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I'm curious if there is a "better" design for the following behavior:

<?php
class Foo {
    public function foo() {
        // Foo-specific foo stuff.
    }
}

class Bar extends Foo {
    public function foo() {
        // Bar-specific foo stuff.
        parent::foo();
    }
}

class Baz extends Bar {
    public function foo() {
        // Baz-specific foo stuff.
        parent::foo();
    }
}

$boz = new Foo();
$boz->foo(); // should do the stuff in Foo::foo()

$biz = new Bar();
$biz->foo(); // should do the stuff in Bar::foo() and Foo::foo()

$buz = new Baz();
$buz->foo(); // should do the stuff in Baz::foo(), Bar::foo(), and Foo::foo()

// etc...

Essentially, I have a base class, Foo, with a method Foo::foo() that contains some common code that should always be run. I also have various subclasses which inherit from Foo and each have their own specific code that should also always be run.

The design I've used here uses the DRY principle to ensure that the code from Foo::foo() isn't repeated in Bar::foo() and Baz::foo(), and the code in Bar::foo() isn't repeated in Baz::foo(), and so on.

The problem(?) with this design is that I'm relying on the subclasses to always explicitly call parent::foo() in every case, and classes which extend those classes to do the same, and so on ad infinitum. However, there is no way (that I know of) to actually enforce this.

So my question is - is there a better design that accomplishes the same behavior, or some way to enforce this "contract" between parent/child classes?

Update

Some people have asked for a use-case. I have run into this paradigm in several projects over the years, but can't give a real world example due to NDAs and such, so here's a super basic example that might help illustrate the issue better:

<?php
// Vehicle
class Vehicle {
    public function start() {
        // Vehicle engines are on when you start them.
        // Unless they belong to me, that is :-(
        $this->setEngineStatus(Vehicle::ENGINE_ON);
    }
}

// Vehicle > Automobile
class Automobile extends Vehicle {
    public function start() {
        // Automobile engines are on when you start them.
        parent::start();

        // Automobiles idle when you start them.
        $this->setEngineRpm(Automobile::RPM_IDLE);
    }
}

// Vehicle > Airplane
class Airplane extends Vehicle {
    public function start() {
        // Airplane engines are on when you start them.
        parent::start();

        // Airplanes also have radios that need to be turned on when started.
        $this->setRadioStatus(Airplane::RADIO_ON);
    }
}

// Vehicle > Automobile > Car
class Car extends Automobile {
    public function start() {
        // Cars engines are on and idle when you start them.
        parent::start();

        // Cars also have dashboard lights that turn on when started.
        $this->setDashLightsStatus(Car::DASH_LIGHTS_ON);
    }
}

// Vehicle > Airplane > Jet
class Jet extends Airplane {
    public function start() {
        // Jet engines and radios are on when you start them.
        parent::start();

        // Jets also arm their weapons when started.
        $this->setWeaponsHot(true);
    }
}

// Vehicle > Automobile > BobsSuperAwesomeCustomTruck
class BobsSuperAwesomeCustomTruck extends Automobile {
    public function start() {
        // Uh-oh... Bob didn't call parent::start() in his class, so his trucks
        // don't work, with no errors or exceptions to help him figure out why.

        // Bob's trucks also need to reset their pinball machine highscores when started.
        $this->resetPinballScores();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You could design it so inheritance is abstract from the base class: php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.abstract.php –  Loz Cherone ツ Sep 12 '11 at 23:03
1  
I don't think there is, not only in php, but in any C-like programming language. Actually I don't think there is a better way in the OOP concepts. –  Tamer Shlash Sep 12 '11 at 23:04
    
@Lawrence, that doesn't enforce using parent::foo() within an extended class. –  Jon Stirling Sep 12 '11 at 23:06
2  
This is not specific to PHP. It's part of the OOP paradigm. Just like in real life, children inherit traits from the parent. The parent cannot enforce traits upon the child, grand-children, great-grand-children, etc. –  Herbert Sep 12 '11 at 23:22
    
That was a good metaphor, Herbert. –  drrcknlsn Sep 12 '11 at 23:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As long as you're overwriting your methods in subclasses, there is no way in any language I know of to enforce the behavior of the parent's method. If you're writing code just for your app, you should be able to trust your own code to call parent::foo(). But if you're writing a library, framework or API that others will build on, there is value to your idea. Ruby on Rails makes good use of that kind of behavior using callbacks.

