52

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