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Here is a code which is for my homework. On line 10 I am having problem with double to float conversion and I am not sure why it is in place. Any tips please? PS. Code isn't finished.

More info, it is about number 29.99 which is declared as float but here is in double form, I suppose.

using System;

namespace Lab_3
{
    class BookTest
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Book book1 = new Book();
            Book book2 = new Book("Advenced C#", "Joe", "Robertson", 29.99, "PUC Press");
        }
    }

    public class Book
    {
        string authorFirstName;
        string authorLastName;
        float price;
        string publisherName;
        string title;

        public Book()
        {
        }

        public Book(string bookTitle, string firstName, string lastName, float bookPrice, string publisher)
        {
            authorFirstName = firstName;
            authorLastName = lastName;
            price = bookPrice;
            publisherName = publisher;
            title = bookTitle;
        }

        public void display()
        {
        }

        public string getAuthorName()
        {
            return 0;
        }

        public string AuthorFirstName
        {
            get
            {
                return authorFirstName;
            }
            set
            {
                authorFirstName = value;
            }
        }
        public string AuthorLastName
        {
            get
            {
                return authorLastName;
            }
            set
            {
                authorLastName = value;
            }
        }
        public float Price
        {
            set
            {
                price = value;
            }
        }
        public string PublisherName
        {
            set
            {
                publisherName = value;
            }
        }
        public string Title
        {
            set
            {
                title = value;
            }
        }

    }
}

EDIT:

Thanks for help! Problem is solved and explanation helped me cleared some things out.

share|improve this question
    
There's no question here. I voted to close as such –  Andrew Barber Sep 12 '11 at 21:34
    
What is the error you are getting? –  Tejs Sep 12 '11 at 21:35
    
Oh, look at comments for one of answers. –  HelpNeeder Sep 12 '11 at 21:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try

Book book2 = new Book("Advenced C#", "Joe", "Robertson", 29.99f, "PUC Press");
share|improve this answer
    
Error CS1503: Argument #4' cannot convert double' expression to type `float' (CS1503) (Lab 3) –  HelpNeeder Sep 12 '11 at 21:37
    
And: Error CS1502: The best overloaded method match for `Lab_3.Book.Book(string, string, string, float, string)' has some invalid arguments (CS1502) (Lab 3) –  HelpNeeder Sep 12 '11 at 21:37
    
I knew it's something simple. Thank you. –  HelpNeeder Sep 12 '11 at 21:39

The literal 29.99 is a double literal, and there's no implicit conversion from double to float. Options:

  • Use a float literal with an f suffix: 29.99
  • Cast to float: (float) 29.99
  • Avoid using binary floating point numbers for prices, change the parameter type to decimal and the argument to 29.99m.

I would strongly advise the last approach - prices (and "artificial" values in general) are not a good fit for binary floating point numbers. People tend to assume that decimal values will be preserved exactly, which means it's a better fit for decimal floating point numbers.

I have articles on binary floating point numbers and decimal floating point numbers which you may find useful.

So just to be clear, your constructor would look like this (I've renamed the parameters slightly):

public Book(string title, string authorFirstName, string authorLastName,
            decimal price, string publisher)

and you'd call it like this:

Book book2 = new Book("Advenced C#", "Joe", "Robertson", 29.99m, "PUC Press");
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip. –  HelpNeeder Sep 12 '11 at 21:41
    
Although I am asked to use float, in which case 29.99f is a must. And tip about how to handle decimal is also very helpful. –  HelpNeeder Sep 12 '11 at 21:42
    
Agreed. Do not use floating point to store currency. You will lose pennies when rounding. –  Roman Royter Sep 12 '11 at 21:42
5  
@HelpNeeder: Yep, these guys are absolutely right. If your professor is telling you to use floats for financial calculations get a better professor because that is dangerously wrong. Floats are for physics calculations where the difference between 6.0280000001 and 6.027999999 is irrelevant; those kinds of differences are relevant when performing financial calculations. Decimals are specifically designed for financial calculations. –  Eric Lippert Sep 12 '11 at 21:45
2  
Well, I's beginning of the semester. Maybe such example just getting us around into using C#. Point well understood. I'll point out fact to professor and see what he'll say. –  HelpNeeder Sep 12 '11 at 21:48

Use:

Book book2 = new Book("Advenced C#", "Joe", "Robertson", 29.99F, "PUC Press");
share|improve this answer

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