Okay, so don't define any foo methods. Instead, use __call and an array of closures as callbacks. My PHP is really rusty, so I forget some of the specifics.

class Foo {
  // I forget how to make a class variable in PHP, but this should be one.
  // You could define as many callback chains as you like.
  $callbacks = array('foo_callback_chain' => []);

  // This should be a class function. Again, forget how.
  function add_callback($name, $callback) {
    $callbacks[$name.'_callback_chain'][] = $callback;
  }

  // Add your first callback
  add_callback('foo', function() {
    // do foo stuff
  })

  def method__call($method, $args) {
    // Actually, you might want to call them in reverse order, as that would be more similar
    foreach ( $callbacks[$method_name.'_callback_chain'] as $method ) {
      $method();
    }
  }
}

Then in your child classes, just append more callbacks with ""add_callback". This isn't appropriate for everything, but it works very well in some cases. (More about closures at http://php.net/manual/en/functions.anonymous.php.)

share|improve this answer
    
You're right, your PHP is very rusty lol. But your design is simple and elegant, and it works. Because the callback chain is both defined and incrementally added to through the chain, the "contract" can be enforced from within the base class, no matter how deep the inheritance goes. Genius :-) –  drrcknlsn Sep 13 '11 at 0:37
    
+1 Just happened to be looking up closures and callbacks last night. I was looking for a way to trigger a method with explicitely calling it or having a method doing some sort of dispatching to call both the parent and child. I believe these features are limited to PHP 5.3. Anyway, great answer bioneuralnet and happy to see you found a solution drrcknlsn :) . –  James Poulson Sep 13 '11 at 8:26

I dont think this is better, but this is one possible way.

class abstract Foo {
    public function foo() {
        // Foo-specific foo stuff.
        $this->_foo();
    }

    // Might be abstract, might be an empty implementation
    protected abstract function _foo();
}

class Bar extends Foo {
    protected function _foo() {
        // Bar-specific foo stuff.
    }
}

Personally, I prefer the way you have it because I think it is more readable. It also means the child does not have to have its own implementation of foo(). Seems more OOP. However, if you require each child class to have its own added implementation of foo() this may do the trick for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the reply, and this is an approach that I initially considered, but quickly found out that this will only work properly with one level of inheritance (I need it to work with an arbitrary number of levels - ex. Foo > Bar > Baz > Boz instead of just Foo > Bar). –  drrcknlsn Sep 12 '11 at 23:23
    
Its been a couple of years since I have done any PHP, but doesnt parent::_foo() work? I am not sure why you are so worried about a missing call to parent::_foo(); This is why we have unit tests ;) –  Brad Sep 12 '11 at 23:26
    
Yes, as long as each intermediate class also does parent::foo() (or parent::_foo() in your case). I wouldn't say that I'm worried about it; I was just curious. –  drrcknlsn Sep 12 '11 at 23:30
1  
Its an interesting question, but I guess I have never ran into a problem with having each subsequent class call the parent. –  Brad Sep 12 '11 at 23:32
    
Calls to the parent no, but the successive calls do remind me of the chain of responsability pattern. –  James Poulson Sep 13 '11 at 0:07

There's no way in PHP to enforce this specifically;

But, if Foo::foo must always execute before any subclass::foo, and you don't care about the results; perhaps the actual contents of the methods are badly designed.

If you always must initialize something, perhaps you can do it in the constructor, if you're logging every call, perhaps you need a decorator.

Here's another option that may work:

class Foo {

  function doFoo() {

    // the code that 'must always run' goes here
    ...
    ...
    ...
    // and now we're calling the 'overridden' method.
    foo();

  }

  protected function foo() {
     // move along, nothing to see here
  }


}

class Bar extends Foo {

  protected function foo() {
     // Bar-specific foo stuff. 
  }

}

class Baz extends Foo {

  protected function foo() {
     // Baz-specific foo stuff. 
  }

}

The flaw here is that there's no 'multiple inheritance' or chaining.

But yea, maybe you actually need some kind of pub-sub pattern.. or who knows?

You're asking how you can implement your solution to a design problem, you should specifically ask how to solve your design problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice comment at the end. "you're asking how you can implement your solution to a design problem, you should specifically ask how to solve your design problem." –  Herbert Sep 12 '11 at 23:13
1  
Essentially, each level of the inheritance chain has common behavior. I'm looking for a DRY way to execute all of this code in a single method invocation. I hope this helps explain a little better? –  drrcknlsn Sep 12 '11 at 23:20
    
@drrcknlsn: It does. If you can give an example of a problem where this might be needed please follow-up with a comment above ;) –  James Poulson Sep 12 '11 at 23:46

Not a great answer I know, but I can't think of any way you could enforce what you are after, or a better way of what you have described.

share|improve this answer

Sorry, misunderstood the question. Brad's suggestion seems to be most straightforward one. It goes along the lines of the utility method I described.

P.S: If these methods could be considered as variants of behaviour you could model that as a separate class/interface.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think you understood my question, as all of your suggestions seem unrelated. –  drrcknlsn Sep 12 '11 at 23:14
    
This does not really address his question, as he's concerned with maintaining consistency through his entire class inheritance chain. Interfaces and abstract classes cannot help with that. –  bioneuralnet Sep 12 '11 at 23:16
    
Apologies, it's 1 am here. I will reformulate. –  James Poulson Sep 12 '11 at 23:28
    
@James do you have a resource where I could research what you're referring to? I wouldn't be opposed to refactoring into another class/interface if it accomplishes the same goal. –  drrcknlsn Sep 12 '11 at 23:46
    
Not sure if it's relevant as the chaining sounds important. Here's a topic on the subject: stackoverflow.com/questions/5664572/… –  James Poulson Sep 12 '11 at 23:54

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