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I want to deprecate some, but not all possible enumeration values.

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3  
How hard is it to type “@Deprecated” in front of one of your enum values? –  Bombe Sep 12 '11 at 18:42
3  
@Bombe please don't flame new programmers for not knowing something that is simple in your eyes. –  Jesper Sep 12 '11 at 18:46
2  
@Jesper not trying whether the compiler accepts it has nothing to do with not knowing something; it’s a sign of a state of mind that I personally deem quite unfit for programming. You won’t get anywhere if you have to ask somebody every time you are not sure whether A or B works. –  Bombe Sep 12 '11 at 19:04
3  
@Jesper now you’re nitpicking. Steve obviously knew about deprecation so the chances that he also knew how to deprecate something are rather high. And I stand by my opinion that the pure lack of imagination to simply try that exact same method on an enum value is something that will seriously hamper his future programming career. –  Bombe Sep 13 '11 at 4:26
3  
@Bombe - Hey! Sorry to jump back in 2-1/2 years later. I'm not a new programmer, nor was I then. I often "try things". You don't need to worry about my development as a programmer. My confusion stemmed solely from a lack of familiarity with annotations. I had much familiarity with the older style of deprecation through javadocs. Hence the question. But thanks for being so patronizing. It added tons of value to the discussion. –  Steve Cohen Apr 28 '14 at 20:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Yes, put a @Deprecated annotation on them. For example:

enum Status {
    OK,
    ERROR,

    @Deprecated
    PROBLEM
}

You can also add a JavaDoc @deprecated tag to document it:

enum Status {
    OK,
    ERROR,

    /**
     * @deprecated Use ERROR instead.
     */
    @Deprecated
    PROBLEM
}
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1  
I've always (well, occasionally) wondered why the @Deprecated annotation type doesn't allow a value for that purpose. –  Barend Sep 12 '11 at 18:38
1  
"Don't use this value" is a useless comment. It doesn't say anything other than the deprecated annotation. A deprecation comment should tell by what the value is replaced. –  JB Nizet Sep 12 '11 at 18:39
    
@JB Nizet this was ofcourse only to demonstrate the principle. I changed it. –  Jesper Sep 12 '11 at 18:39
    
Yes, I have never used annotations much. I am more familiar with deprecation via comments. the @Deprecated solution is just what I was looking for, thanks. –  Steve Cohen Sep 12 '11 at 19:06
public enum Characters {
    STAN,
    KYLE,
    CARTMAN,
    @Deprecated KENNY
}
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+1, For South Park reference –  mre Sep 12 '11 at 18:34
12  
OH MY GOD! THEY DEPRECATED KENNY! –  Bombe Sep 12 '11 at 18:41
    
+1 again for deprecating Kenny... –  home Sep 12 '11 at 18:53
2  
@Bombe you bastards! –  Foo Bah Sep 12 '11 at 21:23

Just tried it eclipse, it works (didn't you try it?):

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] arg) {

        System.err.println(EnumTest.A);
        System.err.println(EnumTest.B);

    }

    public static enum EnumTest {
        A, @Deprecated B, C, D, E;
    }

}
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