Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two user controls inside an ASPX page. All I want to do is pass one single int from one control to the other during page load.

I have tried several of the examples on here but none of them work - sorry I mean I can't get them to work! Here's what I've got:

Default.ASPX

public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        ucBottom.varBottomID = ucTop.varBottomID;     
    }
}

UCTOP

public partial class ucTop : System.Web.UI.UserControl
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        int varBottomID = 100;
    }
}

UCBOTTOM

public partial class ucBottom : System.Web.UI.UserControl
{
    public int varBottomID { get; set; }

    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        BottomText.Text = Convert.ToUInt32(varBottomID).ToString();
    }
}

There are no errors except for BottomText.Text returning 0 instead of 100. Also int varBottomID = 100; is stating that it is assigned but never used (ucTop).

From one of the answers here it's good practice for one UC not to be aware of the other and to use the parent to pass data. But alas not for me.

As always, any help would be appreciated (but in a below dummies guide format!).

EDIT - Sorry A typo crept in the code in Default...

share|improve this question
    
Did you mean to have ucTop.varBottomID = ucBottom.varBottomID; in _Default's Page_load? –  Bala R Sep 12 '11 at 23:09
    
No that was a typo! –  ComfortablyNumb Sep 13 '11 at 9:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your main page, it's not really changing anything -- it's setting ucBottom.varBottomID to itself. (Edit: appears to have been fixed)

In ucTop, int varBottomID = 100; does nothing -- it sets a variable inside the function, which won't be visible outside.

The result of those two issues is that you never end up having anything communicated from ucTop to ucBottom.

(BTW, convention is to start class names with an uppercase letter, and instance names with a lowercase letter. It's not exactly obvious from looking at the code whether you're attempting to access static or instance members of your classes. From here on i'm assuming you have a ucBottom control, which is an instance of the ucBottom class, and the same for ucTop. It's the only case i see where your code, as pasted, would compile without errors.)

You may need something similar to:

public partial class _Default : Page
{
    protected void Page_Load(sender obj, EventArgs e)
    {
        ucBottom.varBottomID = ucTop.varBottomID; // fix the first issue
    }
}

public partial class ucTop : UserControl
{
     public int varBottomID { get; set; } // fix the second issue
     protected void Page_Load(object src, EventArgs e)
     {
         varBottomID = 100;
     }
}

You will also need to pick different events to trigger on, if you go this route. If everything triggers on Load, you have a problem -- Load fires on the page first, then on the child controls. So the property won't get set correctly. (The setting goes in 3 steps: ucTop deciding the correct value to set, _Default setting it from top to bottom, and ucBottom using it. You need that sequence to go decide, set, use in order for it to work correctly, but if everything triggers on Load you'll end up with set, decide, use or set, use, decide.) You might consider letting _Default do its thing on LoadComplete, and ucBottom on PreRender.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help. What I am trying to achieve is the passing of data for a shopping cart. ucTop shows a summary of the cart or states that the cart is empty while ucBottom shows the cart contents. The use of user controls was to make the cart modular. Would it be best to take the next step and create a ShoppingCart Class for the data which the UCs can pull from. I'm guessing, but this would negate the issue of render order??? Sorry I'm really new to ASP.Net and especially c~ and I know I'm running before I can walk! –  ComfortablyNumb Sep 13 '11 at 10:12
    
A shopping cart usually stuffs its data into the session, or into a table in the DB, rather than passing variables around like this. If you do either of those, then it'd probably simplify things. But yeah, the cart is a separate and definable "thing", and building a class for that thing might not be a bad idea. –  cHao Sep 13 '11 at 13:18
    
Event order's still important, as there will be cases where you want info about the cart after your controls have done their thing to it. LoadComplete happens after all the controls' form event handlers and such have fired, so it's an ideal place to do stuff that relies on the controls to have set the current state of things. However, AFAIK it only happens in the Page, not in the child controls. A child control might use the PreRender event instead, which happens just before ASP.net starts outputting HTML. –  cHao Sep 13 '11 at 13:34
    
My cart data is db driven and all im passing around is a sessionid. However, I just need to pass a couple of flags around to adjust the look/functionality of the cart (delete cart items, recalc cart etc). I'm now building a cart class which is much better and doing what I wanted to do in the first place. Thank you again for all you help. –  ComfortablyNumb Sep 15 '11 at 11:28

Modify your code as needed.

public partial class ucTop : System.Web.UI.UserControl
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        ucBottom.varBottomID = 100;
    }
}


public partial class ucBottom : System.Web.UI.UserControl
{
    public int varBottomID { get; set; }

    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        BottomText.Text = Convert.ToUInt32(varBottomID).ToString();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Warning: static members get really weird when the app's handling more than one request at a time. A single instance is shared between everything in the AppDomain, which is probably not what you want in this case. static should be used only for app-wide variables (stuff you'd stick in the Application object), and only if you're aware of the caveats. –  cHao Sep 12 '11 at 23:30
    
@cHao i didn't want to go into explaining best practices and stuff. I just wanted to solve his problem. Hopefully with time he'll figure out what's right and wrong to use :) –  scartag Sep 12 '11 at 23:51
    
Sorry, I got The name 'ucBottom' does not exist in the current context –  ComfortablyNumb Sep 13 '11 at 10:03
    
@ComfortablyNumb you'll need to replace ucButtom with actual ID of the control instance. if the control is used in your Default.aspx page you can look up the markup and check what the ID is. –  scartag Sep 13 '11 at 10:46

Defining a class which both UserControls could access a static variable would work:

public static class RequiredVars { public static int BottomID { get; set;} }

share|improve this answer
2  
Warning: static members get really weird when the app's handling more than one request at a time. A single instance is shared between everything in the AppDomain, which is probably not what you want in this case. static should be used only for app-wide variables (stuff you'd stick in the Application object), and only if you're aware of the caveats. –  cHao Sep 12 '11 at 23:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.