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I am very new at C++ and deeply appreciate your help!

I am trying to make a 'If' condition for a string, that is, for example:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
string message = "HELP";
int password;
cout<<"Please enter password";
cin<<password;
if (password = message);
}
else {
cout<<"Please try again...";
}
cin.ignor()
}

However Int is not for strings I believe and of course on Code::Blocks it posts the error that it doesn't function in such case. So basicaly just when someone on C++ saves a variable for int X; X = 3; for example, how can we do that with letters so that I can pop if condition message boxes!

Again thanks for helping! =D

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closed as unclear what you're asking by bensiu, Avadhani Y, Code Lღver, Sameera Thilakasiri, mishik Jul 19 '13 at 5:33

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
You should really read something about C++ first, you don't have the basic syntax right. –  Let_Me_Be Sep 12 '11 at 18:31
1  
Please turn on your compiler warnings. –  GManNickG Sep 12 '11 at 18:33
1  
There are at least 6 things wrong in the 15 lines, you should really get some introductory book and try again, look at the compiler errors (they are hard at first, but try to see where they point and what they say), try to fix them from the first to the last... compile with full warnings, and fix them too. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 12 '11 at 19:06
    
You really should follow a book, study the language before trying to code something. –  Riccardo Sep 12 '11 at 19:36

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What you probably want to do is:

#include <iostream>

// using namespace std; don't do this (its just lazy)
// Also its a bad habit to get into.

int main()
{
    std::string message = "HELP";

    // int password;  I assume you want a password to be a string
    std::string password;

    std::cout << "Please enter password"\n; // Added \n to make it print nicely.
    // cin<<password; The << is wrong should be >>
    //
    //                Bu this reads a single word (separated by spaces).
    //                If you want the password to hold multiple words then you need
    //                 to read the line.
    std::getline(std::cin, password);


    // if (password = message);  This is assignment. You assign message to password.
    //                           Also the ';' here means that nothing happens 
    //                           if it was true
    //
    //                           You are then trying to test the result of the 
    //                           assignment which luckily does not work.
    //                           Use the '==' to test for equality.
    if (password == message)
    {
    }
    else
    {
        cout << "Please try again...";
    }

    // cin.ignor()  This does nothing.
    //              What you are trying to do is get the program to wait 
    //              for user input. You should do something like this:

    std::cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max()); // Flush the buffer
    std::cout << "Hit enter to continue\n";
    std::cin.get(); 
}
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omg thanks dude, you bothered typing all that, it means a lot to me =D –  Jawad Itani Sep 12 '11 at 22:16

= is assignment. == is comparision. Also, don't put semicolon after the if statement.

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2  
Plus he doesn't have the if syntax and blocks right. –  Let_Me_Be Sep 12 '11 at 18:30
#include <iostream> 

using namespace std; 

int main() 
{ 
   string message = "HELP"; 
   string password; 
   cout << "Please enter password"; 
   cin >> password; 
   if (password != message) 
   { 
      cout << "Please try again..."; 
   }
   return 0; 
}  

Should work a little better.

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Thanks dude! this is helpful and makes a lot of sense –  Jawad Itani Sep 12 '11 at 22:14

This is the first problem:

int password;

The data type of password should be std::string as well, because message is std::string (which contains the valid password).

So the first fix is this:

std::string password;

Second problem is that you're using '=' in if. Use '==' (equality operator), not '=' (assignment operator).

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and learn the syntax of if –  Let_Me_Be Sep 12 '11 at 18:32
    
Omg thanks dude, now everything makes sense. –  Jawad Itani Sep 12 '11 at 22:12

First off, if you want the password to be anything, not just a number, use std::string. To compare two values, use == NOT =.

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::string s1("First string");
    std::string s2("Second string");

    if(s1 != s2) {
        std::cout << "Strings don't match!" << std::endl;
    }
}

In your code, you also didn't properly close all blocks and misspelled cin.ignore().

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You used the wrong operator on the if condition. You used = which is the assignment operator. You need to use == which is comparison. You also have a semi-colon after the if which doesn't belong and your braces for the statements aren't right,

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