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Consider the following extensions:

public static class ReaderWriteExt
{
    public static void ExecWriteAction(this ReaderWriterLockSlim rwlock, Action action)
    {
        rwlock.EnterWriteLock();
        try
        {
            action();
        }
        finally
        {
            rwlock.ExitWriteLock();
        }
    }
    public static void ExecUpgradeableReadAction(this ReaderWriterLockSlim rwlock, Action action)
    {
        rwlock.EnterUpgradeableReadLock();
        try
        {
            action();
        }
        finally
        {
            rwlock.ExitUpgradeableReadLock();
        }
    }
}

Also consider the following sample usage (stripped of some supporting code):

private static ReaderWriterLockSlim _rwlock = new ReaderWriterLockSlim();
private static ... _cacheEntries = ....;

public static void RemoveEntry(string name)
{
    WeakReference outValue = null;
    _rwlock.ExecUpgradeableReadAction(() =>
        {                    
            if (_cacheEntries.TryGetValue(name, out outValue))
            {
                if (!outValue.IsAlive)
                {
                    _rwlock.ExecWriteAction(() => _cacheEntries.Remove(name));
                }
            }
        });
}

I'm new to C# coding and I was unable to find enough information about these topics that could guide me. To my question: I am considering using this concept in our production code, is it a bad idea? What can go wrong?

share|improve this question
    
We don't know what's in ReaderWriterLockSlim class. Also, you have rwlock.EnterUpgradeableReadLock(); two times, when it should be ExitUpgradeableReadLock() the second time. –  Maxim V. Pavlov Sep 12 '11 at 20:40
1  
@Maxim: Thanks for the edit note, and ReaderWriterLockSlim was introduced in .NET 3.5. –  Jack Sep 12 '11 at 20:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That seems fine to me except that the code looks very cumbersome

I would probably implement IDisposable as:

public class WriteLock : IDisposable
{
   ReaderWriterLockSlim _rwlock;
   public WriteLock(ReaderWriterLockSlim rwlock ) 
   { 
      _rwlock = rwlock;
      _rwlock.EnterWriteLock(); 
   }
   public void Dispose()
   {
      _rwlock.ExitWriteLock(); 
   }
}

Usage:

 private ReaderWriterLockSlim _rwlock = new ReaderWriterLockSlim();

 //...

 using (new WriteLock(_rwlock)) //<-- here the constructor calls EnterWriteLock
 {
      _cacheEntries.Remove(name);

 } //<---here Dispose method gets called automatically which calls ExitWriteLock

Similarly, you can implement UpgradeableReadLock class implementing IDisposable interface.

The idea is that you can create an instance of disposable class in using construct which ensures that in the constructor you enter into write lock by calling EnterWriteLock() method, and when it goes out of scope, Dispose() method is called automatically (by CLR) which calls ExitWriteLock() method.

Note that it will not dispose ReaderWriterLockSlim object; it will dispose WriteLock object which is just a wrapper. ReaderWriterLockSlim will be as such in the user-class.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah okay, I think this leads to more readable code, but are there technical reasons not to use my concept? –  Jack Sep 12 '11 at 20:47
    
@Jack: That seems fine to me except that the code looks very cumbersome. –  Nawaz Sep 12 '11 at 20:49
1  
Your code will dispose the ReaderriterLockSlim after usage. The point of this class is synchronize access between two threads, so probably there are at least two threads accessing the variable, and both will try to dispose the object, generating a ObjectDisposedException. I think... :P –  vtortola Sep 12 '11 at 20:58
    
@vtortola: It will not dispose ReaderWriterLockSlim object; it will dispose WriteLock object which is just a wrapper. ReaderWriterLockSlim will be as such in the user-class. –  Nawaz Sep 12 '11 at 21:01
1  
@Nawaz right, sorry. –  vtortola Sep 12 '11 at 21:12

I am not seeing any reason why that would not work safely. However, I have a suspicion that it will actually be slower than using a plain old lock. The reason is because ReaderWriterLockSlim has about 2x the overhead as compared to a lock.1 So you would you need the execution of the code in the critical section to consume a sufficient enough number of CPU cycles to overcome this added overhead just to reach the breakeven point. If all you are doing is simply accessing a Dictionary (or whatever data structure _cacheEntries happens to be) then I doubt RWLS is right for the situation. Reader-writer locks tend to work better in scenarios where the number of readers significantly outnumbers the writers and when the guarded section of code is long and drawn out. Obviously you should do your own benchmark tests because mileage will vary considerably depending on a lot of other factors. The degrees of parallelism and the number of cores in the hardware could give you more throughput using RWLS even though a simple breakeven point analysis did not favor them initially.


1Based on my own tests. ReaderWriterLock had about 5x the overhead.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response, and the further feedback beyond the scope of my question. Your feedback serves to address excellent points that junior programmers should be aware of. –  Jack Sep 12 '11 at 21:07

Yes, there are technical reasons why this is not a good idea. If the Action throws an exception when updating the data, then the data is now in an unknown and very likely corrupt state. Your code unconditionally releases the writer lock, meaning that other threads are now accessing the partially-updated shared state. This is a recipe for disaster.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, I was thinking about this problem as well. –  Jack Sep 12 '11 at 22:21
    
@Jim: I know, that was a long time ago, but anyway I want to ask a question: why this is a recipe for disaster? Using RWLock manually you should anyway release a lock in finally clause. This means that using RWLock is a recipe for disaster anyway. –  Sergey Teplyakov Jan 25 '14 at 14:21
    
@SergeyTeplyakov: See blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/03/06/… –  Jim Mischel Jan 27 '14 at 14:01
    
@JimMischel: thanks a lot, I now about this post and about that one: joeduffyblog.com/2007/01/29/… But this is an issue with all locks but not with this specific technique. –  Sergey Teplyakov Jan 27 '14 at 21:02

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