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Here I asked a question about izip_longest function from itertools module.

The code of it:

def izip_longest_from_docs(*args, **kwds):
    # izip_longest('ABCD', 'xy', fillvalue='-') --> Ax By C- D-
    fillvalue = kwds.get('fillvalue')
    def sentinel(counter = ([fillvalue]*(len(args)-1)).pop):
        yield counter()         # yields the fillvalue, or raises IndexError
    fillers = repeat(fillvalue)
    iters = [chain(it, sentinel(), fillers) for it in args]
    try:
        for tup in izip(*iters):
            yield tup
    except IndexError:
        pass

There appeared to be an error in the documentation in the pure Python equivalent of that function. The error was that the real function did and the abovementioned equivalent didn't propagate IndexError exceptions that were raised inside the generators sent as the function parameters.

@agf solved the problem and gave a corrected version of the pure Python equivalent.

But at the same time when he was writing his solution I made my own. And while making it I faced one problem which I hope will be unraveled by asking this question.

The code that I came up with is this:

def izip_longest_modified_my(*args, **kwds):
    # izip_longest('ABCD', 'xy', fillvalue='-') --> Ax By C- D-
    fillvalue = kwds.get('fillvalue')

    class LongestExhausted(Exception):
        pass

    def sentinel(fillvalue = fillvalue, counter = [0]):
        def ret():
            counter[0] += 1
            if counter[0] == len(args):
                raise LongestExhausted
            yield fillvalue
        return ret()

    fillers = repeat(fillvalue)
    iters = [chain(it, sentinel(), fillers) for it in args]
    try:
        for tup in izip(*iters):
            yield tup
    except LongestExhausted:
        pass 

In the original code sentinel is a generator which implements lazy evaluation. So that counter() is returned only when it's actually needed by the iterator created using chain function.

In my code I added a counter which holds a list of one value [0]. The reason for that was to put a mutable object into some place where it can be accessed by all the returned iterators ret() and changed by them. The only place I found suitable was in the function_defaults of sentinel.

If I put it inside the sentinel function, then the counter would be assigned to [0] on every call of sentinel and that would be different lists for all the ret()s:

def sentinel(fillvalue = fillvalue):
    counter = [0]
    def ret():
        counter[0] += 1
        if counter[0] == len(args):
            raise LongestExhausted
        yield fillvalue
    return ret()

I tried to put it outside of the sentinel function:

counter = 0
def sentinel(fillvalue = fillvalue):
    def ret():
        counter += 1
        if counter == len(args):
            raise LongestExhausted
        yield fillvalue
    return ret()

But the exception rose: UnboundLocalError: local variable 'counter' referenced before assignment.

I added global keyword, but it didn't help (I think because counter is really not in the global scope):

counter = 0
def sentinel(fillvalue = fillvalue):
    global counter
    def ret():
        counter += 1
        if counter == len(args):
            raise LongestExhausted
        yield fillvalue
    return ret()

So, my question is:

Is the approach that I used (to put mutable list counter = [0] to function_defaults) the best in this case, or there is some better way to solve this problem?

share|improve this question
2  
This has been asked many times in many forms. Read any number of other questions about mutable default arguments and the new Python 3 nonlocal keyword. –  agf Sep 12 '11 at 22:23
    
In your last code snippet, counter is local to ret, not to sentinel, so if you want to use the global (i.e. module-level) counter, you need to put the global declaration in ret. (I haven't really absorbed the rest of your question; I'm only responding to your UnboundLocalError.) –  John Y Sep 12 '11 at 22:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This has been asked many times in many forms. Read any number of other questions about mutable default arguments and the new Python 3 nonlocal keyword. On Python 2, you could use a function attribute:

def sentinel(fillvalue = fillvalue):
    def ret():
        sentinel.counter += 1
        if sentinel.counter == len(args):
            raise LongestExhausted
        yield fillvalue
    return ret()
sentinel.counter = 0

or use global both inside ret and inside izip_longest so you're always referencing a global variable:

global counter
counter = 0
def sentinel(fillvalue = fillvalue):
    def ret():
        global counter
        counter += 1
        if counter == len(args):
            raise LongestExhausted
        yield fillvalue
    return ret()

However, using global restricts you to only one izip_longest at a time -- see the comments on the other answer.

