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I have a problem with my sql query in mysql. in sqlite3 and sql server all works.

SELECT        `buildings`.*
FROM          `buildings`
  INNER JOIN  "floors"
  ON          "floors"."building_id" = "buildings"."id"
  INNER JOIN  "spaces"
  ON          "spaces".floor_id = "floors".id

maybe i need to process on other way in mysql?

thanks

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What's happening/not working when you run this in mysql? –  Joe Stefanelli Sep 12 '11 at 18:53
    
remove all the back tick and double quote and try again –  ajreal Sep 12 '11 at 18:53
    
What is the problem with your query in MySQL ? Any specific error is returned ? The results are not what you expected ? Please clarify. –  Richard.P Sep 12 '11 at 18:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

MySQL treat words in quotes ("floors") as strings, so those values are NOT used as table/field names. Try

SELECT ...
...
INNER JOIN floors ON floors.building_id = buildings.id
INNER JOIN spaces ON spaces.floor_id = floors.id

instead. Backticks around table/field names are required ONLY when the table/field name is a reserved word. buildings is not a reserved word, so no backticks are necessary.

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+1 for being 53 seconds faster :) –  Jason McCreary Sep 12 '11 at 18:55

ANSI_QUOTES may not be enabled. From the manual ref:

If the ANSI_QUOTES SQL mode is enabled, it is also permissible to quote identifiers within double quotation marks:

mysql> CREATE TABLE "test" (col INT);
ERROR 1064: You have an error in your SQL syntax...
mysql> SET sql_mode='ANSI_QUOTES';
mysql> CREATE TABLE "test" (col INT);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

Make sure ANSI_QUOTES is enabled, or just stick with the traditional backtick (`)

This is also, from your vague question, assuming I have the correct problem to chase.

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SELECT        `buildings`.*
FROM          `buildings`
  INNER JOIN  `floors`
  ON          `floors`.`building_id` = `buildings`.`id`
  INNER JOIN  `spaces`
  ON          `spaces`.`floor_id` = `floors`.`id`

or

SELECT        buildings.*
FROM          buildings
  INNER JOIN  floors
  ON          floors.building_id = buildings.id
  INNER JOIN  spaces
  ON          spaces.floor_id = floors.id

Do not use : ". This is for String in MySql.

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Thanks for your help guys, someone told me i can put my inner join in my where clause, what is the best ? finally i removed my double quote and all works. –  neimad Sep 12 '11 at 19:14
    
Do not put the joining function in the where clause. Where clause is to filter down the result only. You could but it will be harder to maintain in the long run. –  Patrick Desjardins Sep 13 '11 at 13:15

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