You're also defining a new ret every time sentinel is called (once per iterator) -- you could instead do something like

global counter
counter = 0
arglen = len(args)

def ret():
    global counter
    counter += 1
    if counter == arglen:
        raise LongestExhausted
    return fillvalue

def sentinel():
    yield ret()

Example code for having sentinel outside izip_longest in re your question from the comments:

def sentinel(counter, arglen, fillvalue):
    def ret():
        counter[0] += 1
        if counter[0] == arglen:
            raise LongestExhausted
        yield fillvalue
    return ret()


def izip_longest_modified_my(*args, **kwds):
    # izip_longest('ABCD', 'xy', fillvalue='-') --> Ax By C- D-
    fillvalue = kwds.get('fillvalue')

    class LongestExhausted(Exception):
        pass

    fillers = repeat(fillvalue)
    counter = [0]
    arglen = len(args)
    iters = [chain(it, sentinel(counter, arglen, fillvalue), fillers) for it in args]
    try:
        for tup in izip(*iters):
            yield tup
    except LongestExhausted:
        pass

Here you're again using a list just as a container to get around the problems accessing outer scopes in Python 2.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Placing global into both ret and izip_longest did work! –  ovgolovin Sep 12 '11 at 22:38
    
And what about my approach where I put it into function_defaults? Is it OK to do it this way? –  ovgolovin Sep 12 '11 at 22:39
    
Thanks about pointing out that ret should be placed outside of sentinel. I think it's a really good suggestion. –  ovgolovin Sep 12 '11 at 22:43
    
@ovgo It's certainly "OK" in that it works, but using a mutable default argument just as a container isn't considered good coding style. If you're just using the default to simulate a function attribute (which you are) just use a real function attribute. –  agf Sep 12 '11 at 22:43
1  
#1: Think of it sort of like a class vs. a class instance. The def line and any function attributes are like the class itself, while the body of the function is like the class instance. So any function bodies that exist in parallel refer to the same default parameters and the same function name / attributes. #2: Yes. Since you're never assigning to counter in sentinel (only to the first item of counter), it will automatically search outer scopes for the name, and will see the counter created in izip_longest. I'll add example code for this to my answer. –  agf Sep 13 '11 at 19:22

Using a global is a bad idea, IMHO. You need to make sure to reset the counter properly between calls. But more seriously this is a generator; you don't even need threading to have multiple calls to a generator in flight at the same time, which will wreck havoc with any attempt to sanely use a global to keep track of state.

You could just explicitly pass a reference to a mutable object into sentinel, and then into ret. It looks like your code controls all the calls to them. Function parameters are the original and boring way of transferring references between scopes!

share|improve this answer
    
Can you elaborate on 'resetting counters between calls' and 'not needing threading'? I don't get the ideas. –  ovgolovin Sep 12 '11 at 23:06
    
What happens if I write a = izip_longest(...); do_stuff_with(a); b = izip_longest(...); do_stuff_with_b()? The global counter needs to be reset at the end of izip_longest, otherwise it won't start from zero when I call izip_longest to get b. But that doesn't fix the problem, because I could have also done a = izip_longest(...); b = izip_longest(...); do_stuff_with_a_and_b(). Here now you have two calls to the generator running at the same time, trying to use the same global variable as a counter. Plus of course, you could have two different threads that both call izip_longest. –  Ben Sep 13 '11 at 0:06
    
@ovgo He means that by using a global, if you've got multiple izip_longests going at the same time, it won't work right, i.e. izip_longest(gen1(), izip_longest(gen1(), gen2()), because they'll share the same counter. The nonlocal, default argument, or function attribute methods will all work correctly in this situation, because the counter will be local to the generator created by each call to izip_longest. –  agf Sep 13 '11 at 0:10
1  
Ben, make sure to ping the person you're trying to talk to with an @ so they see it. –  agf Sep 13 '11 at 0:11
    
@agf: Oh, I thought that was just a disambiguation convention. Does it actually influence when StackOverflow notifies you about replies? –  Ben Sep 13 '11 at 0:36

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